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Thread: Roll Call, 2/21

  1. #11
    Senior Member Enlightened
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeWill View Post
    I feel like I'm still stumbling through homeschool, even considering new curriculums. My head is spinning! Where I live, the majority of homeschoolers uses CC. It would be easy to go that route because there is so much support, but I didn't want to. I like doing my own thing, and it has proven to be the more difficult road to go down. I think that once we get through this first year, I will have a better idea of what works and what doesn't. And then it will change, right?
    We like doing our own thing too. I have an only and pulled him out the winter break of first grade and now we are doing fourth grade. Starting out, I remember it being really hard to know what I was doing, but as we went along, we started to find our groove. It took us a while and it's a continual process, but I don't think anything really compares with being able to teach your own children, pass on your values and watch them grow. As Inmom said, it's so worth it!
    Homeschooling an only, DS10

    How should we like it were stars to burn
    With a passion for us we could not return?
    If equal affection cannot be,
    Let the more loving one be me.

    W. H. Auden

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  3. #12
    Senior Member Enlightened
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    Quote Originally Posted by NZ_Mama View Post
    I am just really over critical people who are against homeschooling or have no idea why you parent the way you do or homeschool or whatever. My mum is in super critical mode and changes her argument to suit the situation. Like previously it was all "oh you could never homeschool...who would teach her how to read...are you getting her to sit down and do at least 30 min of writing a day...are you sure you can go out and do X activity; has she done her math for the day...you have to write a end of year report for DD10 and give her assessments.." and so on and so on. Now when I say that DD5 has had no real reading or math instruction yet and they are 3 weeks into the year, or that she chose the other day to spend all morning on "playground" as her action station (which I don't actually think is a bad thing but I was saying it as an example of school is not exactly doing all she expected me to do with DD5), its "oh that's fine...it's not all about academics and achievement...I'm not like you, I'm not focused on the achievement".
    NZ, my mom does this. I think it's irrational and unfair to try to argue a point by continually shifting the point of contention. The other thing she and my dad used to do was to wait till I wasn't in the room and then talk to DS and try to pressure him to go back to school. Later, he would tell me about it. So except for holidays and birthdays, we just didn't see them, even though we live close. She's coming around now, hinting at scheduling some time together on the week days, but our compromise is that we just don't talk about homeschooling.

    Same with some new friends that we've made in the neighborhood. The parents might ask the first time where DS goes to school. I tell them that we homeschool, and then we just don't talk about it. From the looks I get, I know this choice is completely alien to them and they don't get it. But after a while, they realize that we're just normal people like them. Parenting today is often a lonely business, whether we public school or homeschool, so they were often glad that we asked their kids to play.
    Homeschooling an only, DS10

    How should we like it were stars to burn
    With a passion for us we could not return?
    If equal affection cannot be,
    Let the more loving one be me.

    W. H. Auden

  4. #13
    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    DH and I go all out for this party. This year's menu, you ask....?

    Appetizers:

    Mini crawfish pies
    Mardi gras salad (cold combo of peas, peppers, celery, onions, pimentoes, french cut beans with a vinegar/sugar/oil dressing)
    Oysters Bienville or Rockefeller

    Meal:

    Black-eyed pan jambalya
    Po Boy or Muffaletta
    Okra Creole
    Cajun Coubion (a red fish based dish served over rice)
    Chicken and Sausage Gumbo
    Shrimp and Grits

    Dessert:

    King Cake bread pudding w/ Whiskey sauce (we order the king cake from a New Orleans bakery and have it shipped, Then I make it into this killer dessert)

    Drinks of various kinds, but primarily Abita Beer and hurricanes

    Oh my gosh! Sounds amazing! You must be cooking for days. Are you able to make some ahead of time?
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

  5. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by RTB View Post
    Oh my gosh! Sounds amazing! You must be cooking for days. Are you able to make some ahead of time?
    About a third of it can be made the day before, but we do spend most of Saturday dicing and cooking. It's totally worth it, though. Lots of good food, fun friends, stories and laughs.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  6. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by RTB View Post
    We've been listening to a dramatized version of A Midsummer Night's Dream while we each read along with our own copy. It has been a hit with both kids. I've enjoyed it too, it has been relaxing. We see the play the following Monday. I will definitely put it on the plan for next school year - at least a couple of times.
    I think doing something like that really helps kids understand Shakespeare. When my daughter read through the plays, she'd get a version at the library that had the original play as written by Shakespeare on the left page with a translation of sorts on the right page. Then we'd get movies of the play to watch afterwards. (I love Kenneth Branaugh doing Shakespeare!!)
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  7. #16

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    Roll Call, 2/21
    Wow an invitation! Thanks! He menu looks yummy.

    We are starting Midsummer Night’s Dream Monday! Im so anxious about not messing up DS’s first intro to Shakespeare. Our charter gave us a “No Fear” version which has the original and the modern translations next to each other as Inmom describes.
    F2452353-235D-462E-A98D-15FAF2032F7B.jpeg
    I also have the LEGO comic book version, if he still doesnt like it. My favorite movie version is the Kevin Kline Victorian adaptation, over the Merle Oberlin sort of creepy black and white one.
    A live performance sounds awesome cool!
    RTB what dramatized reading are you listening to?

    Vicsmom... yes, its been weirdly cold here! Im not used to storms, storms coming in from the west, or such cold weather in general. Polar vortex indeed!

    NZmama - Im glad to hear youre back riding again! Sorry about the mother troubles. Shes not wntitled to make you unhappy. Good luck getting her out of your head.

    Deewill, enjoy your peaceful mornings! Before the kids are up is my quiet time too.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  8. #17

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    Is teaching Shakespeare an expected thing in the US? I honestly do not remember doing any in highschool. Maybe we did? English is one class I seriously zoned out of.

    I think this will be an area of future homeschool teaching that will worry me a little as I have zero interest in or knowledge of Shakespeare, and I think it is something that needs to be learned with someone who is interested in it. Hopefully we can find an online class if we get to that stage.

    DD10 has read some of the intro type books over the past couple of years. She liked some that were comic versions (Mr William Shakespeare's Plays and Bravo Mr Shakespeare by Marcia Willams). Her favorite was The Tempest.

    I hope you all have fun with your Shakespeare teaching/watching.
    New Zealand-based. DD 11 (year 6 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 6 (year 1 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

    That's a kea (NZ parrot) in my avatar. You can learn about them on Beak & Brain - Genius Birds from Down Under on Netflix.

  9. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by NZ_Mama View Post
    Is teaching Shakespeare an expected thing in the US? I honestly do not remember doing any in highschool. Maybe we did? English is one class I seriously zoned out of.
    Most high school English classes in the US do include a year of either world literature or British literature. Usually at least one Shakespeare play would be covered in that year. I do enjoy English and literature and literary analysis but I could take or leave Shakespeare honestly. My honors world literature based 10th grade English class read Hamlet. I read MacBeth and Midsummer Night's Dream on my own out of curiosity. When I went to London as an adult, we looked around in the Globe Theater just to say we had but didn't have the time or interest to try and see a play. I feel like I gave it a good try but I'm just not a Shakespeare fan, there are so many other great plays and playwrights out there. We also read Cyrano de Bergerac in 10th grade as well and I LOVED (and still love to be honest) that play. We even went to see a live performance of it after we read it in class.

  10. #19

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    I think its sort of expected - part of the “classics” given to kids to assure they will never pick up a novel again in their lives. But I liked Midsummer Night’s Dream anyways, and like the other Shakespearan comedies. Russel T Davies (writer of Dr Who 2005, and I think Torchwood and some of my favorite Austen movies) made a recent adaptation of MSND, fixing some of the morally broken parts, and adding racial and sexual diversity. After we read the text and watch the 1999 version, I hope to watch this new one and get DS to write an essay comparing the more faithful version to the Davies one.

    I cant think of other elevated playwrights that write to something kids can understand, perhaps its an introduction to the genre?
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  11. #20

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    I remembered we did do some. It was Romeo and Juliet but just the Baz Luhrmann movie version.

    I also remember watching a performance of Midsummer Night’s Dream done by another school, but I think my mum took me to this rather than it being part of school work. I did like that.

    I don't know if we did much literature in English.

    It was the start of curriculum changes in NZ when I was in late high school and I think they were trying to "modernize" what they taught.
    New Zealand-based. DD 11 (year 6 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 6 (year 1 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

    That's a kea (NZ parrot) in my avatar. You can learn about them on Beak & Brain - Genius Birds from Down Under on Netflix.

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Roll Call, 2/21