Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    Default New Midwest Mom Trying to Plan Ahead

    Hello all,

    My daughter is about to turn 3, and her education has been on my mind since the beginning. We do have access to a language immersion school, but the personal reports and experiences make it seem sub-par. The other schools in nearby districts score particularly badly (I'm really trying not to let my personal experience with public school create an all-encompassing viewpoint of public school in general). Homeschooling is our best option, honestly. I'm a stay home parent, anyway, so that wouldn't be an issue. Research showed me that secular curricula are not as common, and searching through my options brought me to your wonderfully helpful website.

    My child loves to learn, and I don't want to take that joy away. Currently we use books, crafts, and things like that to introduce her to different aspects of her world. We are a two-mom family, and the confusion about differences between her family and other's families happened sooner than I anticipated. Children are so amazingly receptive.

    Researching the curriculum we would like to use in 2 or 3 years has been more intense than we had expected (partially because my way to research is diving in deep and surrounding myself with information). We seem very interested in starting with Build Your Library.

    Thank you for reading, I am excited to have found this community

  2. T4L In Forum Aug19
  3. #2

    Default

    Welcome! Like you, I knew I wanted to homeschool. and by my oldest at age 3, wanted to explore my plan and have everything up and running by the time we hit Kindergarten.

    Crafts and exploring her world seem like the perfect things to be doing for the next few years. Crafting, scissoring, coloring, and anything using her hands will improve her fine motor skills, which will make writing so much easier for her. An active and steady library habit is a good idea. Counting, sorting, and memory games are helpful pre-math skills.
    You seem to be on the right track now, just dont go overboard in your enthusiasm and start playing school with her too early.

    We just finished the BYL Kindergarten, and enjoyed it. We adapted it to our needs, and tbh, went mostly off the material that older was doing (BYL 7, world geography), but the supplemental book list was good, and expanded the repetoire of picture books that my younger enjoyed. Wait until your daughter starts to show some interest in the idea of other countries, it is pretty pointless before then.

    Another secular source to check would be BraveWriter, for a gentle philosophical approach. Her “Jot it Down” is for the early elementary age kids, I found it immensely helpful. If you like BYL, you would probably like BraveWriter, too.

    Enjoy this time with your little girl! We are always here to talk you off the ledge of curriculum buying... its one many of us have been on, if not over.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  4. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alexsmom View Post
    Welcome! Like you, I knew I wanted to homeschool. and by my oldest at age 3, wanted to explore my plan and have everything up and running by the time we hit Kindergarten.

    Crafts and exploring her world seem like the perfect things to be doing for the next few years. Crafting, scissoring, coloring, and anything using her hands will improve her fine motor skills, which will make writing so much easier for her. An active and steady library habit is a good idea. Counting, sorting, and memory games are helpful pre-math skills.
    You seem to be on the right track now, just dont go overboard in your enthusiasm and start playing school with her too early.

    We just finished the BYL Kindergarten, and enjoyed it. We adapted it to our needs, and tbh, went mostly off the material that older was doing (BYL 7, world geography), but the supplemental book list was good, and expanded the repetoire of picture books that my younger enjoyed. Wait until your daughter starts to show some interest in the idea of other countries, it is pretty pointless before then.

    Another secular source to check would be BraveWriter, for a gentle philosophical approach. Her “Jot it Down” is for the early elementary age kids, I found it immensely helpful. If you like BYL, you would probably like BraveWriter, too.

    Enjoy this time with your little girl! We are always here to talk you off the ledge of curriculum buying... its one many of us have been on, if not over.

    Thank you for the response!

    I'm glad that I'm not the only parent trying to plan ahead like this. Some people probably think I'm a little nuts, but that's okay, haha.

    Funnily enough, others gave her the idea of "school", and so she began asking me about it. To appease her fear of missing out, we started calling the same things she had already been doing "school" every so often, increased our library visits, and that made everyone happy. We aren't going to really start school until she is 5 or 6, when she is ready. I'll need to talk to family and friends so they don't create that issue again, though. They always tell me that she's a "genius", she's "advanced", and whatnot. I know they mean it as a compliment, but it worries me. I personally tested as "gifted" very early on, and from then on I had immense pressure on me and anything under perfection was seen as a failure on my part. Teachers wanted me to skip grades, I just wanted the chance to be a child, it was a mess. That is certainly not a situation I'd want to recreate for my own daughter. At her age, learning is meant to be fun, and she's learning a ton through play (a lot of her play is open-ended and unstructured). I didn't mean for this to be so long a rant-y, my apologies.

    I'm going to check out Bravewriter now, I appreciate the suggestion!

  5. #4

    Default

    Some people may think youre a little over-keen, but I can relate to wanting things prepared in advance. (Youre reading a post from a mom who not only has the week’s menu planned, but after grocery trip this morning, all food has been prepped for the week.... grapes off stem, strawberries quartered, carrots and cheese shredded, tomorrow’s dinner marinating, etc.)
    Truly though, you wont know how something is going to work out until you try it. So there is no use picking a phonics or math curriculum until youre ready for it, for example. Even then, there will be trial and error, so best to start with the inexpensive programs first!

    Instead of sheltering your daughter from the “school” word, you might want to desensitize (both of you!) to it. Tell everyone you do preschool at home, tell her that your routine (if you have one) is “school”, tell her youre “doing school” when you are crafting, or playing memory games, or reading library books together.
    Just for social expediency, you know? Her idea of school, and the nosy busy-body you are interacting with will have different ideas of what school entails, but it will get you on to the next topic of conversation without placing you on the defensive, trying to explain your situation and perspective on it. Plus, you do want her to be thinking of “school” as all those fun things. Just like you dont want to (or need to) justify a two mom household, homeschooling is the same. “Pass the bean dip” is a common homeschooling meme.
    https://www.weirdunsocializedhomesch...pass-bean-dip/

    If you have questions or struggles, ask!
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  6. #5

    Default

    We are a two mom family, as well! We have a 7 and 3 year old and live in the Midwest. Secular materials are becoming easier to find, thankfully.

    I also started researching, reading, planning, etc very early. We started our oldest with Before Five in a Row and omitted the religious parts. It's a book based curriculum with activities based on the books.

    We then did Build Your Library for K and 1st grade and enjoyed it.

    We are going to try a new secular lit curriculum this coming year (Torchlight) to compare the two. Torchlight will also be coming out with a preschool level in early 2019.

    With our 3.5 year old, she sees her sister doing school, so SHE wants to do school. We found Blossom and Root and LOVE it. It is play based, easy going, relaxed and fun. Normally, we wouldn't start now, but because her sister does school, she wants to. I want to have something to offer her.

    We are also fans of All About Reading, All About Spelling, Pandia Press (REAL Science Odyssey and History Odyssey), Aesop's workbooks from Royal Fireworks Press, Elemental Science (for younger learners before Pandia: Learning Through Science, Exploring Science and Intro to Science), and Explode the Code workbooks (A,B,C starts the series.)

    Good luck in your journey!
    Last edited by NotYourName; 07-24-2018 at 10:22 PM.
    CJ (Mom)
    Bug: 8 years old
    Doodle: 4 years old
    Instagram
    Pinterest

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
New Midwest Mom Trying to Plan Ahead