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  1. #1

    Default HOmeschooler in LA and all alone :/

    hello all! i am just starting out with an 11, 10, 7 and 2 year old. my main focus is the 11 and 10 year old and keeping them interested in learning. i dont have anyone around me to ask for help so im looking for a supportive online community, that doesnt mind all my frequent questions the one thing i cant seem to find is schedules. i can find some but its bible study and only courses for one child. with my kids in public school i have at least three schedules so i know homeschooling schedules cant be that easy. i need real schedules, with back up plans and "what if" plans. i clean houses and my husband works shift work so schedules are super important for everyone to know where everyone else is and when we get time together. any help is welcome, thank you all for having me and i hope yall still want me in a few weeks

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  3. #2
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    The great thing (although the sometimes nerve-wracking thing) about homeschooling is that you get to completely design your OWN schedules. The toughest part is that you'll probably change them up about once a month (if not more often!) in the beginning. If you are coming to homeschooling and craving a ton of structure, then feel free to create a more rigid schedule that incorporates each of the subjects you want to cover and how long you want to spend on them. If you come to it with a more relaxed attitude, then your schedule could be as simple as "Mornings: hands-on projects Afternoons: independent work."

    The biggest thing to keep in mind when getting started homeschooling is that the focused time you need for each core subject is WAY less than what a classroom requires. When you're working 1:1 you remove all the time-sucking elements of mass education. That means that if an ordinary classroom spends about 50 minutes on math per day, you will likely only need 15-20, etc.

    As an example, let's say you were using Time4Learning's online curriculum. They offer the core subjects of language arts, math, science, and social studies in the elementary and middle school levels. So, if each child were doing their online subjects, they might spent 15-30 minutes on each one daily. That's about 2 hours or less of dedicated lesson focus. But there's SO much you might be supplementing with along the way: reading aloud, handwriting or keyboarding practice, foreign language learning, outside sports and arts, etc. etc. It all adds up to a nice rounded education but you still are likely to be done with homeschooling in half the time a normal school day might take.

    And it's SO much more FUN!!!!


  4. #3

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    Welcome!
    One of the best things about homeschooling is that it will fit into your schedule... so finding one made by someone else isnt likely to be applicable to your situation.
    Are you looking for about how much time to spend on subjects with each kid? With my 11 yr old, we spend about a half hour per lesson... sometimes a little more if he writes something up. Your kids attention spans may vary.
    Are you looking for how other people have their days arranged, what subjects on what days? Again, that varies by each family. Some people like hitting every subject every day, some hit a couple subjects daily (like math), and others a couple times a week (like science). Some do half a year of science, then half a year of social studies.... it all depends on all the aspects that make us unique.
    You may find having routines are more important than having an inflexible schedule that doesnt adjust to weekly changes.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by topsy View Post
    the great thing (although the sometimes nerve-wracking thing) about homeschooling is that you get to completely design your own schedules. The toughest part is that you'll probably change them up about once a month (if not more often!) in the beginning. If you are coming to homeschooling and craving a ton of structure, then feel free to create a more rigid schedule that incorporates each of the subjects you want to cover and how long you want to spend on them. If you come to it with a more relaxed attitude, then your schedule could be as simple as "mornings: Hands-on projects afternoons: Independent work."
    i will definitely need a more rigid schedule just to keep myself on track i would just like to see more schedule boards to get ideas. I know i will have to maneuver things around, im just curious what others are doing
    the biggest thing to keep in mind when getting started homeschooling is that the focused time you need for each core subject is way less than what a classroom requires. When you're working 1:1 you remove all the time-sucking elements of mass education. That means that if an ordinary classroom spends about 50 minutes on math per day, you will likely only need 15-20, etc.

    As an example, let's say you were using time4learning's online curriculum. They offer the core subjects of language arts, math, science, and social studies in the elementary and middle school levels. So, if each child were doing their online subjects, they might spent 15-30 minutes on each one daily. That's about 2 hours or less of dedicated lesson focus. But there's so much you might be supplementing with along the way: Reading aloud, handwriting or keyboarding practice, foreign language learning, outside sports and arts, etc. Etc. It all adds up to a nice rounded education but you still are likely to be done with homeschooling in half the time a normal school day might take.

    And it's so much more fun!!!!
    agreed!

  6. #5

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    it is quite overwhelming so i would love to see more to get ideas. we have a dry erase board for chores and such, we have a pin board for family activities, bdays, and daddy's schedule. i plan to have each childs schedule in their binder. my work schedule is in my phone. so its kind of all over the place. i was wondering if anyone had a more simplistic idea i had not thought of.

  7. #6

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    I'm in Louisiana too. Welcome to the forum! Nobody starts homeschooling(or anything else for that matter) with everything figured out. Take baby steps with figuring out your own system. There are lots of ways to do things. You'll find out of the box thinkers here for sure! Good luck!
    Mom to 3, only homeschooling DD13.

    "The best teachers are those who show you where to look, but don't tell you what to see." Alexandra K. Trenfor

  8. #7
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    A few previous posts that might give even more food for thought:



    Another great resource is our "Day in the Life of a Secular Homeschooler" series. You can start browsing those at this link (there are multiple pages of them): https://www.secularhomeschool.com/lis...y/53-day-life/


  9. #8

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    What about checklists instead of schedules for the kids? I make weekly checklists on the weekends, of all the things I want to accomplish in school that week. THe kids check it off as they do them. I know some homeschoolers schedule out HUGE chunks at a time, but I Like just doing a week at a time. It gives me the flexibility to go off on trails, cross out things I find useless, and not spend a lot of time on topics they aren't interested in. I plan 4 school days per week- with one day being for errands, library, ect. Next year we are joining a coop, so that's going to be my 5th day on those weeks. Still 4 academic days. If I know I have 4 days,a nd I want to get a chapter in science done, I look at what needs to be done, and sort of divide it out into doable amounts per day. SOme days I will have more reading in one subject, so another subject is dropped.

    If you have a lot of outside activities, maybe get a family calendar white board and fill it out each month- each kid in a different color, but I would not add school stuff to that list unless it's a big activity. I keep a calendar on my desk, and fill it out with appointments, activities, ect., so that I know if we have something one day I can re-arrange school that week.
    Mom to 5 great kids~

  10. #9

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    This sums up my views on schedules:
    The Conflict Between Home and Schedule « A Brave Writer

    I make a list of what needs to be done for the day for each kid and they check it off and if it doesn't get checked off it goes to the next day. This gives us flexibility, but some structure too.
    Beth
    DS16 with ASD, DD12 and DS10

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by HawaiiGeek View Post
    Thank you Hawai'iGeek! I really, REALLY needed this today. Sick kids for 2 weeks (off an on) right when I was trying to make sure some stuff got done by the end of June was making me feel anxious. What a great reminder of why we continue to homeschool
    Kids are so much more than a test score.
    Qualities not measured by a test: creativity, persistence, curiosity, humor, self-discipline, empathy, humility and so many more!

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HOmeschooler in LA and all alone :/