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  1. #1

    Default Researching Homeschooling a High School Student in Ohio

    Hello all!

    Wanted to introduce myself. I currently have a 9th grade son in a public magnet high school. He has been struggling in school since we moved to Ohio two years ago. Prior to that he went to a very small charter school that had a max of 6 students per class and that had "looping" whereas he had the same teachers for 3 years and he thrived in that environment. My son has ADHD but and very academically strong in all subjects.

    Since starting 7th grade and having to deal with so many teachers and classes he has struggled to maintain decent grades. Mostly due to "forgetting" to turn in work both class work and homework as he mostly struggles with executive functioning and forgetfulness. I am struggling with a decision to remove him from the public school, which I honestly love the concept of but don't feel it is a good fit for my kid. Unfortunately, my kid loves his school, mostly because it is a STEM school filled with cool, nerdy kids like himself and so he has a good group of friends that he enjoys interacting with. They also do a lot of science and engineering projects and my son excels at things like that and enjoys working on the projects (though he doesn't turn in the worksheets that go along with the projects lol).

    Starting this school year he has done very poorly in school and even got some Fs (for not turning in homework primarily) and I am worried for him academically. I told him last year (8th grade) that if he didn't do better in 9th grade that I would strongly consider pulling him from school. We are at that point right now. I honestly do feel he will do better in a home school environment but I am worried about him not wanting to do it and being disagreeable along with the time commitment for myself in planning (I work 40-60 hours per week and I love my husband but know I cannot depend on him to do any planning. He is on board though for potentially homeschooling and would monitor our son at home and ensure he is doing lessons. Husband, I believe is undiagnosed ADHD as he and our son are pretty similar and my husband graduated high school with less than a 1.5 gpa even though he also is very intelligent and went on to do well in college - he had to start on probation since he had such a poor gpa but high SAT scores). So I'm interested primarily in any online programs that could assist that have a quality high school curriculum with everything planned out that my husband could follow. I also am open to virtual academies/schools that may be public charters but I want one that my kid could potentially "test out" of having to do certain lessons and not be forced to watch boring videos about stuff he already knows or take 6-8 hours per day to do a day's lessons. I think my kid is growing more interested in homeschooling since I talked it up by telling him he wouldn't have to be "in school" all day and he could pursue some other of his interests which are sports (track and wrestling - I could have him join some clubs in the area outside of the public/private schools), taking some music and art lessons and working with his dad in his business after he is done (dad pays him, so he is always open to this).

    So hi again and I'm glad to be around

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  3. #2

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    Can he do some classes in his current school and some classes at home? It really depends on your state, or even your school district. If not, can he still participate in extracurricular groups? That way he can keep participating in some of the cool STEM projects and keep easy ties to his classmates, but allow him more freedom in some of the less interesting (to him), but important classes. Perhaps only having one or two classes to keep track of would help.

    We are using Khan Academy for math. It's free and allows you to monitor his progress and how often he is on it. My son is also doing AP Chemistry on it. (Fair warning, we're using it as 8th grade chemistry, so I'm not sure it is very rigorous. The math is great.)

  4. #3

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    Unfortunately since he goes to a magnet high school, he cannot do any classes at home. He has to do all the classes at his school. We do use Khan Academy for additional math practice on weekends, so he is familiar with it and his school uses a blend of classical math class and a program called ALECS for math, which is similar to Khan Academy, but he has to be at the school to do the traditional class work.

    Our district is not very accommodating. He mostly just needs a teacher to tell him to turn in his work directly and to follow up with him. But they won't do that and are fighting me in regards to having this put on an IEP since it is not a traditional accommodation. I also understand the objection due to them having hundreds of students to keep track of and my kid and his issues not being something they feel they should have to spend so much time on. So I get it from their perspective, but not from my own. At his previous school, he never had any issues because the teachers would ask him for the work if they saw he didn't turn it in and let him get it out of a locker if he forgot it. This new school is a very highly rated school and they don't think they should have to do anything like that and that they are showing "tough love" to him. I get that too but I have to keep reminding him that the ADHD contributes to his issues and that he is not doing these things to be a problem student or because he just doesn't care. So I am stuck in the middle and my son and this school issue is really the only stress in my life. I get upset at him myself and don't want to and figure that home schooling would suit him better even though he would miss the engineering. He also loves movie making (he makes his own movies) and art and I found a production company that is open to considering letting him be an unpaid intern for their next film. With homeschooling he can also take some cool art classes at our museum (they offer Blacksmithing, something he's always wanted to do). So I do feel I could find something to replace the engineering aspect. Mostly I just don't want him to fail out of school, which he is on target to do by the end of this semester anyway unless he aces the exams, and I want to not keep having school be an issue in our relationship. I figure I only have so much more time with him while he is still a kid and I don't want to spend the majority of that time being upset at him about not turning in work and fighting with principals and teachers to do the things they are supposed to do on the IEP. It is exhausting. My kid is a great kid other than the grades and I don't want him to think that I don't feel he is a great kid. But right now I spend too much time lecturing him and getting frustrated with him for forgetting to do simple things at school.

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    Welcome to SHS, Camtray! As far as your son's desire to stay in the school, it sounds like it's mostly because his friends are there...am I understanding correctly? Not because of what it offers him in terms of academics? If he appreciates the classes and environment, but is simply struggling with the academics because of executive function issues then it might possibly be worth getting an IEP facilitator involved. It truly depends on how much your son values his school experience. If he values it a lot, and you pull him out, there could possibly be a homeschool struggle from the get-go. If it's only the socialization that he values, then there are so many ways for him to retain his friendships from school, even while homeschooling. If you both find yourselves ready to take the plunge, though, there's a great beginners guide I recommend over at LetsHomeschoolHighschool.com: Absolute Beginner's Guide to Homeschooling High School

    Also, we have a Secular Homeschooler's Guide to High School here at SHS too: https://www.secularhomeschool.com/con...e-high-school/


  6. #5

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    So I'm about to pull my 9th grade daughter from a highly regarded state math science program (Alabama School of Fine Arts -- Math/Science Dept), but she's desperate to get out and miserable. (Passing, but having a horrible time socially, and experiencing crippling anxiety and analysis paralysis when it comes to some assignments. She's probably ADD also, but undiagnosed.) I'm considering the "Build Your Library" program, which seems to be mapped out day by day, or maybe taking a class or two through "Global Village". Both are homeschooling curricula aimed at secular families. Does anyone have experience with those? I was thinking we'd continue math in her current text (Geometry for Enjoyment and Challenge) and have her do Rosetta Stone for Latin.

    As far as your son goes... have you considered just letting him flunk out, and then homeschooling him? Hate to say it, but that way leaving would be on his shoulders instead of yours.

  7. #6
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    My 27 year old has never had any problems with her Beach High diploma:

    Beach High School

    Wes Beach On At-Risk Students, Gifted Children, and Homeschooling

    https://www.facebook.com/Beach-High-...4540406309598/

    Wes Beach: Pursuing alternative paths to college admission

    and is currently doing graduate work at Mills. She has received financial aid to attend many schools outside of California and has multiple undergraduate degrees.

    He is secular, affordable, and has a lot of experience with kids who have been failed by traditional high schools.

    He's also a very real, down to earth human being who will answer your emails and won't flood your inbox with a lot of flashing confusing glitzy advertisements for products you wouldn't need or use even if you could afford them which you can't.

    HTH.

    Topsy has been honest with us about the fact that Time4Learning is a major sponsor of this forum so I am going to be honest with you about the fact that I have never used Time4Learning so I can't possibly have a valid opinion about it.

    ETA: BestHomeschooling.org - Self-Direction, Engagement, and Success by Wes Beach

    This is an older article from a site that contains no ads or affiliate links.

    and this:

    http://a2zhomeschooling.com/laws/uni...e_school_laws/

    is a reputable (but ad-supported) resource for finding out about Ohio legalities. There's a page for for Alabama too, Naomi.
    Last edited by IEF; 12-02-2016 at 04:29 PM.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by naomi1431 View Post
    So I'm about to pull my 9th grade daughter from a highly regarded state math science program (Alabama School of Fine Arts -- Math/Science Dept), but she's desperate to get out and miserable. (Passing, but having a horrible time socially, and experiencing crippling anxiety and analysis paralysis when it comes to some assignments. She's probably ADD also, but undiagnosed.) I'm considering the "Build Your Library" program, which seems to be mapped out day by day, or maybe taking a class or two through "Global Village". Both are homeschooling curricula aimed at secular families. Does anyone have experience with those? I was thinking we'd continue math in her current text (Geometry for Enjoyment and Challenge) and have her do Rosetta Stone for Latin.

    As far as your son goes... have you considered just letting him flunk out, and then homeschooling him? Hate to say it, but that way leaving would be on his shoulders instead of yours.

    We use Global Village and are happy with it, but we use the elementary resources. I would suggest talking with the school directly or join the parents group on Facebook, as there are quite a few families who use the high school program.

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Researching Homeschooling a High School Student in Ohio