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  1. #1

    Default Newbie Here--Neeed help! Been through the ringer!

    Hello everyone. I am a mid western mom of 2 wonderful children. My boy (18) just graduated from a public HS and is currently attending college. Have never had any issues with him..ambitious, motivated and very even-mannered.
    Now my wonderful free spirit daughter, who will be 17 next month has given me a run for my money. With a plethora of health, emotional and psychological issues i am hitting rock bottom in terms of choices to get her through a proper HS education. She has a gifted mind, is academically gifted but putting it to use is the issue. She completed her freshman year but struggled greatly just to get by. Then her sophomore year she started with an online school but struggled with keeping a consistent schedule due to health issues and she ended up falling behind and only completed 2 courses (Science & English). Now we are faced with what to do. Would traditional home schooling be the best option (I could teach/guide her and keep her on a regular schedule)? I know nothing about home schooling and don't even know where to begin. How does she earn a diploma or is it just me certifying that she has met all the criteria required by the state? How does this look when applying for college? What do I even list it as on a college application? Are there organizations or groups I need to join and report her progress to? Basically, where do I begin?? And will all of her previous credits count towards the state requirements? Thank you all in advance for any help/suggestions or directions you can offer.

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  3. #2

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    Hello and welcome to the group!

    We have parents here who have homeschooled high school successfully.

    One of the first questions is what state are you in? That will determine options when it comes to diplomas and grades.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  4. #3

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    Welcome. But, oh my, where to start??

    I homeschooled both kids through high school. They are currently a freshman at Purdue and a sophomore at Univ of Iowa. It definitely CAN be done and is NOT a barrier to going to college. I'll try to answer your questions in parts.

    How does she earn a diploma or is it just me certifying that she has met all the criteria required by the state? How does this look when applying for college? What do I even list it as on a college application?
    You only have to issue a diploma if you want to do so. I ordered fancy ones for my kids online more as a rite of passage than as a necessary document. What colleges want to see is a transcript. For your daughter, if you homeschool her, it would have a combination of classes from her brick and mortar school, the online school, what she learns at home with you or on her own, and from any other providers you may decide to use. While she's a bit churchy, Lee Binz's website is a great place to start to look at homeschool transcripts. I believe she also has some YouTube videos? You can pay for her services, but I just looked at her examples and read some of her ebooks. They go on sale quite often for 99 cents.

    For classes you may know how to teach or don't want to teach, there are MOOCs (free online classes), dual credit at local campuses, tutors, etc.

    I personally followed my state's general graduation requirements, but we really looked at what the colleges wanted for admission requirements. If your daughter isn't sure where she wants to go yet, which is quite common at her age, at least look at your state's public university for an example to get you started.

    Are there organizations or groups I need to join and report her progress to?
    As Miriam correctly stated, this depends on what state you live in. Indiana's laws are very non-intrusive...show attendance for 180 days. You don't even have to register with the state if you don't want to.

    That being said, there are groups you CAN join that might help. You can look for local support groups. There's also a yahoo group for families homeschooling with an eye on college attendance afterward. And of course, there's the support you can find here.

    And will all of her previous credits count towards the state requirements?
    Most definitely. If she's earned the credits for the class, that can't be taken away. It would be no different if she earned credits at one high school then moved to another.

    Take a deep breath. This can be intimidating, especially with an older student. Reading some of the threads in the High School/Middle school sub-forum may answer some of your questions as well.

    Another thing to consider is taking 5 years to graduate high school instead of 4. If she's dealing with health and psychological issues, it may take some of the stress off. You can also school year round--maybe 4 days a week instead of 5. There are a lot of options.

    She has a gifted mind, is academically gifted but putting it to use is the issue. She completed her freshman year but struggled greatly just to get by. Then her sophomore year she started with an online school but struggled with keeping a consistent schedule due to health issues
    My daughter just recently let us know that she's been battling depression for at least 4 years. However, she was excellent at hiding it--good grades, very involved in activities, etc. She's now getting counseling on campus and trying some meds. Anyway, I asked if homeschooling helped, hurt, or had no effect on the depression. She felt that had she been in public school, the daily demands would have weighted her down and she "would have choked." She thinks she would have failed her senior year. Keep in mind that for her senior year of homeschooling, she still took three dual credit classes. However, the stuff we/she did at home (math and lit for example) we let slide sometimes.

    I hope this helps some.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  5. #4

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    Hi. And thanks for the welcome! i am in Illinois.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mariam View Post
    Hello and welcome to the group!

    We have parents here who have homeschooled high school successfully.

    One of the first questions is what state are you in? That will determine options when it comes to diplomas and grades.

  6. #5
    Site Administrator Arrived Aandwsmom's Avatar
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    Default

    Welcome!
    Yep, first. What State? That way we can guide you to your State laws on homeschooling.
    Second, many of us, myself included have successfully homeschooled through high school.
    You can do it. Your daughter should be able to transfer many of her credits and/or make up classes.
    What kind of learner is she? Would it be better for book curriculum or would an online course like Time4Learning be in her favor?
    Tons of help here on the forum as well as lots of curriculums listed on our curriculum page!
    If you need any help or have a question, feel free to PM me!
    Homeschooling Mom since 2008
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  7. #6

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    Welcome to the group! I would say even though it is not remotely secular, the HSLDA website will give you the legalese specific to homeschooling in Indiana (paperwork you need to file initially and as you go along if any---every state is different). You just get what you need and you don't need to join...
    Kids are so much more than a test score.
    Qualities not measured by a test: creativity, persistence, curiosity, humor, self-discipline, empathy, humility and so many more!

  8. #7

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    ...or skip the scare tactics on HSLDA and look up the Illinois page on homeschooling.
    Illinois Home-Schooling Home Page
    (thats illinois board of education.)

    It looks like you fill out the attached forms, promise to educate your kids, and you are good to go.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

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Newbie Here--Neeed help!  Been through the ringer!