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  1. #1

    Default Is anyone else afraid of loving homeschooling? Or been there?

    I posted a lengthy introduction, but I wanted to reach out here...We just started homeschooling, and it is going so well for our family. I'm not surprised by that, really. Just before this pandemic began, I had resolved to give up my dream of homeschooling and had taken the first steps in a career in education. My own interests and study have brought me so much satisfaction and balance. Now I'm back to the same old questions....What will win, my career or homeschooling? Anyone been there or wondering now?

    Collette

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
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    Hi Collette I responded to your intro and mentioned that I also quit working a job I enjoyed to homeschool. Adjusting to a new career identity, homeschooler, as opposed to nurse, took a little bit of time and sometimes was not the easiest. I missed feeling competent and having some external validation (no job performance evaluations here - unless you count the kids and they fully, A+, thumbs-up approve of about 10% of the assignment lol). I also remind myself that nursing is a field I can easily go back to, granted I will have missed out of advancements, but that's something I'm ok with.
    Rebecca
    DS 15, DD 13
    Year 9

  4. #3

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    We are done homeschooling now (kids graduated and went to college), but I have to admit that I loved it. I had been a high school math and physics teacher. When the kids were born the plan was that I'd return to school when the youngest reached 1st grade. The were in PS for a couple of years, and we pulled them to homeschool them year by year, re-evaluating at the end of each year. We kept going all the way through.

    Yes, there were some bad days and some downright icky days. But overall it was good and sometimes terrific. I would have not done it any other way.

    For me, though, I went from teaching in one form to teaching in another, so there were similarities. Even now, I still teach math and physics to local homeschoolers. In the age of COVID, I am teaching physics in my backyard (as long as the weather holds) and yesterday they were all spread out working on a lab that required a ton of room. It was great!
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University graduate: BS in Computer Science, minor in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  5. #4

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    I think it is probably something we all think about at some time. I try to do both (homeschool and work), and sometimes wish I could do just the homeschooling, but then I like the extras that we can do with the money I earn, so I keep working.

    With my oldest heading towards her teen years, it has made me realize how short this will all be anyway. I have homeschooled her for 4 years, and it has gone by really fast. Cliche I know, but it only feels like yesterday that we were starting out. The next part will go by really fast too. I ride horses as a hobby and sometimes lament that I can only ride once a week and cannot buy my own horse because of lack of $. Then I think, when my kids leave home, I am going to have both a lot more money and time and I can ride every day because I will be so bored with nothing to do. (When I tell my kids this, they tell me that they will make sure I am not bored because they will send me things from where ever they go.)

    Anyway, that's my rambling. Yes, I think about this frequently, but overall, even with my DD12's current resistant phase, I get a lot of joy out of homeschooling. The thought of having my kids in school and not knowing them so well makes me feel sadder than missing out on money and career now. I do worry that I will hit post-homeschool and be irrelevant in terms of age + career but I will make it work somehow and will have so much time to figure out how to do that.
    NZ homeschoolers (school year runs start Feb to mid Dec).
    DD 12 (year 7) and DD 7 (year 2).
    Fourth year homeschooling.
    Part-time freelance science copyeditor.

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    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NZ_Mama View Post
    The thought of having my kids in school and not knowing them so well makes me feel sadder than missing out on money and career now.
    This! Exactly.

    The time they are truly with me is so short compared to my entire lifespan (hopefully), thus, in my mind, making homeschooling literally a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. When am I ever going to get a chance like that?!
    Last edited by RTB; 09-10-2020 at 05:21 PM.
    Rebecca
    DS 15, DD 13
    Year 9

  7. #6

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    I think what I'm personally afraid of is that I'll love it (so far, I do!) but my son will look back and hate it. I worry that I'll feel so good about what we're doing, that I'll miss the signs that he's really unhappy. I don't mean the one-off struggles of a single day or topic. I don't expect either of us to go along happily all the time, especially when the going gets tough! But I worry that my son will try to hide underlying unhappiness from me because he'll see that I'm happy, and he's a people-pleaser.

    (Which of course means that I'm inwardly freaking out over every bad/cranky/crabby moment.)

    So yeah, I guess I am afraid of loving homeschooling...

  8. #7

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    I am doing both. It is not ideal, but it is working for us. There is a balance of work done between me and DH. Now that DS is older, it is getting a little easier too.

  9. #8

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    Thank you everyone for your replies! It's encouraging just to hear other's experiences. I'm inspired to be a little more flexible in my thinking about work possibilities (teaching English online is a thing), but also to accept the uncertainty and take it one year at a time.

    Heather, I know what you mean! I wonder about that too, especially with my older daughter. Maybe she won't like this best. Maybe she'll hide that to protect my feelings. This year it's an easy call, and I'm "lucky" that she feels comfortable complaining, usually!

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Is anyone else afraid of loving homeschooling? Or been there?