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Thread: Steve Sheinkin

  1. #1
    IEF
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    Default Steve Sheinkin

    I think the age range is about right, there are just extenuating circumstances why I am reading "Bomb" to a younger child. It is well researched, gripping, and does not talk down to the reader.

    Because of the content and the political climate of the setting, I have had to stop and talk periodically to make sure that my younger child understands that the Soviet Union are not "the bad guys", that the scientists were all very young, and other details you might want to discuss with a tween or young teen who is reading independently. I would definitely advise reading along with your child in whatever way works for your family.

    I haven't read any of Mr.Sheinkin's other books but I intend to. He is a former textbook writer who describes himself as "repentant" for all the reasons outlined in "Lies My teacher Told Me".

    I'll probably edit this post when we finish the book today or tomorrow, but I know a lot of you have kids in this age range and I'm kind of excited about bumbling across something this good.

  2. T4L In Forum July19
  3. #2

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    Ooooh! Thanks IEF I'm heading to Barnes and Noble later this morning anyway. I'll look around a flip through a few of his. They look pretty interesting.
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  4. #3

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    I read it! It is in the hopper for dd when we get to WW2-ish

    Good companion to it would be Oliver Sack's childhood memoir, Uncle Tungsten. All things chemistry.
    Eclectically homeschooling 8th grade dd, who likes science as much as art...

  5. #4
    IEF
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    Finished the book.

    Mean mommy says required reading.

    More later.

  6. #5
    IEF
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    Steve Sheinkin
    Quote Originally Posted by fastweedpuller View Post
    I read it! It is in the hopper for dd when we get to WW2-ish

    Good companion to it would be Oliver Sack's childhood memoir, Uncle Tungsten. All things chemistry.
    Attaboy, Tony!

    Bert the Turtle

    Civil Defense Museum


  7. #6

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    I know you're my age: you wanna scare the poop out of him by having him watch The Day After with you? I was a sophomore in college and believe me I freaked the hell out. Granted I never wanted to repeat the experience so I never saw it again; knowing "our advanced years" I wonder if it even would hold up or if it would be cheesy
    Eclectically homeschooling 8th grade dd, who likes science as much as art...

  8. #7
    IEF
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    Yea, that's exactly what's going through my mind right now. Thanks for validating reality, FWP.

    I'm spooked and probably babbling too much family stuff right now. Some more obscure stuff that had a huge impact on me and might be of interest to your (more appropriately aged) kid are an obscure movie called "Insignifigance" which I can lend you if we can find a way to deal with the copyright and privacy issues that you're comfortable with, like snail mail to a P.O. box or something, and a novel by Joseph Krumgold called "Henry 3" that the reviewers see completely differently than I did and still do.

    I want to scare him. I need to scare him. He has a right to know--for the sake of our children's children's children's children's children's children's children.

  9. #8
    IEF
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    ETA: Alas, Babylon

    Do you know how to find that Twilight Zone episode about the intercontinental ballistic missile designer's daughter who somehow got sent into a bomb shelter designed for a huge team of scientists all by herself when she was a preschooler right before They Fell and then had to live out her entire life Down There with all of her physical needs taken care of but with the horrible knowledge that she was the only remaining member of the human race or was that a Twilight Zone episode at or or just a recurring nightmare I had that I later thought was a Twilight Zone episode because it was easier to deal with that way and is it sick and offensive that I am so, so, so, glad that it didn't turn out to be my destiny?

  10. #9

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    Well there is something to be said for the obvious fact that the most researched and written about parts of human history are concerning war and conflict.

    No sense burying one's head in the sand.
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  11. #10

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    Not saying at all that you *need* to scare him. Global warming should do for them what ICBMs did for us as kids methinks. There's always a monster. That's like the first lesson in Mythology101

    I read Nevil Shute's On the Beach waaayyyy too early (14?) and it kind of scarred me. But then again I read Stephen King's The Stand about that same time. So I can't really say anything to dd when she chooses to read Hunger Games and Maze Runner for her fun reads, I chose the same kinds of things to read (admittedly it wasn't kids killing kids which seems to be an especial YA trope nowadays)
    Eclectically homeschooling 8th grade dd, who likes science as much as art...

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Steve Sheinkin