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  1. #11

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    Hi Nick,
    Charter Brick N Mortars may have wait lists, etc, but Ive yet to hear of a homeschooling charter with a wait list.
    Shop around... the only one Id warn you against is Classical Academies... theyre "wink wink nudge nudge" secular. (And they dont offer as much independence as I prefer, but everyones tastes vary.) Who knows what new schools will be offered by the time your daughter is ready to join, though.

    If you visit San Diego while schools are in session, its likely they will be happy to let you visit the sites during the classes. (Same with when your kid is enrolled... youre welcome to stay if youre having a day where the umbilical cord isnt stretching very far. At least at my charter.)

    All of California has these charters, do a google search for "(county name) homeschool charters". Find some that interest you!
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

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  3. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by alexsmom View Post
    Hi Nick,
    Charter Brick N Mortars may have wait lists, etc, but Ive yet to hear of a homeschooling charter with a wait list.
    Shop around... the only one Id warn you against is Classical Academies... theyre "wink wink nudge nudge" secular. (And they dont offer as much independence as I prefer, but everyones tastes vary.) Who knows what new schools will be offered by the time your daughter is ready to join, though.

    If you visit San Diego while schools are in session, its likely they will be happy to let you visit the sites during the classes. (Same with when your kid is enrolled... youre welcome to stay if youre having a day where the umbilical cord isnt stretching very far. At least at my charter.)

    All of California has these charters, do a google search for "(county name) homeschool charters". Find some that interest you!
    Wonderful input. Thank you! I will get on my research down there

    Nick T

  4. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick T View Post
    Now we are talking, farrarwilliams! This is amazingly insightful information. Exactly what I needed. I think we will have to do a longer stay (1-3 months) in both the DC and RDU areas to check them out as they sound like real candidates!

    Would suggest any particular time of year to stay to get a better feel? Maybe times to avoid as well? Thank you SO much!!!

    Nick
    DC is best visited outside of tourist season. Just, generally. So, tourist season is basically March-August. Winter can be unpleasant here - not too bad compared to the actual north, but it's very unpredictable. Fall is usually really nice in DC. The weather stays warmish but isn't too oppressive. The crowds are gone. The museums are back to being ours. The tourists are a mild con to life in DC... but without them we also wouldn't have the good things like the museums, festivals, massive protest marches in the mud. And if you live here, you just learn to visit places outside of the season more or to visit poor, unvisited museums like the Smithsonian Museum of African Art or the Frackler (Freer/Sackler) or (assuming there's no Infinity Mirrors!) the Hirshhorn. And, of course, the other benefits of life here are all the time.

    RDU... any time. It gets really hot in the summer, of course. Winter can be cold, but usually isn't. I'd say spring and fall are best for the weather. But there is no tourist season. It's not a destination at all. It's just a nice place to live and there's plenty to see if you were to visit.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
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    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

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  5. #14

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    I would choose a homebase that has lots of museums and cultural offerings, an airport, nearby colleges and a well-educated population, a thriving economy for internships, and an excellent university system with great in-state tuition options once your kids are older. NC, CA, NY, VA, PA...

  6. #15

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    Many, many secular homeschoolers here in the Kansas City area.

    Low cost of living and fun things to do too.

    Con would be colder winter than I would prefer.

  7. #16
    Junior Member Newbie
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    BC
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    I recommend Somerville, Boston. Nice area with lots to do. It's truly a great place to raise kids weather you home school them or not. Also my own city Vancouver (Canada) is pretty decent for home schooling. It's actually quite common here.

  8. #17

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    Well, lets see. Bozeman Montana has college, lots of hiking, camping and rock finding opportunities. Museum of the Rockies (small, but okay.) College town, so fairly liberal thinking. No support for homeschoolers from the schools. You are enrolled in school or you are not, is my understanding.

    CA - Indepentant homeschooling is basically saying you are your own private school...go do what you want. Lots of people in the Santa Cruz area where I lived. Really expensive to live in Santa Cruz area, but lots of stuff with beaches, aquarium, hiking in the mountains and such. Lots of homeschoolers. Charter Homeschools, technically make you a "public schooler" but depending on the school, you can choose secular curriculum, get stuff paid for like karate or swimming lessons, computers, etc.

    WA - If you are independent you need to have a certain amount of education or take a parent qualifying class. You need to do a declaration of intent to homeschool after age 8. As a homeschooler, you can enroll part time in local schools to take individual classes, you can enroll part or full time in ALE (Alternative Learning Experience schools, akin to the charter schools in CA and vary by district.) Once your child is 11th grade they can enroll in Running Start and earn an AA at a local community college and WSU colleges. If you live in the west, you have lots of museums in Seattle and Tacoma, if you live in the east, you have a more frontier experience with smaller towns, dryer climate. Richland WA is home of the Handford Reservation, part of the Manhattan Project (was in the news for the tunnel collapse yesterday....) and also PNNL, Pacific Northwest National Labortory. Oh, and one of the LIGO labs...where they discovered the gravitational waves. The surrounding areas are filled with a mix of liberal people, (more than Bozeman, less than Santa Cruz) and lots of well educated people. Many people are religious (again, not as much as Bozeman and more than Santa Cruz) but I have not had a hard time finding people who are tolerant of the fact that we do not attend church. The main drawback to where I live on the East Side is the fact that we are perhaps a little far from many of the things in Seattle area....Boeing and such. West Side is more liberal overall, but there are pockets of conservatism there too.

    I did live in MD, but did not homeschool there. I hear that you have to have your yearly plan approved by the school district, which where I lived, was probably a pain in the rear, knowing people on the Eastern Shore. But, other than being county and close to Baltimore and DC, I wouldn't recommend the Eastern Shore of MD. They are very clannish there and not accepting of foreigners. And you are always a foreigner. I actually saw an obituary of a 98 year old "Baltimore Woman" who died on the Eastern Shore...she moved there when she was 2 months old and lived there her whole life. On the other hand, the locals will only date locals, so you don't have to worry about one of your kids marrying one of the all interrelated people there. (My step grandmother said I was step related to about 90% of my 4-H club...) Annapolis...much nicer area.

  9. #18

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    How about Northern NJ? A quick train ride to NYC, a slightly longer train ride to Philly. Mountains, oceans, lakes, lots of historical sites. Four distinct seasons. Lots of secular homeschoolers, lots of diversity in general. And absolutely no homeschool requirements. No notification, no testing, no portfolio, no reporting. Nada.
    Dorothy
    Back home after three years!!
    Steph - college Graduate!!!
    George - 8/2005
    Vicki - 7/2007
    Dottie's Homeschool Universe

  10. #19

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    A disclaimer first: I do NOT yet homeschool. But it is something I've known I've wanted to do at some point, & we are getting close to jumping in! My husband is a boarding school administrator, & I founded a private, middle school 6 years ago (after a career as a math professor & school consultant). So I do think I am somewhat knowledgeable about how schools & homeschooling work in NH, as well as being a busy body in the community.

    I moved to Concord, NH after 12 years in NYC. And I LOVE it here. Wonderful place to raise kids. And there are a lot of homeschoolers & many resources. Everything you want & need, very accessible, without the traffic, hassle, & cost of bigger cities or suburbs. All 4 seasons, skiing, hiking, lakes & ocean 40 minutes away, Boston an hour or so away, regional airport. Music, concerts, farmers markets, great town recreation programs for kids, most museums have homeschool programs, a homeschool theater guild, a very politically active homeschool coalition (and then politics go to a new level in NH); it is controversial but the state has a "scholarship" program that reimburses parents for some homeschool expense, and it is a state law that any child can use their public school for whatever they need or want (ie, homeschool students might participate in their local school's play or XC ski team). Also, the state has a virtual charter school that is open to homeschoolers, & many private schools allow homeschool students to enroll in classes.

    My best friend (a math PhD who grew up in WV) says she loves visiting us, because she feels she can have the rural, homeyness, laid back, lack of pretense of WV (at our state fairs, farms, or on a hike or kayak), but with an intellectualism & yankee ingenuity.

  11. #20

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    Something I would consider that I haven't seen brought up yet is regulations. How easy or difficult it would be for me to homeschool legally would weigh heavily on my decision. I've homeschooled in 4 different states and overseas. I homeschooled about an hour south of RDU and there is a lot more oversight and testing there than when we lived in South Carolina or Kansas. South Carolina required that we be part of a homeschool umbrella group but not a whole lot else. Kansas required that we name officially name our homeschool (lol) but after that we didn't have to do anything else. Out of every place you listed, Texas would be my first choice because the requirements to homeschool are so much more lenient than the other places.

    Honestly we've been able to find other homeschoolers every where we went though I didn't mind if they were completely like minded or not because I like having a diverse group of friends and I like my children being exposed to diversity and learning how to appreciate people of all types. It is annoying sometimes when it seems like you are the only non Christian in a homeschool group (come to think of it when we lived in the Carolinas that came up way more frequently than other places we lived) but my kids did learn how to get along with other who have a different view of the world and how to think critically about what others tell them and how to respectfully express their own beliefs without trampling on others. Just some food for thought.

    If I could live anywhere, it would be in a state with low oversight on homeschoolers, within an hour or two of a major airport so we could travel worldwide often, with fair weather because I just don't like extreme cold or heat lol and a reasonable cost of living so I could have a good amount of discretionary income to spend on educational things. Just my two cents based on my experiences.

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