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Thread: Roll Call, 1/28

  1. #1

    Default Roll Call, 1/28

    Roll Call, 1/28
    sunshine.jpg
    I need some sunshine!!!! This is our 7th cloudy day in a row, with at least another week forecast of the same. Send some my way??

    Speaking of sunshine, the seed/gardening catalogs have started to arrive in the mail. Time to start planning what to plant! We have given up on most root-based veggies (onions, carrots, turnips) because our soil is so full of clay, the plants either taste weird or rot. But we always do tomatoes, pickles, beans, snow peas, zukes, okra, giant pumpkins, and all kinds of peppers. We also have strawberries and raspberries year to year. And of course, all kinds of flowers. This is what our garden looks like in late summer:
    Garden.jpg

    We typically plant after Mother's Day and the garden is finished by Halloween. I know some of you are blessed with a much longer growing season. Have plans for a garden this coming year? Do you involve your kids? How?
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
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    A friend of mine posted on FB that it felt like January 76th. I'm ready for warmer temps and green things, but first the wind - ugh.

    Beautiful garden, Inmom! Hang in there with the cloudy days.

    Last year was not a good garden year. It was a cool, wet spring followed by a hot summer. The irrigation ditch that runs through our property was not flowing as often as usual and I hate, hate using city drinking water to water the garden. Living in a desert makes me mindful of my usage and the cost of watering vs. the benefit of what I was growing was just not worth it. I abandoned the garden in the late summer.

    I enjoy my perennials - grapes, artichokes, rhubarb, blackberries, fruit trees, some herbs and flowers. I'll probably plant my usual - okra, Armenian cucumber, eggplant, maybe a melon of some sort, and maybe a tomato. Whatever I plant has to be able to take the heat, because I'm done fighting it. This year I need to put in some time doing upkeep, pulling a few plants and planting one more fruit tree and some more artichokes. I will do a fall garden sometimes - beets, turnips, spinach - I like that it requires less water and the bugs have gone. One year I had spinach under plastic growing until January!

    We are getting back into the swing of things this week - DD is feeling better and I feel more organized. She still has been missing swim (which I think she'll be ready mid-February to go back to) and she has not been back to her classes at Temple, but will start those back up Sunday. I'm so glad we homeschool, it has given her time to recover and for her lungs to get stronger before going back to the germ pool
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

  4. #3

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    Our garden has not been much of a focus this year as we have been busy building retaining walls. We have grown various greens (mainly spinach, kale, gai lan, and pak choy), carrots, beetroot, some sort of pumpkins and beans (I planted multiple varieties and don't know what ones survived), corn, strawberries, black and red currants, raspberries, blackberries, and logan berries. Our figs are just ripening. We don't have many as the tree is still small, but they are a nice treat.

    Lemons and limes are coming along well. Mandarins and oranges are growing well but not fruiting well yet. Pears (2 trees) look ok but may have brown spot. Plum (greengage) is just young and currently in a pot, I need to get it in the garden and espalier it. Feijoas have lots of flowers so hopefully we will have lots of fruit later on.

    Having issues with one grape (it has gray mold), blueberries (slowly being killed by bacterial blight; down to 6 plants from 10), one apple (all the fruit has large cracks, but the other 7 trees are ok), and peaches and nectarines (have leaf curl). Cranberries have never fruited but I will try planting them in a different location. The apricot has never fruited properly and I have had it 10 years so it is coming out and getting mulched so I can plant something else in its space.
    New Zealand-based freelance science copyeditor. Homeschooling DD 11 (year 7) and DD 6 (year 2).

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    But we always do tomatoes, pickles, beans, snow peas, zukes, okra, giant pumpkins, and all kinds of peppers.
    What is a zuke is that short for zucchini?

    Your garden looks idyllic. What animal(s) are kept out by the fence? We don't have anything eating our garden so do not need to worry about fencing. I get a lot of insect pests but the birds seem to deal to them well enough to not bother our plant health too much. My main issue is various fungal and bacterial infections of plants.
    New Zealand-based freelance science copyeditor. Homeschooling DD 11 (year 7) and DD 6 (year 2).

  6. #5

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    What a beautiful garden! Too early to start ours here in Massachusetts but I did put together a small indoor greenhouse last night to get things started.

    Hi Everyone! I'm new to the forum and not, as of yet, a homeschooler. I am a mom to an almost 12 year old son who is bright, funny and creative but also happens to have mild autism and ADHD. I joined the forum because I am very concerned that the public school system is not adequately preparing my son for the next level (ex. college) both academically and from a life skills perspective. Unfortunately, he LOVES going to public school. Despite his diagnoses, he is an extrovert, very gregarious and loves being around lots of people. I have joined this forum because I want to supplement the "one-size-fits-all" education he is getting, set up a structured program for summer vacation and prepare for the day when he decides he is done with the public school. I look forward to getting to know folks and learning a lot!

  7. #6

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    RTB: It's good to hear that your daughter is feeling better. Did she have to do any respiratory therapy to increase lung function? Just wondered since she wants to go back to swimming. Also, have you considered using "gray water"? Saving dish washing water from the sink, bath water, etc to water plants? My SIL even has her washing machine set to drain the water into a laundry tub that she stoppers up and uses the water to hydrate her plants.

    NZ_Mama, Yes, it's zucchini. I love the flowers in front of my garden. I save the flower seeds year to year. From the house, it hides the fact that I can't always keep up on the weeds in the garden proper. The flowers get 3-3.5" tall. The 4 foot high fence is mostly to keep deer out. It really doesn't do much for rabbits, and the raccoons like the compost pile that is inside but seem to leave the rest of it alone. As our fruit trees ripen, we also put fencing around those so the deer don't eat the fruit.

    And a recent bit of news--more handwashing and handwashing around here. An (as of right now) unconfirmed case of coronavirus is in our county, see here. And I was worried that DH may bring it home because of all the travel he does through large international airports!!
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  8. #7
    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    RTB: It's good to hear that your daughter is feeling better. Did she have to do any respiratory therapy to increase lung function? Just wondered since she wants to go back to swimming. Also, have you considered using "gray water"? Saving dish washing water from the sink, bath water, etc to water plants? My SIL even has her washing machine set to drain the water into a laundry tub that she stoppers up and uses the water to hydrate her plants.

    And a recent bit of news--more handwashing and handwashing around here. An (as of right now) unconfirmed case of coronavirus is in our county, see here. And I was worried that DH may bring it home because of all the travel he does through large international airports!!
    No, no specific therapy. They did give her an inhaler, which she uses from time to time when feeling wheezy. They said that pneumonia does not result in any increase of asthma (unlike RSV, which DS had as a baby), so that is good.

    The house we lived in before, we used gray water. It had a great set up. This house, is not as user friendly for that. Our garden is our front yard, and baths / laundry and in the back and down stairs. However I would probably be able to skip the gym entirely if I wanted to haul buckets of water up stairs and through the house!

    We've been closely following the coronavirus at our house. I love epidemiology and DS is really into it. It will be interesting on what the WHO decided today at their meeting. The NYT Editorial Board had a nice article today that I think highlights part of the problem we will have moving forward with coronvirus or any other outbreak https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/29/o...-outbreak.html
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by RTB View Post
    We've been closely following the coronavirus at our house. I love epidemiology and DS is really into it. It will be interesting on what the WHO decided today at their meeting. The NYT Editorial Board had a nice article today that I think highlights part of the problem we will have moving forward with coronvirus or any other outbreak https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/29/o...-outbreak.html
    I don't mean to make light of the situation, but I can't help thinking we should check the Pandemic Board Game from our local library again and try to "save the world."
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  10. #9
    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    I don't mean to make light of the situation, but I can't help thinking we should check the Pandemic Board Game from our local library again and try to "save the world."
    Ha! I know what you mean. I've been making my kids do the math for the outbreak - just to put it in perspective.
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

  11. #10

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    Oh, garden planning! I've had a string of bad luck the last few years - wildfires, record rain, escape pigs. We're in a new house with a new garden, but the bad luck continues. I shall not post photos of the six salvaged bathtubs, representing every home trend from clawfoot to 70s pea green to 80s pinkish-white jet. The previous owner used them as raised garden beds. There are four additional utility tubs in the greenhouse, used in similar fashion, and - inexplicably - each one is nicer than the utility tub that resides in the house. Inside, we were gifted houseplants... which also came with the gift of fungus gnats and scale. I'm in contain, isolate and decontaminate mode. It feels pandemic-y. Gotta get this crap under control before seeds arrive in the post.
    Home schooled two kiddos from a remote location for seven years. DD16 has transitioned to public high school. DS8 tried PS, but likes home schooling better.

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Roll Call, 1/28