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  1. #11

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    So what do you think would circle time look for older / elementary kids? I like quabbin's ideas, they would seem to work for most kids.


    We need a better morning routine.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

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  3. #12
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    I just figured we'd be sitting down, singing a song or two, talking about our plan for the day, and doing the calendar pieces. Today DS did the calendar before I even got up and how much can we talk about our day, lol?

    Thanks all for the suggestions. I will prob skip the candle lighting until the kids are older, haha. A little yoga or exercise would be nice. I could use my What Does your K Need to Know for read aloud tales and have them pick a few books for the week. Maybe do a counting song or rhyme with some Velcro pics on the felt board to keep them interested. It's a start!
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  4. #13
    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mariam View Post
    So what do you think would circle time look for older / elementary kids?
    I plan to keep my routine for a long time, I can see us using it in HS. A little centering meditation, a read aloud, a choice of copy work / map work (more detailed) / journal, and a little news or podcast.

    TFZ - We liked Aesop's fables too as part of our morning time when the kids were younger. When the weather is better, we take a quick morning walk as part of the routine. Yes fire and toddlers is a bad combo. I still have to watch dd - she is just everywhere all the time lol.
    Last edited by RTB; 07-27-2016 at 09:06 PM.
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

  5. #14
    Senior Member Arrived Elly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mariam View Post
    So what do you think would circle time look for older / elementary kids? I like quabbin's ideas, they would seem to work for most kids.


    We need a better morning routine.
    DS is 8. I often start by picking up a book and reading to draw him in. I find it a useful time to read short stories or poetry that we don't get to the rest of the day. We do some SQUILT (music), art, games etc. We each get to pick something, although there may be things I want to cover, like memory work. It tends to be mostly oral (or aural!) stuff. We've sometimes done MadLibs or an activity book, too, but not so schoolish

    Does that help?

    Elly
    4th year of homeschooling DS, now 9!

  6. #15

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    This is what I have planned for our morning routine for the coming year (I have an almost 12 and a 10 year old):

    We start the morning routine with the virtue of that week (honesty, respect, assertiveness, things like that). We discuss it, we make a mindmap, we watch short movie clips around it, we do a roleplay that relates to it.
    Then we read some mythology, or (since we do Build Your Library grade 7 with the oldest) we do the task around world religion for that day (my youngest joins in with that)
    We go over our memorywork (this is different subjects: poetry, math, music, foreign languages, which for us are French and English, we live in Belgium and our native language is Dutch).
    4 days in the week we do squilt, on the 5th day we choose a French or English song to listen too, discuss the lyrics, for a better comprehension of those languages.
    For geography we do Drawing Around The World - Europe. Basically, it's memorizing the countries of Europe.
    Art appreciation: We look at paintings from a chosen artist during that week and discuss them (the techniques, colors, why we love them, ...)
    Freewriting: we have 4 days of freewriting (5 minutes) and on the fifth day they pick one of their texts to edit
    Bedtime Math: it's a site that gives you math problem every day, so we do one and discuss it. It also comes with some short information on a topic that we can discuss or investigate further.

    We also do the calendar. Not in Dutch, but in French and English, as well as read up on news (in French and English, yes languages are very important in our morning work LOL)

    Hope this helps.

    Leslie
    Leslie
    Homeschooling two boys (DS'06 en DS'04)

  7. #16
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Thank you for all the suggestions! I found this https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/...ial-Ed-2005485 and printed/laminated just a few of the pages, but it's working out well.

    Here's what we've started this week:
    I used the cards to make a little list of what we are doing- calendar, weather, song, story, exercise, and jobs.
    Calendar - add the day (we'll add patterns later) talk about what we are doing today, then yesterday was... tomorrow will be...
    Weather- check the window and thermometer and pick a few words
    Song- she had cards for familiar songs and I'll add more. I have five to choose from and they each pick one to sing.
    Story- this week is Little Red Hen, but I'm going to add on weekly in a basket like you all suggested and have them each pick a story
    Exercise- she has cards with exercises and numbers to choose from. I can't believe how much DS likes this part.
    Jobs- I figure this is a good time for a morning break and chores. This week we are just making beds. I'll add in next week. Make your beds and paint the exterior of the house! Hahaha
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  8. #17

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    Wishing we had any sort of Morning Anything these days...tried it a few times with good intentions for some sort of morning structure for DS5 who at 4 would have loved a preschooly sort of morning routine. But I couldn't keep it up.

    Our morning thing now is DD12 and I taking turns shredding the cabbage for the breakfast (now that we had to stop having oatmeal again because the youngest got the food allergies back) and making coffee while the little ones eat a banana and watch TV to buy us time. Then once the kids are fed, I nurse DS2 while having my coffee and checking emails before hitting dishes or sweeping up or starting laundry, then hustling little ones out the door to the local preschooler playtime at the Y.

    That's about it. Then we get home in time for me to make lunch and nap down the toddler, do more chores and try to wedge in supervised Khan Academy for DS8.

    As for teaching colors, calendars, weather, and all those cute little preschooly things, oddly enough it never occurred to me to do it with DD, and she learned to tell time and use calendars on her own when she got old enough to want to know how long it would be til we did certain things, or how many days til Christmas and so on. With DS5, I got one of those pocket calendar kits and did the whole bulletin board thing, with today's weather and cute little pictures to put on it, and days of the week to learn and all...and satisfying as it was, we never used it for anything. Somehow those things get learned as part of life, even if they aren't taught explicitly, so for me they were hubris, just there to reassure me that I was doing something that turned out to be totally superfluous.

    Harmless fun if you have the time and inclination, but nothing bad happens at all if you totally skip it. They don't wind up being 12 and ignornant of months, days of the week, seasons, or weather.
    Last edited by crunchynerd; 10-26-2016 at 10:43 PM.
    Middle-aged mom of 4 kids spanning a 10-year age range, homeschooling since 2009, and a public school mom also, since 2017.

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