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  1. #1

    Default Considering Homeschooling

    Hello! I am writing from SW Michigan and am brand new to the idea of homeschooling. My super-smart son has anxiety and issues with public school and has been asking me for years to homeschool him. After much consideration, my husband and I feel itís the best way to go starting next school year... but I have no idea where to begin, what kind of curriculum do I use for an 8th grader who will probably cruise through any material I will teach him? Any advice would he appreciated! Thank you!!

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  3. #2

    Default

    Welcome! Getting good matches with curriculum is always a challenge for new homeschoolers!
    Pick subjects that are interesting to him (and hopefully you, too). What does he want to study for science, for social studies? Where is he at for math? You might want to integrate his literature with the social studies or the science (for example, if you want to study US History, you would get appropriate American Literature). Some programs like buildyourlibrary.com will integrate Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies. If that sort of integration appeals to you, look around not at just the 8th grade (History of Science), but the 7th grade (World Geography), and the other years to see if its of interest to him. There are years worth of wiggle room in these types of programs, and you can add to or cut out as suits your kid. Go by the topic, not the year number!
    The same idea holds for science (if you dont do BYL style integrated), especially a first year homeschooling. Let it be a topic he really likes, and find an appropriate level for his skill in it. (Ive forbidden astronomy, physics, and chemistry until mine has more algebra under his belt.

    Dont spend a lot of money on anything, and dont buy any ďall in one grade level packagesĒ. Even in the previously mentioned BYL, you can and should get the books from libraries. Otherwise you will spend a small fortune on books that although he will enjoy, after the two weeks spent reading them is over, he may never pick them up again. (Thats how it is in my house.... the boys love the stories they read, but never go back to re-read them. We buy only the books that we use as reference over several years.)
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  4. #3

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    Welcome. I started homeschooling my daughter for similar reasons. She is gifted with anxiety + some other issues (much slower processing speed and maybe ODD). It has been fantastic for her and she is very happy and currently says she never wants to return to school. It has not been a cure for her anxiety, we still get that pop up at other things, but it has allowed her to not be in that anxious/stressed state all day at school, which has been very beneficial for her overall outlook. It is stretch for myself to cope with homeschooling as I also work part time and am an introvert and like my alone and quiet time. But we find ways to make it work.

    Alexsmom is way more experienced than me and has given lots of great advice about curricula.

    My only thing to add would be to not worry about him breezing through a 'year level of curricula'. Rather than teaching the same stuff but quicker, use it as an opportunity to do more. Explore all the random interests and side topics that pop up, because you can fit that in and do all your other requirements as well.

    For my daughter, I started by sorting out math for her, and then adding in language arts, social studies and science, and foreign language, art, music, and other extras (like community service), in that order, based on what was important to us to figure out first.

    We use a curriculum for math, pick out books and do various activities for language arts, and do interest based for social studies and science. Sometimes it is integrated and sometimes it is not. This year we have started with Ancient Egypt, Space, and Physics.
    New Zealand-based. DD 11 (year 6 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 6 (year 1 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

    That's a kea (NZ parrot) in my avatar. You can learn about them on Beak & Brain - Genius Birds from Down Under on Netflix.

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