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  1. #21

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    I was thinking more about this...

    Yesterday at lunch, I asked DS10 "What sport do the Chsrgers play?"
    The look of blankness.
    "Who are the 49ers?"
    His face lit up. "The people who came to California for the gold rush at Sutters Mill."

    Not sportsfans at this house. Should I subjugate him to learning about football, because its a part of our society? Its probably more likely to come up in an idle conversation than religion.

    Same thing with celebrity gossip. If I dont know a person's middle name, I have no business knowing about their sex life. Yet that sort of crap is common 'cultural' knowledge too.

    Do you have to understand anything more than a little bit about baseball to get the humor of Who's on First?

    I also think the subtlty of satire is lost on kids... even if it would be a subject matter everyone is familiar with.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

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  3. #22

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    Exactly, AM. We will never be able to inoculate our children from every uncomfortable social situation they will encounter. The fact that we are homeschooling is usually what worries parents like us the most. Let go of the bubble machine! They will be fine.

    I once asked my son if he wonders what it's like to go to school, or feels like he's missing out on anything. His answer...."No. I've seen movies. I can pretty much put it together." It's the same with church.....not much to see here folks. I can pretty much put it together, and if I care enough to understand further....I can read.

    How a person, after making a conscious effort not to indoctrinate, can be surprised that no indoctrination has happened....is beyond me.
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  4. #23

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    AM & ML those are good points. I have a question though. Where do we draw the line at what cultural knowledge is important and what is not important enough to talk about with our kids? We don't debate that some literature is important, but is not knowing anything about sports also putting kids at a disadvantage?

    (Note that I am playing devil's advocate here. )
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  5. #24

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    Mariam, it depends on what their future circle will be. I know NOTHING about sports. And I went to games as a child. I just had no interest. However, none of my friends care about sports. Ask us how we enjoyed the game the night before and most of us will only be vaguely aware of what season it is. However, during every single geek movie this year, for WEEKS after each movie comes out, we have a "no spoilers" rule. A movie must be out for a minimum of a month (or until all of us have seen it) before anyone is allowed to talk about it. Dragoncon is our Superbowl (i assume the other sports have a similar thing but don't ask me what those are). Halloween is a bigger deal than Christmas.

    My husband grew up in a household where religion was so far down the list he knows next to nothing about it. I grew up immersed so deeply I knew next to nothing about everything else! I don't think you can determine what cultural knowledge is important. What if they don't live in the US? What if you like sports and teach them all about it, and they grow up to be a geek instead? Cultural knowledge is one of those things that is so specific. My husband's culture, just in small town northeastern US, was drastically different than mine in big city southeast. Same country even and yet, we sometimes have no point of reference when the other is talking.

    WE try to make kids "well-rounded" and I don't get that. We're specialists. As adults, we will pursue what we enjoy, learn what interests us, and have knowledge about that which we want to know about. We will group with ppl with like ideas, similar interests, and common ideals. We make our own cultural identity.

    When Tech wants to learn about religion, we'll have him read Dune. Or Pratchett. Or Gaiman. Or watch Stargate. Or Star Wars. Heck, DS:9 or B5 would be worthy of a study on the topic of religion alone. :-)

    My opinion from the geek culture. :-)

  6. #25

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    Mariam, I love when you keep it fun and play devil's advocate!

    Well, knowledge is knowledge....cultural or otherwise, right?

    I'm not sure how old you are, but when I was in high school, typing (not keyboarding) was a required course. We learned on the newest high tech available at the time. A Word Processor with a floppy disk to store our progress!!!!

    I've managed to figure out the basics of my computer since then. And if it were real important to me, I have enough confidence in my ability to learn, to know that I could access the resources to learn what I needed.

    Isn't that what we all have, for the most part, as a main goal for our kids......to learn how to learn, even when we "drop the ball" or can't possibly know that computers will be pretty important someday???? I certainly don't blame my 1st grade teacher or parents for not introducing the ipad! LOL!!!

    Now of course, football and christianity already exist, and they both are a pretty big deal to a lot of folks. But similarly, they are not terribly important to some folks.....to each their own

    I say, you pick your fights. I'd say it's quite possible that there are some completely content people out there, with happy full lives, that are not familiar with, nor ever give a thought to Macbeth.....yet can tell you the names and stats of the Seahawks starting line up.

    Who am I to judge what is important? I'd ignore those that think they get to judge and teach my kids to do the same.

    I really do think that this all just boils down to parents worrying about whether or not they are messing up. The answer.....42!!! Just kidding.....but YES! You will mess up....and you will do great......get over it!!!
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  7. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by aselvarial View Post

    When Tech wants to learn about religion, we'll have him read Dune. Or Pratchett. Or Gaiman. Or watch Stargate. Or Star Wars. Heck, DS:9 or B5 would be worthy of a study on the topic of religion alone. :-)

    My opinion from the geek culture. :-)
    Star Wars would be an excellent introduction to religion. There are so many religious references in the movie, it is crazy.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  8. #27

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    My son's are watching the Bill Moyers interview of Joseph Campbell. The Power of Myth. My budding-writer-son, particularly, is enjoying it.
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  9. #28

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    Oh, I am old. I took typing. I remember taking it in summer school so that I didn't have to spend an entire semester typing QWERTY for days on end. Though my dad brought home a computer in the early 80s, before anyone thought of a desktop computer. My mom thought it was a waste, but I was learning how to program in those early years and it eventually paid off. I remember it hooked up to the TV set and had programming cartridges. We didn't even have a floppy drive until later, when I needed something to save my work.

    Oh and we are teaching it all right now. We watch sports and encourage him to play, as he can, if he wants. We are teaching DS the finer points of card-based, RPGs, preparing him to play D&D. Watch/read Harry Potter, Star Wars, Dr. Who, Shakespeare, as well as introductions to the crazy sports the Olympics. We obsess over Disney and learn about the original fairy tales that Disney took from.

    Much to our dismay DS is becoming a Seahawks fan because he likes the mascot. But we are living in Seahawks country, so it can't be helped.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  10. #29

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    Mariam, have you ever watched the show Babylon 5? There is an INSANE amount of religion. It deals with multiple different species' religions. Star Wars is awesome, but most of the religious focus is "the force". Babylon 5 is soooo much more varied. Of course, it is a tv show with 5 seasons worth of material to put forth and not just a few movies. If you want to study how religion actually develops and drives cultures, THAT is the show to watch. Star Trek: Deep Space 9 is pretty good as well, but B5 is hands down the best written sci-fi show ever. When Tech is a little older we will probably have him watch it (in one of our yearly re-watches) and hit on a lot of the ways it deals with religion and belief.

  11. #30

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    I have never been able to get into Babylon 5. I have read great things, not just religion, but also it addresses gender and race issues too. I might need to try it again.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

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What happens when you *don't* raise your kids to be religious- Lit and culture