Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1

    Default New to all of this - Hello from Iowa

    Hello all.
    I am happy to come across your website. My name is Jess and I am a research librarian in a public library. I am married to a professional fine art painter who spends most of his time and energy as a stay at home dad to our very precocious and hilarious 2 year old.

    My DH and I have been discussing homeschooling for as long as we've been discussing having kids. Now, I know that we are early to the game here with our child only being 2, but recently our "what if" homeschooling conversations have been becoming more serious.

    We are COMPLETE novices at this. I have tons of friends who homeschool their kids, but they are all Christian based groups and programs. I am a Christian, but my DH is not, so we felt that our son's formal education should be secular. So again, I'm glad I came across this site.

    As a professional researcher, I have, of course, been looking at possible philosophies and schools of thoughts. Boy oh boy are there a lot of options out there. I am not sure what kind of learner my son is just yet. He knows some of his colors, likes to count, and loves to do art. I feel that it will take some more years to understand how his little brain works, and from there find the right course of action for home schooling.

    My husband would be the teacher if we choose to homeschool, as I work outside the home. Are there many Homeschooling dad's out there? Also, my husband is full stop an artist with an artist's mind and a non-linear right brain thinker. I have some concerns about his ability to teach the little one in a structured setting. Not as a fault of him, but that he thinks so abstractly. (Does that make sense?) I've read up on unschooling, and I have some concerns of virtual NO structure (from my understanding).

    So as you can tell, I am in over my head here and we haven't even officially started!!

    Look forward to good conversation, helpful hints and an online community!

    All the Best,
    Jess

  2. Ratings Request Leaderboard
  3. #2

    Default

    Unschooling doesn't lack all structure....but it often has a very relaxed structure.

    For instance (we unschooled K-7) I let my daughter lead her own education....but we did have three goals every day: Reading a little, Writing a little, doing a little math. How she wanted to integrate these three things into her day was completely up to her. She did a ton of project based and hands on learning. She loved research projects and creative projects.

    Don't sell hubby short because he's artistic. There are a LOT of ways to successfully teach elementary school

    If hubby is the guy doing the homeschooling....have him hop on and ask all the questions he wants We'd love to help!

    We've got a couple of regular dads here with good advice, too.
    Last edited by CrazyMom; 09-21-2015 at 09:10 PM.
    Retired Home Schooler
    One kid, Elle, Sophomore at The University of Michigan studying Cell/ Molecular Biology Go Blue!
    One hubby, 23yrs

    Not a fan of homophobe, Everett Piper, who is sometimes promoted by others at this site. Read about him here:: http://www.rightwingwatch.org/conten...itics-hate-god
    CAUTION: might make blasphemous remarks that could potentially offend religious people. Please use ignore feature if sensitive.

  4. #3

    Default

    It's a way of life, where you integrate learning into everything you do. I agree with CrazyMom--a little writing, a little reading, a little math, until they get older. I guess the big discussion in the near future would be how you both envision teaching reading.

    But mostly, you need to support and believe in your husband's choices. You both need a say, as you are both in charge of raising him, but in the end, he is the one spending all day with him and teaching. Ask what you can do to help him. It might be that you research curriculum and present him with some options (as you are finding out, it's a little crazy at trying to pick curriculum and style). It may be that he would like you to teach one subject.

    But relax. Early elementary is all about read-alouds, curiosity, and loving the process of learning.

    And welcome!

  5. #4

    Default

    Welcome! Like the others have said, you dont need to try re-creating a school-at-home.

    Homeschooling is just an extention of parenting, especially for these early years! I think the hardest thing for me (I researched a zillion homeschooling styles and philosophies before *starting* too!) was just letting go of my expectations and meeting my son where he is at (I still struggle with this).

    You dont need a formal preschool or kindergarten curriculum that your DH has to follow religiously. Let him be him with your son how he is naturally, odds are it will all work out fine. He needs a homeschooling parent thats interested in him, that can facilitate and mentor him*. Much more than someone who will sit him at a desk in your home and have him practice copywork.

    Keep asking questions, a lot of us were in your philosophical homeschooling shoes some years ago!

    *And take him to the library.
    Last edited by alexsmom; 09-21-2015 at 10:01 PM.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  6. #5

    Default

    Hello and welcome!

    Feel free to ask lots of questions. We are just starting our third year, but we started with no plan and we figured it out.

    We are unschooling, but that doesn't mean that there is no structure to our day. I am writing about it on a another thread, so I won't rehash it here. Needless to say, I am quite happy with it and how it is working for us.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  7. #6
    Senior Member Enlightened azdad's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    175

    Default

    The book that got us going with homeschooling (and many others) is "The Well Trained Mind." It lays out the educational case for homeschooling and also goes through one writer's version of day by day and year by year milestones for a curriculum (definitely not an unschooling approach). I recommend it highly.

    We have departed from WTM in many ways but still use and love the more or less secular history curriculum (Story of the World) We are not unschoolers overall, but I do try to have some strands that are student directed as well as using traditional science, math, and history curricula. I like using a set curriculum for some subjects as it helps me to stay disciplined to get through some material every week. If you find a curriculum written by smart people with experience teaching the subject, it can be a big relief to just open the book and find out what cool stuff you are doing this week. In addition to SOTW, Pandia's REAL Science Odyssey curriculum is another favorite of ours and many on this site.

    Lots of reviews and debates here on the site over various approaches - you and your husband will just have to pick through and find your own best fit. It is a great journey!
    7 year old boy / 2nd grade homeschooler
    12 year old girl /7 grade public school student

  8. #7

    Default

    I just realized I posted on here twice. I didn't think one of the threads went through. Sorry for any repetition!
    Thanks for the well wishes everyone!!

  9. #8
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,728
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    I am happy to come across your website. My name is Jess and I am a research librarian in a public library. I am married to a professional fine art painter who spends most of his time and energy as a stay at home dad to our very precocious and hilarious 2 year old.

    My DH and I have been discussing homeschooling for as long as we've been discussing having kids. Now, I know that we are early to the game here with our child only being 2, but recently our "what if" homeschooling conversations have been becoming more serious.

    We are COMPLETE novices at this. I have tons of friends who homeschool their kids, but they are all Christian based groups and programs. I am a Christian, but my DH is not, so we felt that our son's formal education should be secular. So again, I'm glad I came across this site.
    SO glad you did too! Terrific to have you here, Jess!

    As a professional researcher, I have, of course, been looking at possible philosophies and schools of thoughts. Boy oh boy are there a lot of options out there. I am not sure what kind of learner my son is just yet. He knows some of his colors, likes to count, and loves to do art. I feel that it will take some more years to understand how his little brain works, and from there find the right course of action for home schooling.
    There are arguments for and against understanding your child's "learning style", but for me it made all the difference in choosing the right tools, curricula, and teaching style for my sons.

    My husband would be the teacher if we choose to homeschool, as I work outside the home. Are there many Homeschooling dad's out there?
    Most definitely! Some terrific ones right here at SHS. I hope you're husband will drop in and introduce himself soon too. This is a super fun place to hang out.

    Also, my husband is full stop an artist with an artist's mind and a non-linear right brain thinker. I have some concerns about his ability to teach the little one in a structured setting. Not as a fault of him, but that he thinks so abstractly. (Does that make sense?) I've read up on unschooling, and I have some concerns of virtual NO structure (from my understanding).
    There are all kinds of ways of interpreting what unschooling means - - as many as there are unschoolers, really! I can tell you a little about OUR experience, though. I did more structured schooling with my two in the elementary years. I wanted to make sure they had a basis in reading/writing/math/science/history. But that didn't mean that I followed the "recommended" grade levels for what should be learned. As long as they were making progress in their growth and learning in those areas, I felt confident. Once they had all those basics, we moved into a much more unschooling approach in the middle school years. They were able to follow their own interests, and we did a LOT of field trips/hands-on learning/experiential learning during that time. As they moved into the high school years, they each felt a desire to pull back into more structured curriculum again, so I would say they combined unschooling with structured learning at about a 50/50 ratio during high school.


  10. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by azdad View Post
    The book that got us going with homeschooling (and many others) is "The Well Trained Mind." It lays out the educational case for homeschooling and also goes through one writer's version of day by day and year by year milestones for a curriculum (definitely not an unschooling approach). I recommend it highly.

    We have departed from WTM in many ways but still use and love the more or less secular history curriculum (Story of the World) We are not unschoolers overall, but I do try to have some strands that are student directed as well as using traditional science, math, and history curricula. I like using a set curriculum for some subjects as it helps me to stay disciplined to get through some material every week. If you find a curriculum written by smart people with experience teaching the subject, it can be a big relief to just open the book and find out what cool stuff you are doing this week. In addition to SOTW, Pandia's REAL Science Odyssey curriculum is another favorite of ours and many on this site.

    Lots of reviews and debates here on the site over various approaches - you and your husband will just have to pick through and find your own best fit. It is a great journey!
    Just a little warning: I, too, have an artistic mind (that sounds really presumptious, but I'm hoping everyone knows what I mean) and WTM gives me panic attacks. I still have it because it is a great resource, as AZdad mentioned, but I can't read it all, and I definitely can't follow. I'm stating this, because as a research librarian and the non-hsing parent you might love it but it may be absolutely impossible for your husband.

  11. #10

    Default

    Ah yes. WTM which was soooo much not for DS9. Dante in grade 2? Force them to eat peas until they submit to it? LOL I call it WTF.
    But some people like it. TBH as far as resources go, this forum and talking to homeschoolers IRL has been way more helpful. If WTM suggests it, and its good and useful, others will too.

    No offense meant to WTMers
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
New to all of this - Hello from Iowa