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Thread: Greek Mythology

  1. #1

    Default Greek Mythology

    My daughter has been fascinated by Greek Mythology for several years. (She likes all mythology but Greek is her favorite.)
    Any book suggestions? She's read quite a few already, but I figured you all might know of some she hasn't read.
    TIA



    eta: I did a search prior to posting but didn't find anything. In one thread, someone mentioned a Greek Mythology game but didn't list the name of the game. So...if you know of a good Greek Mythology game, I would love to hear about it.
    homeschooled 4th through 8th grade - currently in public high school 10th grade
    Dumplett (girl - age 15) and Wombat (boy - age 15)

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  3. #2

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    Greek Mythology
    For fiction, has she gone through the Riordan books and the copycats?

    Would she like something that is a little more comparative, that shows the parallel myths between civilizations, hypothesizes about how a story morphed to suit the culture?
    Is she ready for some critical thinking?
    Heres my greek mythology half of the shelf...
    IMG_0105.JPG

    The World of Myth by Leeming compares myths by subject matter... here is from the table of contents:
    image.jpg

    And Black Spark, White Fire by Poe talks about the Egyptian influence over ancient Greece that made it so fantabulous. I remember it as being a bit biased, and with a bit of an agenda, but at the time I was mostly interested in the layers that greek mythology has.
    I think Joseph Campbell is weird, and I didnt like the anti-feminist versions of the myths as presented in Bulfinch's Mythology. Instead, I much preferred Robert Bell's "Women of Classical Mythology" and "Dictionary of Classical Mythology". Graves didnt do much for me, either.

    Anyways, those are a couple of more off-the-wall suggestions, for an interested person who has already done the intro level Moncrieff and random genericized greek mythology books.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  4. #3

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    Alexsmon,

    She's read all the Riordan books...several times.

    She enjoys comparing the myths between the cultures and how the stories morphed to fit the culture.
    I think she is ready for critical thinking

    Prior to posting I looked at World of Myth by Leeming. Several reviewers said the older version was best so I was considering purchasing a used copy of the 1991 book.


    Thank you for your opinion about Bulfinch's Mythology. I've put in it and out of my Amazon cart several times the past six months. She would not like an anti-feminist viewpoint.

    The Women of Classical Mythology looks great!

    Have you read Edith Hamilton's Mythology? It was originally published in 1942...wasn't sure how she would like it. I've read rave reviews and others saying it managed to make the subject boring.

    Thank you again!!



    eta: I took a closer look at your photos and saw the Hindu Gods book. My son was convinced he was reincarnated when he was little. (He didn't know the word..just called it his 'other lives'.) Then when he got older and learned a bit about the Hindu culture, he was convinced he was Hindu in his 'other life'.
    Last edited by dbsam; 12-18-2016 at 12:34 AM.
    homeschooled 4th through 8th grade - currently in public high school 10th grade
    Dumplett (girl - age 15) and Wombat (boy - age 15)

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbsam View Post
    Have you read Edith Hamilton's Mythology? It was originally published in 1942...wasn't sure how she would like it. I've read rave reviews and others saying it managed to make the subject boring.
    Hmm. My daughter loved Edith Hamilton's Mythology. In fact, she stole my copy and took it to college with her.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  6. #5

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    Dbsam: Sent you an email elsewhere with some material!
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  7. #6

    Default

    Both Bulfinch's and Hamilton's are good. But for a kid who has been into mythology for a long time, I doubt there will be much new there. They're still classics though. World of Myth is a great resource.

    She's a 7th grader and it sounds like she's a voracious reader so I'm thinking she might actually enjoy reading the actual Odyssey and Iliad.

    There are some good fiction books that are at a higher level. Adele Geras's Troy is good. Marion Zimmer Bradley has an adult book - Firebrand - about Cassandra that's quite good. There are other greek myth inspired literature books out there. You might go in that direction.

    Might she enjoy watching the old Joseph Campbell The Power of Myth series from PBS? You can find it streaming. And there are several Great Courses about mythology or classical mythology. One of my 7th graders is enjoying some of the Great Courses. There may also be a good MOOC.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

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  8. #7

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    farrarwilliams,

    She first got interested in mythology in third grade when she read Mary Pope Osborne's Tales from the Odyssey series.

    Thank you for the suggestions.
    I thought she might like reading the Odyssey and the Illiad. But I read them so long ago I wasn't sure if they would be too difficult for her.

    I believe our library has Great Courses. I need to go look.
    I had never heard of the PBS series but will look it up. I'll also have her check out the fiction books you mention.

    She does love to read, so thank you all for the suggestions. I may give them to her one at a time; when she is reading something she is interested in it can be difficult to get her to read anything else. Sometimes I am glad when she finishes the last book in a series!
    homeschooled 4th through 8th grade - currently in public high school 10th grade
    Dumplett (girl - age 15) and Wombat (boy - age 15)

  9. #8

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    The PBS series is old... it was a series of conversations between Joseph Campbell and Bill Moyers. It's sort of a classic. And it encapsulates Campbell's ideas about myths in four easy episodes. It would feel really dated now... but it holds up nicely in some ways too. It's like the classic Cosmos of the myth world.

    I read The Odyssey with middle schoolers one year. It was challenging for sure, but most of them were capable with structured help. I can't remember which translation I chose... it was ages ago, but I remember I liked one of the older ones for their comprehension.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

  10. #9

    Default

    Regarding reading the Odyssey or the Iliad--find translations are are simpler in presentation. The other thing my dd does with difficult texts (Homer and Shakespeare especially) is to find audio versions and either listen to it first, or read along in the text with it. It seems to help with comprehension and get past the "strangeness" of the speech patterns
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    Regarding reading the Odyssey or the Iliad--find translations are are simpler in presentation. The other thing my dd does with difficult texts (Homer and Shakespeare especially) is to find audio versions and either listen to it first, or read along in the text with it. It seems to help with comprehension and get past the "strangeness" of the speech patterns
    I like the idea of listening to it first. That's sort of how how my children prepared for the Tempest. We saw the play several times, performed several ways, before my daughter participated in Shakespeare drama camp and then performed in a modified version of the Tempest.

    My children see a language arts teacher once a week. The teacher suggested I get my daughter a version written for high schoolers.

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