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  1. #21
    Senior Member Evolved Deli76's Avatar
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    library card! we use ours lots for books, videos, music and our library has events for families and children.
    paper, pencils, crayons, water colors, colored pencils, erasers, markers, white board, 3 hole punch, folders, binders and many more that have been suggested and you will always have your needs and the childrens needs. Have Fun!
    Bobo 13 yrs old - marches to the beat of her own drum, driven, out going and loud, yet she loves nature
    Booger Boy 21 yrs old - quiet, self assured, confident and laying his own path

    umbers cucumbers!!!!

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  3. #22
    Senior Member Arrived Avalon's Avatar
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    My laptop + internet connection

    Large whiteboard on the kitchen wall - use it constantly. It is a central feature of our homeschool life.

    A set of base 10 blocks. Used these constantly for my daughter, and I still pull them out occasionally if she's getting confused.

    Paper, pencils, pencil crayons, craft stuff goes without saying.

    We never use the dictionary, thesaurus or atlas because we just use Google.

    Science and history encyclopedias - We have both Kingfisher and Usborne and look at them frequently.

    Shelves. Lots and lots of shelves.

  4. #23
    Senior Member Evolved Deli76's Avatar
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    oh yes...i forgot lots of pennies! dd likes to collect coins so we pennies for math. the visual is awesome for her! maps too. everytime she reads a book she heads right to the map to see where the book is about! so many possibilities!
    Bobo 13 yrs old - marches to the beat of her own drum, driven, out going and loud, yet she loves nature
    Booger Boy 21 yrs old - quiet, self assured, confident and laying his own path

    umbers cucumbers!!!!

  5. #24

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    Computer, internet connection, books - lots of them - writing materials, scrap paper, art supplies, globe/world map. I like to keep it simple.

  6. #25

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    Okay, some repeats here:

    Multi-function printer, used as both a printer and photocopier.

    Three hole punch that does many pages at once

    Good quality pencil sharpener. I've gone through several--I really need to find a good one that I can stick with!

    Staples Back-to-School sales. Every year, they have fantastic deals on things like loose leaf and printer/copier paper, pencils, erasers, etc. Often they will have things that are entirely free. Loose leaf lined paper has been as little as 10-15 cents per pack, printer paper I've gotten for free or for less than $1 per ream, Crayola 20 pack box for 15 cents, etc. Get as much as you can, and come back for more if possible. You'll go through tons of paper and pencils, so it's worth it to stock up, even if there are things you won't use right away, like college ruled paper. The sales are different every year, so you need to look at what they're offering and think ahead.

    Computer, though I didn't use it nearly as much in the early years, though 4th grade or so. Now it's indispensable.

    3 ring binders

    Index cards (something to look for in Staples' sales) Great for flash cards in the early years, note taking later on, etc.

    Less indispensable, but very useful: Staples® The Desk Apprentice It holds a LOT of stuff. I've had it for many years, still use it, and I'm sure I'll keep using it when I'm done homeschooling (eep!).

    Things I didn't use much: "Fancy" pencils (sparkly, funky colors or with characters--they never work as well as a yellow #2) and a variety of artsy-crafty supplies. My son wasn't nearly as crafty as I wished he would be! He used the supplies when there was an art assignment that needed something specific, but he rarely did anything with them on his own.

    Also, mechanical pencils work great, but never survive the year. The cheap, disposable ones are, well, disposable, and I can't easily find good quality, metal bodied ones. They are all plastic, and fall apart by the end of the year.
    Kara

    Mom to one, 18 year old son.

  7. #26

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    All my essentials are really just family essentials -- books, internet, art supplies, a small tabletop white board (two-sided and it stands up, not sure if it's got a certain name) which we all use constantly, and a self-inking date stamp. we try and stamp everything on the back in case we hold on to it, because already I look at stuff and we have NO idea when it's from. I only wish I'd had it years ago. Also, totally individual but someone on these forums posted about the erasable Frixion pens from Pilot and they have become a must. A globe is an excellent idea -- I loved ours growing up -- but we haven't gotten one.
    DD, 8...8? how did that happen?

  8. #27

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    One more thing: my son is much older, so this probably doesn't apply to younger kids. Having his own laptop is indispensable. It lets him work on things (research, watching videos, typing) while not tying up my laptop (FB, Pin..., I mean research, planning, taking notes on his progress). We don't use any online classes, but if we did, it would make his own laptop even more important. He has writing issues, so typing all his assignments is vital.
    Son - 7th grade, HS
    Daughter - 10th grade, PS
    Blog – in progress, Home Schooling in 7th Grade

  9. #28

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    I forgot about the printer... We just bought a super cool new printer. It is on our wireless network and has an app feature that the girls can use to print coloring pages or activity pages whenever they want. It makes them feel so grown up and I love coming upstairs from switching laundry to see them coloring at the table all on their own initiative.
    Playing and learning as we grow! DD1 12/17/2008 DD2 12/15/2010
    Math: Horizons Handwriting: Handwriting W/O Tears
    Reading: All About Reading Science: Sassafrass Science
    Spelling: All About Spelling Art: Artistic Pursuits
    History/ Social Studies: TBD Language Arts: First Language Lessons/ Writing With Ease

  10. #29

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    A clipboard for each child (good catch PP!), printer, and the usual supplies (pencils, sharpener, crayons, paper).

    We use wall=mounted chalkboards instead of whiteboards (the whiteboard is just used for magnets, lol). The small whiteboards and slate never got used by the kids, seemed to flimsy, so I ended up putting schedule stuff and hanging on the wall -- kind of a waste.

    Beyond that, my advice would be to get started and wait to see what things you find you just find YOU WISH you had or can't do without. Like others have said, it's a personal thing. Expect to reorganize a half dozen times over the first couple years (unless you are one of those organizational mavens already). Having a place for where things are when they are not in use and when they are finished is important -- you will be amazed art how much your kids will produce and how much will accumulate EVERYWHERE if you let it! LOL

  11. #30

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    I think all the basics have been covered, but I'll throw out a few things just for argument's sake.

    We don't have a globe. We have a map of the world that's hung on the wall and an atlas for more in-depth discussion. Various encyclopedias on different subjects have been invaluable to us as well. We have a the Usborne and Kingfisher encyclopedias for both history and science (which may seem like overkill, and yes, there is some overlap, but with two kids, I can assign certain pages out of each for reading and then they don't fight over who gets the book first, because mine WILL devolve instantly into tears and punching if I try to make them share more than they think they ought).

    We actually have two printers - one is solely for black and white, and it's in the school room. The other is a printer/scanner/copier/fax machine (we don't use the fax feature for school, but DH uses it for work) and does color. It lives in DH's office.

    If you don't already have a digital camera, get one. Then you can take photos of the process!

    Electric/mechanical pencil sharpener. The time spent sharpening pencils will astound you, and this is particularly true if your child develops an affinity for colored pencils.

    Shelving for books. There's never enough. Or invest in an e-reader of some sort.
    ---
    Sarah B., Oklahoma

    "By three methods we may learn wisdom: first, by reflection, which is noblest; second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third, by experience, which is the bitterest." - Confucius

    Blog: Our Sunnyview

    Less-than-Zenlike mother of:
    M1 - The Boy, age 11, home since 2009 - loves science, swimming, and folk music
    M2 - The Girl, age 9, home since 2012 - loves anatomy, the arts, and her violin

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