View Poll Results: Weekly Poll: Do you plan to homeschool through high school?

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  • Yes

    20 55.56%
  • No

    3 8.33%
  • I'm not sure

    9 25.00%
  • Other (comment in thread)

    4 11.11%
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  1. #11

    Default

    I chose 'I'm not sure'.
    My children will definitely homeschool next year, 8th grade.
    My daughter wants to try high school; my son would prefer to stay home through high school.
    homeschooled 4th through 8th grade - currently in public high school 10th grade
    Dumplett (girl - age 15) and Wombat (boy - age 15)

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  3. #12

    Default

    My oldest is going into 11th grade in the fall. She does some virtual school through FLVS and some homeschool. It's a great fit for her.
    Mom to D (2001) and Izzy (2006).

  4. #13

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    No crystal ball here either, but...we attended a local how-to-homeschool-here conference and the appeal of dual enrollment really jazzed the kid up. She wants to get college credit while in high school. That said, she might try the health/science portion of the county-wide career and technical training program for 11th/12th grades; that would be more than half her class load.

    We often debate on here how someone other than the parent teaching one's child is somehow "not real homeschooling." But with high school, I can't really see how homeschooling can be done without an online or community-college class or two or 20, especially if that child wants to go to college and beyond. So somehow I think high school = sh*t-ton easier for me to teach if I can subcontract a bunch of it.
    Eclectically homeschooling 8th grade dd, who likes science as much as art...

  5. #14
    IEF
    Guest

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    I debate back and forth on whether dd28 is a true "Homeschool Grad" but my conscience tells me that Wes Beach did the dirty work and he is awesome and deserves the occasional product placement in my forum posts.

    Ymmv and I would never tell the parent of a Beach High grad or current student that they "weren't a real homeschooler" in a snarky manner.

    It's a word. Language evolves. I can't read Chaucer unless it's been translated into modern English first. I think the current lingo and most understandable way to describe how my ds9's education differs from the norm is to describe us as "independent homeschoolers" rather than y'all as "not real homeschoolers".

    But that's just me.

  6. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by fastweedpuller View Post
    We often debate on here how someone other than the parent teaching one's child is somehow "not real homeschooling." But with high school, I can't really see how homeschooling can be done without an online or community-college class or two or 20, especially if that child wants to go to college and beyond. So somehow I think high school = sh*t-ton easier for me to teach if I can subcontract a bunch of it.
    No debate here. If a kid needs/wants any kind of skill or education beyond basic literacy, I think parents almost HAVE to outsource some of the high school education if unable to teach it themselves. I still think it's homeschooling as you, as the parent, search out the best possible courses and teachers for the student, whether it's you or someone else. You are not held to a bureaucratically determined curriculum.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  7. #16

    Default

    I think you're a homeschooler if you're legally homeschooling. A parent overseeing education by choosing other teachers is totally homeschooling.

    I know that in Maryland, they have some weird percentage rule though. Like, you can outsource some, but if you outsource everything, even if you've planned some sort of kickass awesome academic schedule with AP's and community college and so forth, you can fail your review, which seems bonkers. There's no such rule here though.

    I always thought that we'd outsource a lot for high school... but now we're getting close and I think it's going to be a lot less than I anticipated.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

  8. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    I still think it's homeschooling as you, as the parent, search out the best possible courses and teachers for the student, whether it's you or someone else. You are not held to a bureaucratically determined curriculum.
    Quote Originally Posted by farrarwilliams View Post
    I think you're a homeschooler if you're legally homeschooling. A parent overseeing education by choosing other teachers is totally homeschooling.
    I completely agree.
    We outsource several classes and my children are not at a high school level. I've been told I'm not a 'real homeschooler'. That's fine. I am doing what works well for our family.
    homeschooled 4th through 8th grade - currently in public high school 10th grade
    Dumplett (girl - age 15) and Wombat (boy - age 15)

  9. #18
    IEF
    Guest

    Default

    Here is some historical context for y'all :

    We Stand For Home Schooling

    the obligatory opposing view:

    https://marygriffith.net/rants-essay...nd-resolution/

    and one old-timer's honesty is saying that I might well have wound up being one of those nasty, hurtful people if I hadn't won the caboose baby lottery so I'm glad I'm not. To use a sportsball analogy, I still think the San Francisco Forty-niners are a better sportsball team than the Los Angeles Dodgers and that the world would have been a better place if my team had won the Super Bowl, but I accept the fact that the umpire's decision was honest and your team played a good game. I will be cheering for y'all in the Olympics because I still think we are better sportsball players than the Soviet Union and that it will all eventually work itself out in the end and that crying over spilled milk isn't in the best interest of Sportsball and is counterproductive to helping my great-grandchildren and my great-great-grandchildren become the best Sportsball players and fans that they can be.

    Does that help?

    You be you. The "not real homeschoolers" stuff isn't worth getting upset about at this point.

    Edited for clarity: Yes, I have seen an average/normie curriculum budget skyrocket from $200 per kid per year to $2,000+ per kid per year and I am not a fan, but my beef is with the curriculum publishing industry, not with parents trying to make the best educational choice for their kids in the culture of today. My grandparents probably had similar thoughts about horseless carriages, especially the grandfather whose sister was killed by a horseless carriage and never got to be my doting great aunt.
    Last edited by IEF; 05-10-2017 at 06:34 PM.

  10. #19

    Default

    I think there are a lot of legal repercussions when the only way to "homeschool" is to turn over your autonomy to a charter school. In all the states around me, the charter school "homeschoolers" have very little control - they're just K12 or Connections students. In a few states, the charter is just approving what you choose and giving you money. I'm not super suspicious about that... but I also think it shouldn't have to be the only option. And I'm aware that the education corporations would like it to be and that they think of themselves as supporting homeschooling. And, really, I do think that's a danger for independent homeschooling.

    But that's all legal stuff... if you're doing the picking and choosing and overseeing and teaching for the most part, I think homeschool groups should totally welcome you socially.

    Homeschooling has changed. Even just in the decade that I've been in the homeschool world, things are radically different. There is a really different mentality about homeschooling - not just in the world around us, but among homeschoolers themselves. There are a lot more people who *want* to be homeschooling but following the way the schools do things and want prepackaged programs that resemble school. And there's a lot fewer people who want to be writing their own programs, teaching themselves so they can teach their kids, and generally forging their own paths - especially when compared to even further back, into the 80's and 90's. And... that's okay. I think the fact that there's now a greater spectrum of educational choices (no matter what you call them) is a good thing for parents and kids. But I also feel obliged to fight for this particular strain of do it yourself homeschooling to some extent. Because I don't think it should die out... and the preponderance of options makes people think that there's something wrong with it, when it used to be more of the norm.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

  11. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    A retroactive yes for me. Actually, I pick up ds tomorrow at Purdue and dd on Tuesday at Iowa.
    I was a Boilermaker.
    CJ (Mom)
    Bug: 8 years old
    Doodle: 4 years old
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Weekly Poll: Do you plan to homeschool through high school?