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  1. #1

    Default Homeschooling and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    I haven't really got anything specific about which to talk, but perhaps we could use this thread for any general issues we might have with our kiddos who have an ASD. This would include Asperger Syndrome as the APA is not the be-all and end-all of diagnostic criteria LOL.

    Aspie
    *************************************************
    GRADUATION, SUMMER 2015!
    NOW ON TO COLLEGE, 2015/2016 SCHOOL YEAR

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  3. #2

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    Sounds good to me.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 12-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  4. #3
    Junior Member Newbie
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    Hello! I'm so happy to have found this page! My 5 year old DD has ASD. She will receive her official diagnosis in a few weeks and we will enroll her in an ABA school for a year. Then I hope to homeschool her. Our neurologist said to keep her in a small school with children similar to her. Beyond the ABA school…I have no idea what to do. How can I find special needs homeschool groups/meet-ups/co-ops in my area? We are in Indianapolis and will be moving to the N/NW suburbs this summer.
    Thanks,
    Jessica

  5. #4

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    Hi Jessica,
    Wondering how West you will be? I am in NE Indiana, but we travel about 45 minutes West to South Bend to the Logan Center. They don't have homeschool groups, but they do have classes and socializing opportunities for kids with ASD. Most are after school or on Saturdays.
    Lisa

  6. #5

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    Well I have something to share. DS, who is 7, has been wanting to learn karate. Now he isn't good in structured class settings, but he really wanted to do this. Well, we are home early, with a child in tears because his anxiety was so bad that he was afraid to participate and mad at himself for it ending this way. It was loud, which we didn't anticipate as much as we should have and some of the kids had participated in the past, so they had an idea of what to expect which increased DS' anxiety even more.

    We are thinking of private lessons since he wants it so badly. It breaks my heart to see him in this state.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 12-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  7. #6

    Default

    That is so frustrating. The Dojo my daughter goes to is very quiet. The sensei is Japanese and so soft-spoken. Maybe there is another Dojo? I am thinking no given your location, but I could be wrong. Privates is always an option, but for my eclectic DD the whole function of the dojo with the sense of order and rules has been really good for her concentration. My DS with ASD refuses to do most of those kind of activities due his low muscle tone and he gets really frustrated, so I totally understand because you just wish you could make it easier for them.

  8. #7

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    There are not a lot of Dojos where we live. And I am concerned about the attitude of some of the teachers (looking to build badass kids instead of training for the order, rules, and respect for the practice).

    The teacher at this one class was really nice and patient with the kids, but the kids were still loud. I think we may try for private lessons, until he feels more comfortable. We are also working on some exercises to help calm his anxiety. Hopefully we can try again soon.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 12-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  9. #8

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    Mariam--I'm sorry. It is heartbreaking to watch the anxiety take away the dream. My daughter (12) did kung fu for years. She was very good, and even competed in tournaments where she took first a couple of times. As the school grew, though, the stress (noise, chaos, new frustrations) became too much and now I can't get her on the deck for anything. My son and I still take classes a few times a week, but we originally started to support her. I have no advice other than to go with the private lessons.
    AtomicGirl--Mom, old enough to know better
    Athena--13, 8th grade, home schooled, 2E, wicked cool
    Monkey King- 8, 3rd grade, home schooled, future owner of the galaxy

  10. #9

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    My own DS tried kung-fu when he was six years old, and did it for a year before he decided the growing noise in the classes - this was a new "school" so there were only a handful of students in each class for a while - was getting too much. Plus, he didn't figure that he'd actually have to touch other people and be touched - which, in sparring, you do have to endure LOL.

    Unfortunately, there will always be sharp shouting in any martial arts. It's about giving attention to only that which is necessary, so there are only staccato commands yelled out to the students. An option is for him to wear those squishy earplugs to drown out the sharpest of noise, if he is able to cope with them in his ears.

    Is there another sport or activity in which he is interested? Something on which he is equally keen, and he can not worry about noise and other sensory issues?
    *************************************************
    GRADUATION, SUMMER 2015!
    NOW ON TO COLLEGE, 2015/2016 SCHOOL YEAR

  11. #10

    Default

    Thanks for all of your kind thoughts.

    Oh he is interested in a ton of sports. He is working on basketball and soccer, but he has had trouble with the team aspect of it.

    We previously had him enrolled in private swimming lessons and I think we will go back to that. I plan on going to private karate, if I can find a teacher/dojo whose philosophy I can work with and who will be willing to work with DS.

    He wants to join Boy Scouts, which I cannot stomach and I think his head would explode when they mention god. We have had discussions about religion, and specifically god and I can see the look on peoples faces when he asks them which god and tells them we have a statue of buddha and vishnu in the house. I am looking at trying to get something together that is an alternative to boy scouts.

    He wants to get out and meet more kids. He has a small group that he plays with, but I know he has other needs to be very social. (I know, he wants to be social, but then he doesn't.)

    He does great with free play. When we go to the park and there is a bunch of kids he does great, most of the time. It is the structure and expectations of a specific outcome that presents problems.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 12-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

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Homeschooling and Autism Spectrum Disorders