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  1. #1
    Junior Member Newbie smashattackash's Avatar
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    Smile Hello from Atlanta

    Hi everyone, I'm Ash. I'm new to the homeschool scene and very much look forward to learning from and sharing with you. I've been married 10 years in May, and we have a 4 year old boy and 1.5 year old girl. My son is an amazing yet challenging child. He has sensory processing disorder and we suspect ADHD. He's ahead of the curve academically but lagging socio-emotionally. He keeps me on my toes! My daughter is chill and just likes to follow her brother around. My family and I live in Atlanta and we're members of Atlanta Homeschool Co-op. It's a fantastic group of people and I'm really thankful that my son can be around other kids, though he has struggles in group settings. I wanted to homeschool before he was walking, and I'm glad we made the choice to dive in. I worked in schools prior to homeschooling, and it breaks my heart to think of my son in a classroom. Not to say they are on in the same, but you get my point. I'm still trying to learn the best way to teach my son, and I'm a planner by nature. The 2 things are just not meshing well. I'm thinking of trying the loop schedule idea. We mainly play all day, but since he is picking things up quickly, I want to make sure he's also gently challenged. I have to make things fun or they just won't happen at this stage. Reading to him can be difficult. We do books at bedtime every night, but to get him to sit and listen to a book is laughable. I often try to read during breakfast and lunch, but it doesn't always pan out. I give him something to do with his hands while I read at other times, but he has a huge imagination and off blurts out his thoughts with his activity, so it's obvious he isn't listening much. I work on this daily. I need this to be a read alooud family.
    ~Ash

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  3. #2

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    Welcome!
    Being planned and organized is great! Just be flexible about the implementation... and know that you can be!

    My older son was great about being read aloud to... my younger one - not so much. Unless the younger is cuddled against me, and its a picture book, he has absolutely no interest. All kids are different, and although the idyllic stereotype of kids lovingly gazing at their parents as the chapters of Moby Dick are read to them is nice, it isnt for everyone. As you said it, *You* need it to be a read aloud family - that isnt taking his disposition into account. If he isnt engaging with the storytime, try something else. Thats one of the joys of homeschooling - you do what works for your kids.
    (My youngest has language processing issues - I suspect he views chapter books as a form of verbal diarrhea.)

    Your biggest challenge for homeschooling may be in staying flexible and responding to your kids needs. It is a challenge I know I still struggle with.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  4. #3

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    Try audio-books, especially in the car, or as a background while the kids are playing. I know I start feeling underappreciated (and angry) if I am reading and the kids are not paying attention, but if it is an audio-book, I care less (I am not 'wasting' my time and effort) and the kids tend to sense the diminished pressure, and listen better.

    Also, I agree with Alexsmom that 'your' vision of homeschooling might not be exactly what would work best for your kids. Learning to adjust to your kids' personalities and quirks will save you a lot of frustration.

    And please do not forget that your kids are very, very little - academics can wait, but play, fun, imaginative games, and creativity should not.
    mom to 3 girls: DD10, DD9, DD6

  5. #4

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    My youngest is 4.5 and started asking to be taught to read at least a year ago. So we have done a few "academic" things even though she is little. We use Reading Eggs and Math Seeds, with some printed out letter tracing/writing pages, and a book called Preschool Math at Home by Kate Snow. Plus some phonics readers from the library. We only do those things when she asks, it is all sitting in one area, and if she wants to grab something out, we do it. But then we go weeks where none of it gets touched. So just be flexible and go with what he wants. He sounds like he likes moving around. Would he like doing things like introductory science experiments (sink and float, baking soda + vinegar etc.), hammering nails in wood (we count nails as we do this), drawing shapes in chalk on the pavement?

  6. #5
    Junior Member Newbie smashattackash's Avatar
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    Thank you everyone for your advice and perspective. You are soooo very right that I need to adjust my views of homeschooling to meet their needs. I've been working on that, every day. I do not push academics and run with it when he seems receptive. Even though he's picking things up, I don't want to push because I want him to love to learn. I have tried audio books, and he often talks over them, as well, even in the car. He talks A LOT. He is a very hands-on child and likes to move, so I do my best to incorporate these methods, even if they are so different from how my brain works. He has done many of the things that NZ_Mama mentioned. We do science and STEM all the time, we all enjoy them. We play a lot of board games and he's learned basic addition/subtraction through that. Reading Eggs has helped with reading, though he started reading simple words a year ago. He LOVES to play but would sit on technology all day if I let him. I think that is the ADHD working though, technology provides him with constant feedback that his brain needs. We get outside now that the weather is better in GA. I'm not a fan of the sun and heat but I will bear with it. I think nature exploration is so important. Maybe I'll try reading a book outside!

    Keep the advice rolling in.
    ~Ash

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