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  1. #11
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    I used to. During the 20th and early 21st I thought that the world would be a better place if more people homeschooled or at least knew that homeschooling was an option.

    Homeschooling has changed and the world has changed. I rarely bring it up any more. I would probably say something along the lines of, "No, ds doesn't go to that school so I didn't know. I am sorry that happened/is happening to you and your child."

    If life had gone the other way and I had not been able to conceive my caboose baby I would probably have been involved in homeschooling activism, but various events in the homeschooling community over the past few years have definitely made me grateful that I am living my life instead of Ann Zeiss', Heart's, Helen Hegener's, etc.

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  3. #12

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    I'm in the same zone at TFZ. I (and most of my friends) have kids in the under 7 crowd. And when they complain at me about how horrible their PS is, and how miserable their child is, I just tell them that's why we homeschool. If they continue to complain at me, I tell them to either get involved at the school to change it, pick a private school, homeschool, or SOMETHING, but stop whining if they aren't willing to do anything about it. On second thought, this could be why ppl don't whine to me for long.

  4. #13

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    Our conversations with others about home educating our child seem to usually end up being defensive the more in depth they get. We usually don't bring it up unless we're asked directly. Over here (SE Asia) it seems very common for parents to ask where your kid goes to school. I think it's a competition among the schools and parents showing off type thing.

    I did have an interesting experience the other day. I was picking up my daughter from her Chinese Mandarin lesson when one of the mothers approached me and said, "I understand that you homeschool your daughter. She seems quite well-adjusted and able to get along with the kids. If you have some time I'd like to ask you some questions." So we sat and chatted for about 20 minutes and I answered what I could based on our experiences. It was interesting that she already had the pre-conceived notion that kids taught at home are probably not well-adjusted or able to get along with kids. But, I did find it refreshing that someone was fairly open-minded and curious about what we do.

  5. #14
    Senior Member Enlightened
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    Once upon a time, a private school teacher colleague of mine told me I should homeschool DS when I was complaining about his schooling. She wasn't even a homeschooling mom, but it is possible she had considered it for her daughter. That comment rattled around my brain, along with all the things DS had to deal with in school and everything I had learned while getting an M.A. in education, for a couple more years before we took the HS plunge.
    I figure suggesting homeschooling to many people may just plant a seed somewhere. Around here, it's all about whether you send your kid to public or private school. So many people have just never thought about the third option for even one second.

  6. #15
    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TFZ View Post
    Maybe the schools are just especially bad around here? Or maybe the moms I know are humoring me? The parents I know that have education or early childhood ed backgrounds are especially horrified by the public schools. One mom keeps posting her kid's homework - kindergartners identifying pronouns. Um. Okay... Like it's not hard enough to READ the word. Now they are supposed to identify the part of speech? I know it's some sort of spiraling down from whatever they are supposed to know grammatically in 2nd grade. Thanks Common Core. But pronouns in K? Get real.
    Yep, we started HSing because the homework was ridiculous. I spent just as much time helping a totally exhausted, over stimulated kinder kiddo complete homework as I did on seat work once we started homeschooling. I was shocked (and irritated) at the amount and level of homework.

    I've mentioned it to a few people. People I knew who are very unhappy with PS. Usually I let them know that I'm happy to share what I've learned about HSing, how we go about our days, and a tour of our bookshelves if they want. I also refer them here.

    I still think most of them don't see HSing as an option, I don't know why (esp if one is a SAH-parent).
    Last edited by RTB; 11-17-2016 at 09:30 AM. Reason: info
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

  7. #16
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RTB View Post
    I don't know why (esp if one is a SAH-parent).
    Yes this. I get a lot of - wow I wish we could do that. I'm like, why NOT? I'm doing it with two toddlers running around. Idk I feel like some people make things harder than they need to be. Maybe that's too judgmental of me? I can't stand it when sahms act so harassed about taking care of their own kids.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  8. #17

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    Homework! UGH! I spent 3 hours every night trying to get Tech to do his letters, in the school approved color, in the school approved way. 3 hours! FOR PRE-K! K5, we averaged 2 hours a day on formal education. And that was our entire school day, not after he'd already been at school for 6 hours. First grade we've moved more unschooly so we spend even less time on "formal learning" and more on random learning.

  9. #18
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Homeschooling an entire curriculum is better than doing homework. I'm positive of that. It's funny, though, when I was teaching I used to send home one worksheet per night and a book. For some, that wasn't enough. They'd do the weekly packet on Monday night and complain that they didn't have anything to do the rest of the week. I was like, "Just keep reading (and stop bothering me)."
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  10. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by farrarwilliams View Post
    It takes a certain sort of person to want to.
    Can you elaborate on this? I'm struggling with trying to figure out if I am the kind of person who can homeschool successfully.

  11. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by I_before_E View Post
    Can you elaborate on this? I'm struggling with trying to figure out if I am the kind of person who can homeschool successfully.
    I think the main thing is wanting to do it. All the people who say, "Oh, that's amazing, I could never do that..." - I usually think, well maybe if you had to because of a crisis you could figure it out, but it's a good thing you probably don't have to. It can be really rewarding, but also lonely or thankless in other ways. So if you don't have that core belief that "this is best" driving you onward, I think it can be hard to sustain. You're swimming against the tide and if you don't believe in it, then it's likely you'll just be carried back by that tide.

    I think there are other qualities that help, like being willing to put yourself out there and help your kid make friends, having some modicum of education, being intellectually curious yourself... But I don't think there's any particular quality that is absolutely necessary. I've known disorganized people who homeschooled successfully, less educated people who did it successfully, serious introverts who did it successfully...

    This is not to say that everyone succeeds. Some people do it for a year or two and do okay but don't feel satisfied or find that their kids are struggling in ways they can't meet or that it's ruining their relationship with their kids (this often goes the other way - homeschooling tends to improve relations with your kids, but not absolutely every time). That's not a big deal. You try, it doesn't work out the way you wanted, but take the long view - it's not going to hurt the kids. Any schooling choice has advantages and disadvantages and it's absolutely no worse than a less optimal year of brick and mortar school - and possibly even better. And, of course, there are people who homeschool for some philosophical reason or to hide abuse or something and don't do a very good job, even neglect their kids. But those don't tend to be secular types. Or people who worry they might not be good enough at it.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

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