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  1. #1
    Junior Member Newbie darbyfred's Avatar
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    Default Hello from Albany, Oregon

    We are considering homeschooling our DD 12yrs 7th grade, because she is extremely unhappy and cries about having to go. My DD is gay and kids make homophobic comments directed at her, along with racist comments directed at other kids. She doesn't feel like the teachers care when it comes to learning and the comments about her and other kids. All of this has created a lot of anxiety issues and is now seeing a therapist (at her request).

    I joined in the hopes of getting some information and guidance about homeschooling, because I am completely at a loss at where to begin. She excels in ELA, but struggles in math due to a horrible math teacher last year. I know she is going to have to play catch up and we might have to hire a tutor.

    Thanks

  2. T4L In Forum Oct19
  3. #2

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    Welcome! Im so sorry to hear about your daughter’s misery, and Im glad youre willing to do something about it.

    We can answer questions for you all day. Just ask.

    To start, you probably do NOT want to look at all-subjects included curriculum, or the online schools (not to say an online class will be bad.... its the whole package deal that makes it go downhill). That being said, if she loves writing and language arts, you may want to look at BuildYourLibrary.com and Bravewriter. The first will combine your language arts and social studies (read literature about the time period youre studying). Bravewriter (BW) has study guides and you can pick the literature youre reading independent of anything else. (And its a very gentle program, no worksheets and busywork.) (BYL has a lot of stuff, I think they assume you will edit it down to what you want to do.)
    A book you might find helpful is this, written by someone who has presented consistently sound advice here:
    Her book is here: https://www.amazon.com/Tweens-Tough-.../dp/1721555056

    My opinion of middle school math (my oldest is in 8th grade) is that once arithmatic is finished, its basically years of review in pre-Algebra land. So a year of a crappy teacher might not have stunted her math prospects as much as you fear. Take some placement tests. See which math causes the best reaction.

    We can help more when you ask specifics!

    Good luck, and know that this year may be more of her healing than zipping ahead academically. It will be alright, she wont be condemned to poverty if she doesnt do math 5x a week.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Enlightened
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    Default

    Welcome to the forum!

    I'm glad you are considering other options for her education that don't involve bullying and misery. I agree with alexsmom in that the first year will probably have more to do with healing and just getting some air. My advice is to have a loose structure, a routine where you are accomplishing the basics--math, reading and writing--or filling in gaps, aiming at being up to speed on grade level. After doing that, there is plenty of time in the day to pursue other interests, like cooking, gardening, music, science, outdoors or art.

    We have one day in the middle of our week that we call our "free day." On this day, we either take a field trip, do something outdoors like hike or go to the beach, etc. I think a lot of content learning can be done by going to museums, observing nature outdoors, going to events, fashioning wacky experiments, and just having a mindset geared towards fun.
    Homeschooling an only, DS10

    How should we like it were stars to burn
    With a passion for us we could not return?
    If equal affection cannot be,
    Let the more loving one be me.

    W. H. Auden

  5. #4

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    Welcome to the forum.
    My daughter was removed, almost a decade ago, due to bullying and social problems. The local district's teachers didn't care about the students either; they were only worried about getting funding dollars.
    We're in the process right now of trying out some new meds so we're not getting a lot of school done. My daughter (Aspie) suffers from depression, anxiety, OCD, etc.
    Definitely use your first year to unwind from the BS of public school and ask a lot of questions. Make sure you know your state's homeschooling laws inside and out.
    Last edited by outskirtsofbs; 10-11-2019 at 07:51 PM.
    --Kelly--Atheist/Accidental/Alternative Homeschool Mom to one great KID in southern Iowa since 3/1/10---Now making our way through the high school years.

  6. #5
    Junior Member Newbie darbyfred's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks everyone.

    I will admit that my husband and I are completely scared about this undertaking. But we are really hoping that she will flourish.

  7. #6

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    Hugs to you! You will do alright!
    Being terrified that you will mess up the future of your daughter seems a common fear with public school refugees.

    We can metaphorically hold your hand, walk you through every step of the way, talk you off the bridges..... Just ask. We will do our best to give you answers.

    If you need help picking a math, science, history, language arts, or other kind of curriculum, we can help with that too. Tell us a little about her interests, what her attention span for “schoolwork” is like (has she been a school project procrastinator, does she compliantly and reliably get her work done in a reasonable manner, is she independent and self-disciplined to the point you dont know where she gets it from, etc), and how worried YOU are about the subject matter.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  8. #7
    Junior Member Newbie darbyfred's Avatar
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    She never has homework because her school doesn't assign homework and if her teachers assign extra work, she does it all at school.

    She loves ELA class and the other subjects. She doesn't like math because she has convinced herself she is not good at it. I will admit she is a bit lazy, but if something with school needs to be done she does it. I do believe that she needs something more structured though. She needs her weeks laid out. She loves to read. Right now she is reading IT, by Stephen King. She paints. She is pretty creative. She used to be on a swim team, but around November of last body image issues and anxiety took over and she gave it up, even though a part of her didn't want to. She has agreed that if we are going to homeschool her she has to go back to swim and she has agreed. She is an amazing swimmer and she knows she's really good at it.

    I checked out the Build You library and I love how its laid out. Each week it gives you a schedule of what to work on. I do have a question about Bravewriter, is it worth the money? If someone can recommend a good math program that would be great.
    And do schedule the curriculum for example 3 different subject each day or do set it up more like a regular school day?

  9. #8

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    Welcome!

    What parts of Bravewriter are you looking at? We just use little bits of it. I have never bought or read The Writers Jungle because its so expensive and because I do not have the time to read it properly. But we do use the odd Arrow or Boomerang (guides for specific books with copywork/dictation and how to study the grammar and such like), which I usually buy when they are on sale. They also have some free samples of them. We have also purchased the writing project guides, and have done Jot it Down and Partnership writing so far. We have liked all the bits we have used.

    Math I think is difficult at this level from what I have read. We have just finished with Beast Academy, which went up to grade 5, and I still have not decided what to do next. My DD also had convinced herself she was bad at math at school (we pulled her out when she was 8) but now loves it.

    With a routine or schedule, just play around and find what works for you. Everyone likes something different. My DD loves structure and routine and likes a checklist and do her days mostly the same everyday. She usually alternates between more academic stuff and then creative stuff, like math then music, and then a break before she moves onto the next section. But it took us about a year of trying out different routines to find what she liked doing.
    New Zealand-based. DD 11 (year 6 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 6 (year 1 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

    That's a kea (NZ parrot) in my avatar. You can learn about them on Beak & Brain - Genius Birds from Down Under on Netflix.

  10. #9

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    I suggest you try the Homeschool Math Selector quiz. There is a secular version and a religious version so you can one or both just to see what your options are. Since your daughter is plenty old enough to have a say in what curriculum she uses, I would sit down together with her and take the quiz together. You should have several choices that match your answers and some that you can cross off your list as they probably won't work well for your daughter. Then you can take your matches and take a closer look at them and try the placement tests. They are usually available for free from the publisher's website for each curriculum.

  11. #10
    Junior Member Newbie darbyfred's Avatar
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    Default

    Thank you. We will try Homeschool Math Selector quiz. As an atheist I really find it disturbing that there is a Christian math. Math is math, I thought. Researching all this homeschooling curriculum I am amazed that there is so much religion based material.

    Does anyone have any good recommendations for science programs?

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