Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,728
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    Aandwsmom and I have been having fun pulling this Pinterest board together over the past few weeks:
    https://www.pinterest.com/secularhs/...eschool-ideas/


  2. T4L In Forum Oct19
  3. #12

    Default

    Mariam, I am in that same quandary with the Peanuts shows: I like them on nostalgic value, but even I have to admit that Lucy's aggression, once seen as liberating and edgy and daring in a day when women on television still meekly submitted to being steered by the elbow by men who didn't even know them, hits a tinny note these days. Quite frankly, Lucy is sociopathic. I watch her behavior nowadays and feel like she needs a good what-for.

    But in the context of the Battle of the Sexes, Lucy was more of a mascot of empowerment for women and girls who were trying to climb out of being conditioned to being treated in a way that was truly demeaning.

    It seems that cultural context makes or breaks the comic.
    Except for Calvin and Hobbes. That one just never stales.

    But watching Peanuts, the Brady Bunch, and pretty much anything put forth in the latter half of the 20th Century, brings up loads of opportunities to discuss the treatment of women by society and how it shifted during and after the World Wars, and even how the Vietnam War affected women's roles and lives..including the imbalance in women and men, following wars. Behaviors, values, and attitudes shift when there is no longer roughly a 1:1 correspondence between males and females of marriageable age.

    Searching for cultural context in order to understand memes of the day, is another benefit of wrapping our minds around how different attitudes can be from one era to the next. One could be hotly outraged at Lucy's antisocial behavior, or learn about the Women's Lib movement and why it actually happened, and become sympatheic. One could cry foul at the "battle of the sexes" themes running through early Brady Bunch episodes, that were in modern terms, insulting to women and girls, but were in their own cultural context, ideas that needed exploring and talking about in order to question.

    I guess we've made the mid-to-late 20th Century a thought laboratory for wars and consumerism, and their effects on gender and social relationships.

    It is strange how 20th-century things I once took for granted, which made sense to me as water makes intuitive sense to a fish, began to emit sour notes and jar my consciousness with embedded misogyny or sociopathy, once I moved beyond the assumptions of those times.

    Half the science fiction I once loved reading, now turns my stomach.
    Middle-aged mom of 4 kids spanning a 10-year age range, homeschooling since 2009, and a public school mom also, since 2017.

  4. #13

    Default

    Burdening little children with things that inspire dread, heartache, or guilt, isn't my idea of constructive. The emotional ability to handle that comes later. That doesn't mean we have to lie to them, either...so I'm glad to see this thread and all the ideas listed here, because as with religion, I have tread softly on Thanksgiving while I have littles.

    Knowing who the Pilgrims were, why they fled England to Holland, then why they fled Holland to the New World, then why they were paradoxically intolerant of others' religious freedoms, is fine and well. Knowing that the First Nations here were as different from one another as the French, English, Germans, and Spanish were from each other, is also good, because it helps us avoid the tendency to lump them together. Learning about the idea of the Noble Savage, and its history, and how it was applied to vanquished cultures who were subsequently idolized (such as the Highland Scots after the Battle of Culloden, and the First Nations of the New World) is something I keep tucked away in mind for those who are old enough...probably the teens is a better time than early childhood.

    But in the meantime, I don't want to perpetuate the Noble Savages myths on my kids, nor the Virtue-Bearing Europeans myths either. People are not so radically different. We are like salads with a variety of ingredients, and our cultures are the dressings. Garden Salad, Cobb Salad, Southwestern Salad, Waldorf Salad...we're all salads, and at our basic level, we behave like salads. Best chilled, worse when baked, fried, or steamed. When kids get old enough to process more adult burdens without harm, I think that is the time to talk about the rest. For now, it makes sense to be grateful for enough food to last the winter, no matter the other ramifications.

    But hand turkeys? You bet! Learning about Plymouth Rock and so on? YES! We even have a lapbook kit on it, sitting there til someone who actually likes cutting, coloring, and pasting comes along (thinking DS5, this year!). We are Americans, which may be a contradictory mangle of distinctiveness and sameness, but it's all we've got, darnit, and we have to knit together something. No one else's cultural myth is any purer or better. It's all based on telling the good and suppressing the bad.

    The way the foods indigenous to the New World changed the world, is another thing to appreciate. Finding out what Irish food was like before potatoes, what Italian food was before tomatoes, what the world was like before maize, what India's cuisine was before peppers, is very informative.

    Or, we skip all that learning and just have fun having a feast and being grateful for not going hungry, and try to realize what a harvest is and why it deserves a celebration. Also, I plan to investigate celebrating Canadian Thanksgiving next year. The timing makes more sense, to me.
    Last edited by crunchynerd; 11-07-2016 at 05:47 PM.
    Middle-aged mom of 4 kids spanning a 10-year age range, homeschooling since 2009, and a public school mom also, since 2017.

  5. #14

    Default

    In the end, whether is conflict within the forum or a conflict in society, the common bond is food.

  6. #15

    Default

    Wahahahahahahhah I think Addams Family needs to be shown to our kids as part of their "cultural literacy".

    Maybe not for wee littles, though.

    Im going to stick the genocide to the history lessons at some future date, and let thanksgiving be about eating harvest foods.
    Turkey hands - yes.
    Pilgrim hats (or mock-indian headbands) - not so much.

    Just like xmas trees at xmas, not so much the manger scenes.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  7. #16
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,609
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    We are culturally secular for Thanksgiving, then. Religiously secular for Christmas. Lol. Completely secular.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  8. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mariam View Post
    In the end, whether is conflict within the forum or a conflict in society, the common bond is food.
    Oh! Is pie a resource? I could totally start woth that resource today.
    Gotta try out what the options are for t-day!
    Thinking another go at EJmom's chocolate bourbon pecan pie might be just thing thing. If any bourbon makes it to the pie.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  9. #18
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,609
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    I was just watching a FB post for chocolate cherry dump cake something or other. OMG I can't stop thinking about it. Is cherry dump cake Thanksgiving-y enough?
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  10. #19

    Default

    We covered the holiday in K and 1st. We read a picture book on the first Thanksgiving feast between the Native Americans and Pilgrims. Then another one on the history of Thanksgiving becoming an actual holiday, which happened well after the United States was already it's own country. It took years to convince the government to create the holiday. But that was it. We don't cover it year after year.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
What kind of Thanksgiving? Resources?