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  1. #11

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    Do your children need drill? Not all children do. Some kids just need a little practice and are ready for something different. Even if they do need drill, there are so many free or low cost options out there for drill and some are presented as games which most kids enjoy. Drill, to me, is a form of time filler or busy work necessary in schools, not in a homeschool. In a homeschool, you know you child intimately and you know where they need more work and what they have down pat. Games and occasional drill or just more practice rather than drill, have been much more effective than any blanket type drill used by schools. YMMV.

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  3. #12

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    I agree, games are great! We basically seek to balance school, games, and drills. Of course the kids enjoy the games more than anything, especially when it comes to subjects that are harder to grasp. I have found that drills have been useful as an alternative when we're taking break from school, such as weekends. Do you avoid using drills yourself?

  4. #13

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    I personally cant imagine doing drills that arent game based with the kids.
    My youngest is in the process of memorizing his multiplication facts right now, and that we disguise as a dice game. We keep it a short session (no more than 5 minutes total of “how many problems can you answer in a minute”), and its super interactive between the two of us.
    Im at a loss to think of anything else that benefits from a drill n kill approach.
    All About Reading / Spelling require some memorization, but it is presented as a gentle daily repetition until it is mastered. (ex: “the letter C says /s/ before E, I, and Y”.)

    Is your kid learning while doing an activity / worksheet / drill? If they know it, do they need to be spending their time not learning, but filling out paperwork? If they dont know it, would the time be spent better explaining and teaching the concepts to them?
    “Practice not until you get it right, but cant get it wrong.” - Doesnt mean practice until their eyes bleed with boredom.
    Thats just my philosophy about it.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  5. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by SchoolinFromHome View Post
    I agree, games are great! We basically seek to balance school, games, and drills. Of course the kids enjoy the games more than anything, especially when it comes to subjects that are harder to grasp. I have found that drills have been useful as an alternative when we're taking break from school, such as weekends. Do you avoid using drills yourself?
    Yes, I do avoid drills and always have since my grown children were young and still homeschooled and still do with my youngest who is still homeschooled. My oldest was forced to do a few drills early in his schooling before I realized that it caused anxiety if he didn't know the concept well enough to do the drill and if he did know the concept well enough to do well on the drill, well then what was I drilling him for, he already knows the material. Why make him prove it over and over again? There is something to be said for continued practice but even way back then in the early 2000s he could play drill disguised as a game on the computer which was a lot more fun and productive than worksheet after worksheet.

    If you have worksheet lovers, I completely understand. I had a worksheet/workbook lover too. She actually asked for more workbooks for her birthday one year lol! If drill sheets are just because they love them and crave more, by all means give them what they like. But drill is not required for a good education. In fact, I have another daughter, who loves math and science and is in college now, who has never did a drill sheet in her life. She learned and practiced things through games and teachable moments.

  6. #15

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    All good points! Our kids appear to respond well to variety. The youngest seems to enjoy drills a bit more, but I think that's her competitive streak showing. She wants to keep up with her brother and do exactly what he's doing. I agree that some kids take to it more than others. I do remember games helping me a lot more, while my wife says the workbooks did the trick for her. Personally, I think giving the kids both and seeing what they gravitate t probably makes the most sense. I would be interested in seeing how parents approach this!

  7. #16

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    Exactly! Seeing what they gravitate towards.
    i think especially at the younger ages, if its something theyre not enjoying, look for an alternative. Drill n Kill isnt the only way to learn! Even math facts!
    If theyre asking to do something, go for it! If theyre dreading it, see how you can make it more palatable for them.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

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