Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Junior Member Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    2

    Question Where do I start?

    I have recently become a SAHM of 3. My oldest DS will be entering 5th grade this year and my middle DS is entering kindergarten this school year and my DD still has a year to go before school. My husband and I have been discussing the possibilities of home schooling. The truth is it scares the living bejebus out of me to think that I will be in charge of my childrens education but on the other hand the public school system in my opinion is failing my oldest. They keep changing the math programs and have no time to work with students individual who may struggle. So I guess what I'm trying to ask for is any tips for a possible newbie. Any good literature I should read? tips on how to get started and so on....any and all help would be greatly appreciated.

  2. Ratings Request Leaderboard
  3. #2

    Default

    Welcome!

    Lots of people will say it, but you can do it. Really.

    Books... Well, I always think it's good for a newbie to read something structured like The Well-Trained Mind and something unstructured like Free-Range Homeschooling or Project-Based Homeschooling. And then you can see what resonates with you and what you react against.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

  4. #3

    Default

    Expect a learning curve for yourself the first year and realize it's okay if it takes time to find your groove The curriculum lists and reviews here have been a wonderful asset, definitely worth looking at.
    Tamarin - 7, Lemur - 6, Howler - 4, and Capuchin - 1.

    Six Monkeys in the Country, my blog about homeschooling, farm life, raising young children and my ridiculous opinions.

  5. #4

    Default

    Loaded question!

    I agree with the feedback you've received here. Starting with something structured and then going from there can help. Some parents find the idea of structure makes them feel more comfortable - more like they can "school at home". But I think most realize how much freedom they actually have, and that they need to worry too much about doing everything in a certain way.

    Knowing how your sons (and later, your daughter) learn is very helpful. Are they visual? Do they learn best by listening? How about learning by doing? If your kindergartener learns best through hands-on lessons, then workbooks won't do him any good. If your 5th grader does best by listening and watching something, then it will be frustrating to try to make him memorize history books.

    Sometimes it's nice to start off very structured, and then relax and/or change where needed.

    Also, if your eldest son has been attending school, you might want a deschooling period. Though if you plan to homeschool starting now and he's been on summer break, this may not be necessary at all.

    Feel free to browse the boards, dig around, and ask more questions!
    Wendy
    Mumsy to Gavin (13-year-old artsy boy) and Rowan (3-year-old disco queen)

  6. #5

    Default

    Read this (from your library or new if you want) The First Year of Homeschooling Your Child: Your Complete Guide to Getting Off to the Right Start: Linda Dobson: 9780761527886: Amazon.com: Books

    It goes through various philosophies of schooling and will give you a decent idea of what to expect for each type, more or less. Remember when you start out, that you don't have to have your kids to every page or every problem. If they understand, it is fine for them to do enough to show you that. It is also fine for them to jump ahead or go into more depth. If you pick out a style of schooling and decide mid year you don't like it (or your kids don't like it,) feel free to dump it.

    There is no magic to being a teacher. I can almost positively say that at your son's school the teachers have teacher's manuals that tell them what to say when in order to teach the lesson. Many of the curricula available for homeschoolers are just the same. The truly good teacher is the one who has a few tricks to help struggling students. You will be able to find those tricks by looking them up on the internet or coming and asking us. I have been able to find more things that teachers have oohed and ahhed over, just because I have more time.

    Oh, and every new teacher is a bit worried if they will do well by all of their kids. So you do have lots in common with them.

  7. #6
    Senior Member Evolved
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    700
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    "Where do I start?"

    Start with where your kids are, and work toward where you'd like them to be (and, as best you can discern, where they'd like to be) when they're done.
    What do they love? What are your dreams for them?

    Some big thinking will go nicely with the books others have recommended, and then you'll have an idea of how to wade through the 5,000 different curriculum options available. If you want a sample list for kindergarten, what I'm doing with my DS is at White Hawk Academy: Curriculum and Materials or look for the 2013-2014 planning thread to see others.
    Mama of one DS, class of 2026;
    recovering schoolteacher;
    lifelong bookworm

  8. #7
    Banned Enlightened
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    125

    Default

    First off, I commend you on your bravery. I don’t know if I would’ve had the guts to pull my kid out of school for anything less than extreme bullying. We never tried out p.s. so hs’ing is all we know.

    I didn’t really "prepare" myself for homeschooling. I just started with ABC’s, 123’s and progressed from there. I understand that your situation is a bit trickier since your oldest is in 5th Grade. A lot of first-timers here go the whole-hog and purchase a boxed curriculum like Oak Meadow. You should check it out and see if a) you can afford it and b) if it strikes your fancy.

    I just ordered this book from Amazon: Home Learning Year by Year: How to Design a Homeschool Curriculum from Preschool Through High School: Rebecca Rupp: 9780609805855: Amazon.com: Books
    A lot of people seem to swear by it.

    As you may have already noticed, there are several people here from your state so they should be able to help with your state’s requirements.

    Good luck! You can do it.

  9. #8
    Senior Member Enlightened
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    180

    Default

    Like you, when we started homeschooling it was because we didn't think the school options were right for our kids. At the time, they were in a small private school. The first year of homeschooling was challenging - I switched up curriculum a few times, fought with the kids over what I thought they should be doing (trying to replicate school at home), bought too much stuff and lost my guest room to a barely-used homeschool room. Because of a move to a new town, we put the kids in public school this year - what an eye-opener that has been! I now know that homeschooling is what is best for my kids at this point in their lives. They are 3rd and 4th grade level. Ask your oldest child (since he has "done" school) what he likes and dislikes. My kids HATE worksheets and I did not take this into account when we homeschooled that first year. I constantly worried that they were not spending enough time doing schoolwork. I now realize how much wasted time is in a day at public school, so a few hours of engaging time spent homeschooling will be much more beneficial. My kids like projects, so I found a curriculum that is project-based. Don't be afraid to try different things. Good luck!

  10. #9
    Senior Member Arrived Avalon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    AB
    Posts
    1,307

    Default

    I always suggest that people start with reading aloud. Choose a few books that the kids might like (a novel, some picture books, a science-y book, a math story book), and sit down on the couch and invite the kids to join you. Make it part of your daily routine. You might find that lots of questions and interesting things come out of your reading, so you can pursue those. Once you're done reading, you could start the older one on some math. That would be just fine to start with, and you can add more stuff later.

  11. #10
    Junior Member Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Thank you all for the great tips, books , and encouragement! It is much appreciated! I am heading to the library Monday and will check out the books some of you suggested.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
Where do I start?