View Poll Results: How much food...

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  • We dont cook, so will be SOL once the granola bars and ice cream are gone.

    0 0%
  • We are Konmari minimalists. So, about a week before we got hungry.

    9 31.03%
  • We go to Costco like some go to church. We could probably survive about a month.

    13 44.83%
  • We take prepping seriously. Months, if not years worth, are in our closets and garage.

    5 17.24%
  • We are mostly self-sufficient here. We have a productive garden, chickens, goats, enough to get by.

    2 6.90%
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  1. #21

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    I hadnt even thought of how frugal = buying in bulk, therefore a *prepping* stockpile. I feel like Ive only recently graduated to baking enough to warrant the 25# bags of flour and sugar.
    What about the bulk bins in the no-nabisco/fritolay-grocers?

    I wonder if pantries are smaller in places that expect you to buy fresh food nearly-daily? So if theres a correllation smaller pantry = bigger fresh local market?

    Except for TFZs case. Isnt Florida supposed to be full of old people, who save everything? In southern CA, we dont have storage attics or basements, either.

    What are peoples bug-out plans?
    There are three ways out of San Diego (other than south)... I went one night to see the Leonids meteorshower from the eastern mountains (such was the plan)... and the freeway at 11:30pm was a solid line of similarly minded people heading east. No accidents, just too many people. The quiet mountain road we had thought to use was a solid line of cars.
    In case of an actual evacuation - I figure theres no chance in hell we could be away in a timely manner. I never would have even expected it to be such an impossibility.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

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  3. #22
    Senior Member Arrived ejsmom's Avatar
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    I have a pantry and a basement and what I think of as "standard" kitchen, and our house was built in 2010. But cooking is important to us and we put the money into our kitchen when we built rather than upgraded lighting or flooring (we upgrade those as we find what we like/things wear out.) I don't think my kitchen is large or fancy, though.

    I do have a lot of storage, I suppose, but that's mainly due to having an island and a pot rack. One thing I did in our first house that I continue to do (and will going forward because it's so space saving and convenient) is to put up a pot rack and hang those up out of the way. Easy to put away, easy to access, saves a ton of cupboard space. The only pots and pans I have in a cupboard are 2 ceramic nonstick pans I use for eggs and one big stockpot/steamer. For around $100 I got a stainless pot rack (to match my cookware) that mounts against the wall and has 2 shelves above it. On one shelf I have jars of staples like beans, popcorn, sugar, etc. And decorative stuff on the upper shelf. I have an extra S-hook for aprons, too, to save our clothing. I was throwing out a lot of tops from grease splatter stains. I also put those over the door storage racks on the inside of the pantry door, and took out the standard builder shelves and added new ones - floor to ceiling.

    Bug out plan? Drive back roads and get away. It depends how far I have to go. I have Amish friends, prepper friends (who have a remote cabin), and family an hour or two away or so if need be. I have family 2 hours away, 8 hours away, and 20 hours away, too.
    Last edited by ejsmom; 05-25-2016 at 04:02 PM.
    homeschooling one DS, age 13.

  4. #23

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    Our house was built in 1992 and we have pretty good storage. We are the only owners but did not design the house - it was a spec house for a parade of homes so maybe the builder put in some extras. I think part of the reason the house is laid out nicely is because it was built by a woman builder. She thought about how the house will be lived in.

    e.g. The house plans called for a kitchen island, but she decided the space would be better used as a large walk-in pantry. For us, this works well. She also put linen closets in the bathrooms, large closets with custom organizers in the bedrooms (her husband was a wood-worker), two small walk-in closets in the playroom. We use one for Xmas decorations and one for games and toys, etc.
    Unfortunately, she didn't care about the garage...it is so shallow my husband's truck cannot fit in the garage

    In our area basements are standard. In hind sight, we should not have finished the entire basement. If we ever move, we will keep a portion of the basement unfinished for storage.
    Last edited by dbsam; 05-25-2016 at 01:33 PM.
    finished 8th grade (our fifth year homeschooling)
    Dumplett (girl - age 14) and Wombat (boy - age 14)

  5. #24

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    AM, I think bug out plans are for city/suburban folk You know, when you start to see the zombies at the mall..... LOL!!

    Seriously though...under what circumstances would one "bug out"? If it were fire or hurricane....the routes, I would think, would be dictated by authorities. Ask the folks in Houston or New Orleans how that was. Otherwise...say earthquake, flooding, zombie or foreign invaders ....you just might be screwed. LOL...but then, so will everyone else.

    You said, "I hadnt even thought of how frugal = buying in bulk, therefore a *prepping* stockpile." I assumed that's why you asked originally. It's all a big circle anyway....."prepping" (which is what it's called now, though I like preparedness as a term cause that's what it always was considered) is the outward appearance that comes from buying/storing/gardening/canning in bulk, which doing so is frugal, which all makes you more self reliant, which is what most folks used to be without being called "self-reliant" or "green" or "preppers". Not necessarily just for an emergency, but to have less to worry about in general....even in terms of finances = frugal.

    At least that's the way I see it. It's not that I think my family has any more chance to be fine in a natural disaster. Everyone is vulnerable to the unexpected. An asteroid could hit my house, or more likely, I could be in a car accident. But I feel I have a good ability to be adaptable, when the unexpected comes.
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  6. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by muddylilly View Post
    It's not that I think my family has any more chance to be fine in a natural disaster. Everyone is vulnerable to the unexpected. An asteroid could hit my house, or more likely, I could be in a car accident. But I feel I have a good ability to be adaptable, when the unexpected comes.
    If there was a big disaster, I figure my 'stockpile' may not be much good because it would be gone quickly when friends and neighbors ask for help and I give it to them.

    I originally started stockpiling partly because of frugality and partly because I knew what it felt like to live without. I moved out on my own at age 17 and spent years struggling. It is tough to shop smart when you are broke. So, the first items I started stocking up on, when I could afford it, were laundry detergent and toilet paper - both are items that are not fun to run out of. We have been financially secure throughout our marriage but I still worry knowing how quickly things can change. We now live on one income and it is not always steady and we've had years with a lot of medical bills, so I feel a bit of security knowing we can shop lightly if needed because we have a surplus of food and personal care items.

    Originally my husband hated what he called my 'hording'. He grew up with parents who did the same and he hated it; he is a minimalist and clutter stresses him out. But my products are organized and unseen. (It's not like I have a room full of stocked shelving like you see on extreme coupon shows!)


    eta: Lately, I've been using up/donating rather than replenishing my stock. I'm not sure if I've reached the point where we had too much and it was becoming stressful to see or wasteful because we weren't using it. Or maybe I've just changed. We'll see if I replenish in time.
    Last edited by dbsam; 05-25-2016 at 02:41 PM.
    finished 8th grade (our fifth year homeschooling)
    Dumplett (girl - age 14) and Wombat (boy - age 14)

  7. #26

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    dbsam, you said. "If there was a big disaster, I figure my 'stockpile' may not be much good because it would be gone quickly when friends and neighbors ask for help and I give it to them." Yep, and won't it feel good to be the one offering help, rather than asking for it right away Good for you!
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  8. #27
    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
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    Totally agree with you Muddylilly on all your points.

    Also - maybe the people who are afraid of the zombies call it prepping, and the rest of us just call it self-reliance or something else. My motive for stockpiling is not fear based, maybe that is why it does not seem like prepping to me - it is just something I do. *puts tin foil hat on*
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

  9. #28
    Senior Member Arrived Avalon's Avatar
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    I've never "stockpiled," but I do "stock up" on basics. We could easily last two or three weeks on what's in the house, although it wouldn't be very interesting. Eventually, we'd be down to oatmeal, flour, and rice. I used to put a lot more effort into gardening, storing food, and bulk-buying from local farmers and an organic distributor. Having a cold storage room and a freezer full of food was terrific when we experienced short-term cash crunches. I would cut my grocery bill down to the barest minimum and just use up what we had. It's a lot harder to stock up now that they're teenagers. The food just disappears.

    It's interesting to note that a lot of people are stockpiling in case they're stranded in their homes. With the Fort McMurray wildfire in the province, everyone was evacuated and a lot of the food that people had in their homes will have to be thrown out.

  10. #29

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    Food is not a problem, but drinking water would be. I have lots of dried goods, like beans and pasta, but I am moving away from processed foods, so I am a little concerned. In the winter, I have a freezer full of homemade, frozen meals and if the power went out it would still be fine since the freezer is outside. The summer would be a different story.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  11. #30

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    We're between the Costco and Serious Prepper, we have three months of food for 3, a week of water in house and a purification system. We also keep emergency supplies in the car and our backpacking gear doubles as short term go-bags if we have to evacuate. We've had a few storms knock out power since we moved here, so we keep a camp stove in the house and use our emergency stock if we need to. We make sure if there is a severe weather condition or something we'll be fine, but at the same time we have neither the space nor the inclination to become the kind of preppers who end up on NatGeo.
    Kiddo - 7

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