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Thread: Hello there

  1. #1

    Default Hello there

    I didn't think I'd be considering homeschool but here I am I am currently 8 months pregnant with baby number 5 (he's coming on 2/25). My oldest is in the 6th grade and is increasingly unhappy at school. Not only is he unhappy but my brillant(totally unbiased opinion) child is in no way learning to his potential. He is on the autism spectrum and has a hard time socially and that is greatly impacting his learning. He has been asking me about being able to homeschool for a couple months now and I'm trying to figure the process out but I'm a bit overwhelmed.

    My background: As I said 5 kiddos. Boy age 11, boy age 9, girl age 7, boy age 4, and boy to be born next month (yep that's a lot of boys ). I also am newly divorced, and happy about it. I have an undergraduate degree in accounting, but after passing the CPA exam and working for a bit I had one child diagnosed with autism and a second diagnosed with ADHD. The process of finding them a place in school became overwhelming and upsetting as I realized how little the school system understood about students that are "high funtioning" academically and special needs. I got lofty ideas about fixing this on a grander scale and went back to school for a master's degree in educational research. The focus of my course studies and thesis work was mostly "speical needs students that function intellectually at or above grade level." But even having this in my arsenal has not really helped me to get my son to a place where he is comfortable in school. He went from winning the class Einstein award to failing two core classes.

    We are in Georgia (about 30 minutes south of Atlanta) so most of the groups around us use a Christian curriculum. I'm realizing from the bit of reading I've done here that it's more than likely not going to be a one stop shop for curriculum and I'm worried about making the right choices. It's going to be an adjustment for us but I feel like homeschool might be a better choice for my son. Also,I'm a bit worried about social development. Not necessarily because of homeschooling but because I also suffer from social anxiety (I received a late in life autism diagnosis myself, was diagnosed with social anxiety at age 9).

    Sorry for the long winded intro but I'm looking forward to getting to know you all and gleaning a wealth of useful information.

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  3. #2

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    Hugs, and welcome!

    Be easy on yourself, and know that homeschooling can work for you.... on your terms. Yes, you will probably need to piece subjects together - so that they match your goals, and your son’s interests! We can help when youre looking.

    As far as social skills, Ive yet to meet a homeschool kid that didnt have better manners than my across the street, public schooled neighbors. Homeschooling lets you choose the social encounters, sort of an introvert’s dream. You can feel a lot less awkward when youre in a social situation because its where you want to be, doing what you want to do. You can connect with friends (online, for example), when you feel like it. Social skills is a reason to homeschool, not a reason to avoid it!

    It does sound like youre going to have your hands full in the coming months - a perfect time to let your son relax and “deschool” a bit - a chance to regain his self esteem and confidence, recover from the traumas he is suffering at the school.

    Let us know how we can help, we all started homeschooling at some point and can remember it.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  4. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie5 View Post
    I'm realizing from the bit of reading I've done here that it's more than likely not going to be a one stop shop for curriculum and I'm worried about making the right choices.

    Also,I'm a bit worried about social development. Not necessarily because of homeschooling but because I also suffer from social anxiety (I received a late in life autism diagnosis myself, was diagnosed with social anxiety at age 9).

    Sorry for the long winded intro but I'm looking forward to getting to know you all and gleaning a wealth of useful information.
    Hi and welcome.

    I understand the anxiety about choosing the *right* things. I guess the way I try look at is that if I am choosing each piece separately and something does not work out, it is easier to change just that subject than if it was an all-in-one curriculum. Also, usually cheaper. If you buy an all-in-one and it does not work out, then that is usually a lot of $$ that is not utilized.

    Do some deschooling like AM suggested. What does your child enjoy to do in their free time. Let them explore and get their curiosity back. Then pick one subject that you want to get sorted and start working on figuring out a curriculum to try. Print off any free resources you can find and try those until you hit one that looks like a good enough fit to actually buy.

    As someone who is introverted, and has a child who has a lot of social anxiety, I have found social development to be better outside of school than in. Even for my super social extroverted one, she prefers home school socializing to public school.

    My oldest went to school for 3 years and I can say it is a relief both stress/anxiety and time wise to home school and not have to fight to try get accommodations when your kid does not fit. Having a new baby will be busy either way, and if it was me, I would prefer to have the kids home schooling rather than trying to bring a new baby along school pick ups and drops offs, teacher meetings, trying to do school homework and make dinner and keep kids happy in that period of time after school when they are all angsty and tired.
    New Zealand-based freelance science copyeditor. Homeschooling DD 11 (year 7) and DD 6 (year 2).

  5. #4

    Default

    Thank you for your support and perspectives. It made me feel a lot of relief to read. I was beginning to think I was crazy for even considering starting now but deschooling is not something I had heard of or considered and it makes a lot of sense. The benefits of piecemeal curriculum and the social benefits are also good things to take into consideration espeically when I'm leaning more towards finding things to worry about (kind of a normal state for me ). Not dealing with the daily stuff like pickup and drop off along with accommodations, IEP meetings, calls from the couselor, and weekly emails about what he's not doing will definitely be a relief and honestly after taking all that into account my time commitment isn't gonig to change as much as I thought.

    My son loves drawing and he loves learning random new things. He is constantly telling me things he found out and is interested in and I think it will definitely be beneficial to be able to use these random interests to help direct his learning. I'm looking forward to the connection it can help foster.

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