Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1

    Default Roll Call, 11/25

    So it's now Thanksgiving week for the U.S. I've been doing a little reading about Thanksgiving traditions, both in the U.S. and elsewhere and have found the differences interesting. For example, I've heard that the Canadian version is much more relaxed and less "let's have everybody over." The UK version is also low-key and a hold-over from the Saxons giving thanks for the harvest. India's is a festival four days long!! In some cases, countries instituted a thanksgiving day as a result of the temporary American forces occupation after WW II.

    This is really good article about the huge misconceptions we teach our U.S, children about thanksgiving. At the time of the original Plymouth meal, only about 12 sentences total were written about it. It was highly fictionalized in the the mid- late-1800s. I am guilty of teaching these things, in a simple way, when my kids were small We had to revise these when we read through history books like A History of US or Zinn's history when they were in middle and high school!

    What do you teach your kids about Thanksgiving? What do you DO for Thanksgiving?
    Last edited by inmom; 11-25-2019 at 12:23 PM.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  2. T4L In Forum Dec19
  3. #2
    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NM
    Posts
    1,290

    Default

    4 Days!? Wow. I imagine it's celebrated with food - and that is a lot of work. I'd wimp out by day 2.

    My kids have a general understanding of the real Thanksgiving - mostly from Howard Zinn. But, we've yet to really dive into it because we haven't studied American History extensively (yet). I'm happy to do away with the traditional narrative, but would still like to keep the holiday (I know some don't). As my oldest pointed out, everything evolves - even our understanding of holidays and the way or reasons they are celebrated.

    This year my mom is hosting. We are a small group, my family, my mom, and MIL. It is pretty easy going. I'm bringing stuffing, rolls, a brie wrapped in filo with jam (thanks Costco!), annnddd - I think that's it, guess I better double check that. No one likes turkey much, it's an obligation food. Last year my mom bought a turkey breast from Trader Joe's that comes wrapped in filo dough, it was tasty and just enough for the 6 of us. We are doing the same this year.

    I'm very excited for a 4 day weekend. We have one dinner with friends planned (their house). No club swim, no high school swim, no classes, no dinner guests. I can't remember the last time our schedule was so empty - it's magical - lol! Introvert heaven

    Carol, are your kids going to come home?
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

  4. #3

    Default

    Rebecca, enjoy the quiet long weekend. I'm sure a few days where you don't have to be somewhere or do something will be restful!

    Our Thanksgiving is typically small this year--my parents, an 80 y.o. neighbor couple, and our son. DD says she's staying in Iowa City and will volunteer at a shelter serving a Thanksgiving meal and/or join a friend's family. I'm still very worried about her, as she's not doing well mentally, but we have to keep plugging along.

    Next year DS will be in North Carolina, and while he will be working for a tech company with "unlimited vacation time", we all know the new guy won't be able to take many days around holidays off. So DH and I are considering an on-the-road Thanksgiving next year. The current idea is New Orleans!
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  5. #4

    Default

    And then theres the UltraSpiritual summary of Thanksgiving: https://youtu.be/0EGj180LjvM

    Ours is also modest, just the family and MIL. Right now Im making gravy (aka turkey stock, will gravify it thursday) and made croutons for dressing, and made two batches of cranberry sauce (the first one didnt taste good yesterday). Dessert is still a mystery for us, Grama will provide MegaMart’s best precooked pumpkin pie, its up to me if I want to add anything else. (Also making spinach and feta casserole as my “green” dish, and the roasted sweet potato and pineapple “orange” dish.) Oooh and I brought out a Paula Dean recipe for sweet potato biscuits, will try those if Im feeling ambitious on Thursday.

    Yay for small gatherings, and sorry to hear your DD wont be with you this year, Inmom.

    Im also not sure how to deal with the archaic storyline of the native and pilgrim communities coming together to share a harvest meal. The boys are told about how unfairly the people living here first were treated, but its the story of different people coming together that seems the real spirit of the occasion. Maybe the elementary kids doing these pageants could have more historically accurate costumes, and the scripts could be scrubbed to be in line with modern zeitgeist, but the message of community seems a good one.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  6. #5
    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NM
    Posts
    1,290

    Default

    @Inmom - I've always wanted to travel for Thanksgiving, to get away from the rush, and relax. NO sounds like a great destination for that. I'm sorry about your DD. I can imagine how stressful this is for you. Sending you hugs and light.

    @AM - I'm usually never a fan of store bought pie, it's too sweet. But my mom picked up a pecan pie from Whole Foods last year and it was pretty decent. So if you hit the cooking wall, there is always semi-decent, overpriced Whole Foods pie!
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

  7. #6

    Default

    We always enjoyed going to Vegas for Thanksgiving - less expensive, less crowds, and no reservations needed to visit some really nice restaurants. (We spent the days hiking around, we arent drink and gambling kinda people.)
    But New Orleans sounds fun, too.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  8. #7

    Default

    Hope you all have a lovely Thanksgiving.

    We are all good here. Just winding stuff up for the end of the year. Filed DD6's homeschool exemption application today. Hopefully it all works out next year. DD11 got offered a place in the one-day school but we turned it down for various reasons (cost, day clash with the only homeschool group activities she attends, she did not like the class environment when we visited, commute time). So it will be a juggle. But hopefully a net positive.
    Last edited by NZ_Mama; 11-27-2019 at 01:51 AM.
    New Zealand-based. DD 11 (year 6 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 6 (year 1 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

    That's a kea (NZ parrot) in my avatar. You can learn about them on Beak & Brain - Genius Birds from Down Under on Netflix.

  9. #8
    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NM
    Posts
    1,290

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NZ_Mama View Post
    Hope you all have a lovely Thanksgiving.

    We are all good here. Just winding stuff up for the end of the year. Filed DD6's homeschool exemption application today. Hopefully it all works out next year. DD11 got offered a place in the one-day school but we turned it down for various reasons (cost, day clash with the only homeschool group activities she attends, she did not like the class environment when we visited, commute time). So it will be a juggle. But hopefully a net positive.
    So you'll homeschool both girls next year? When does summer break start for you - any special plans?
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

  10. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RTB View Post
    So you'll homeschool both girls next year? When does summer break start for you - any special plans?
    Yes both homeschooling next year.

    DD11 will finish up her last Beast Academy chapter next week. Then we will take another week to do some tidying up of loose ends, pre-tests for next year, and writing up a summary of what she liked this term/would like to do next year.

    Summer break will be about 7 weeks. Lots of enjoying summer at the beach, hiking, and camping, and I will try fit in some horse treks (my riding skills have not progressed this term as I have only had the chance to ride on 3/7 weeks so far).
    New Zealand-based. DD 11 (year 6 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 6 (year 1 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

    That's a kea (NZ parrot) in my avatar. You can learn about them on Beak & Brain - Genius Birds from Down Under on Netflix.

  11. #10

    Default

    Since I have the week off from teaching, we are spending lots of family time, though we are not traveling to see extended family.

    We are watching movies, playing games and cooking lots of good food. We will cook a turkey tomorrow, a couple of days later than planned. I hope to make some tamales this week and stock up on some soup.

    For the history of Thanksgiving, we have been pretty honest about it from the beginning (with age-appropriate examples). Just a couple of days ago we watched Avatar movie (the James Cameron version). I had never seen it before and I knew it was anti-colonial, but it was much more powerful than I expected.

    In fact the next day DS asked about it. And was a great example of European colonization of the Americas. We talked about how the only difference was the ending. In Avatar, the local population were able to expel the colonizers whereas in the Americas, Europeans killed 90% of the Native American population and that the Europeans never left.

    I have been very forthcoming whose land we live on. I plan for us to learn some of the indigenous language too. (It is taught at the local college, so I have lots of resources). The history of the local tribe is all around us, so I focus on that instead of the explorers who passed through here and are who the local college is named after. At work I am insufferable, as I keep mentioning that we should rename our college after the well-known natives and not the explorers. But that is a story for another day.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 12-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
Roll Call, 11/25