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  1. #1

    Default I need community

    Well, we moved from a bigger city to a small town, and I am having the damnedest time finding other secular homeschoolers. I came from a place with a fairly sizable secular, or at least inclusive, community. I have met three homeschoolers here so far, and all of them appear to be of the "pray over your snack at the park, Jesus rode the dinos curriculum user" type. Not surprisingly, we haven't had a park playdate with them since.

    There is no park day here, and doesn't appear to be much interest. There is a park day an hour away. I would only be interested in organizing one if I could find some like minded individuals. There is no HS group that organizes field trips. I have my kids enrolled in a HS gymnastics class, and it seems a couple of the moms might be potential friends, just not sure yet. Not yet old enough for 4-H, not interested in Boy Scouts, going to play soccer on one of the local school teams- but not for another 3 weeks.

    I guess the upshot is that I AM MISSING MY COMMUNITY! And although I know these things take time, I am doubtful that I am going to find a robust community here. So really, two things:

    1. I want to complain (accomplished)

    2. How do those of you that live in areas with no other (or very few other) secular homeschoolers do it? What's the secret?
    Homeschooling my boys, 5 and 8.

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  3. #2

    Default

    Hugs, I feel you!
    Mom to 5 great kids~

  4. #3

    Default

    We don't do homeschooling groups. I have started finding activities that public school kids do. Timing is not great, but there are too many things to overlook it.

    We just signed up for the boys & girls club to try out. Very cheap and lots of free play for the year. It is from 3-6pm. We are just adjusting our schedule accordingly. We go to the pool once a week and we have play time a couple of times a week with a couple of friends. DS is interested in starting a DIY.org face-to-face group.

    For the future I am thinking about checking out organized sports, karate or music lessons. I am finding that there are so many activities for PS kids that provide similar opportunities for getting together that I am not worrying about not finding hs groups.
    Last edited by Mariam; 09-01-2016 at 09:48 AM. Reason: typos!
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  5. #4

    Default

    I relentlessly stalk fb groups for park day meetups. I have an only child that does not enjoy any kind of structured, adult-designed activity, so casual park meetups are critical if he is ever going to make friends.

    Do you do facebook? You might have some luck poking around there for homeschool groups.

  6. #5

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    In my experience, public school kids/families are more welcoming of non-religious homeschoolers than Religious hsers are of non-religious hsers. I've also found that my kids are more comfortable with public school kids.....jesus talk just never comes up, only fun stuff that kids like to talk about.

    I'm with Mariam. In our small town, we didn't find our social groove till we took the word "homeschool" out of the equation when finding activities.

    And the funny thing is.....you might be more likely to find other secular homeschoolers, like yourself, hiding out at the traditionally public school activities that Mariam suggested! LOL!!!
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  7. #6

    Default

    Like Mariam, my children are involved in one or two after school activities (drama classes and library activities). However, they would love to find HS'd friends but it has been a challenge and is getting even more difficult as they get older. I truly believe there are almost no secular HS'ers in our area.I have looked everywhere - including talking to strangers with children who are out during school hours; but they are all religious.

    I recently spoke on the phone with a woman who HS's (and is on a local yahoo group I am part of) and as soon as she found out we were not Xtian, she couldn't get off the phone fast enough. It was as if she was afraid the devil was going to grab her through the phone line! I wouldn't want to hang out with her anyway...I had a difficult time keeping my mouth closed when she said her daughters, who were over 18, couldn't go to college like their brothers because they needed to stay home under the watch and guidance of their father - ugh! Sorry to get OT a bit!
    homeschooled 4th through 8th grade - currently in public high school 10th grade
    Dumplett (girl - age 15) and Wombat (boy - age 15)

  8. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by muddylilly View Post
    In my experience, public school kids/families are more welcoming of non-religious homeschoolers than Religious hsers are of non-religious hsers. I've also found that my kids are more comfortable with public school kids.....jesus talk just never comes up, only fun stuff that kids like to talk about.
    My children haven't been able to form friendships with the PS kids either. I am not sure if it is because the PS children are too busy with school and activities, they are into sports and my children are not, or because their parents do not agree with our HS'ing so they are not open to the friendships. Maybe a bit of all three or maybe we are just too weird!
    homeschooled 4th through 8th grade - currently in public high school 10th grade
    Dumplett (girl - age 15) and Wombat (boy - age 15)

  9. #8
    Senior Member Arrived ejsmom's Avatar
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    Default

    Honestly we drive almost an hour to meet with our group. And our group has people from like 5 counties in it. We all drive, and meet in the middle. But we found our tribe and that makes it worth it.
    homeschooling one DS, age 13.

  10. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ejsmom View Post
    Honestly we drive almost an hour to meet with our group. And our group has people from like 5 counties in it. We all drive, and meet in the middle. But we found our tribe and that makes it worth it.
    I'm glad to hear a long distance group can work.
    I've recently joined a meetup group on the northside of Chicago - about an hour away (in good traffic). So far we haven't gone to the functions because they've been for little kids, preschool through 2nd grade. But i am hopeful we will meet other families with middle or high schoolers.
    homeschooled 4th through 8th grade - currently in public high school 10th grade
    Dumplett (girl - age 15) and Wombat (boy - age 15)

  11. #10

    Default

    I'm going to be not much help as well, that's one of the reasons we are moving. However, plenty of ppl here drive an hour for homeschooling functions (or more), but, here, 10 miles to the store is considered a quick trip to the store. Also, we are enrolling Tech in this once we complete the move. It's designed for PS kids which is a good fit for our nocturnal family. http://www.creativekidsontherise.com/ Maybe look for something like that? Ironically, it will be farther from us once we move, but by the time Tech was old enough, we were well into the house hunt and I didn't want to add anything else to our plate.

    I say a one hour drive one day a week for a park day isn't a bad deal. Sure, it's not LOCAL, but...one day a week is better than nothing yeah?

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