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  1. #1

    Default High School Physics

    I am trying to get a jump on the rest of high school. I was wondering if anyone had good suggestions for physics textbooks?

    My son loves math and science. We are doing Chang's AP Chemistry currently. I don't know if we will do physics Junior or Senior year. It will depend probably on how much calculus he will need. He loves trig, but if it is better to wait until he has more calculus under his belt, I can have him do an elective next year, and physics senior year.

    Reading comprehension is not his strength, so clear writing is a must and he responds well to visually pleasing texts. That said, math and science are his strengths, so I don't want to drop the rigor, if that makes sense.

    Any textbook suggestions?

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  3. #2

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    I like Giancoli's Physics, but it might not be as readable as you would like. Pearson is not too bad, nor is Holt's Physics.

    The most readable is Conceptual Physics by Paul Hewitt, but based on where your son is mathematically, I don't think it's rigorous enough for what he'd want.

    He should be able to take physics Junior year. Calculus based physics mostly is taught at university level. If he has trig under his belt, that is excellent as he'll need it for all the vector-related problems in physics.

    Another option is to search for online texts and see if he likes any of those.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University graduate: BS in Computer Science, minor in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  4. #3

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    Cool. Thanks, Inmom. I probably will use Giancoli.

  5. #4

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    How new a book do I need for physics? Do they even cover very new material?

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by HobbitinaHobbitHole View Post
    How new a book do I need for physics? Do they even cover very new material?
    Unless the student wants to cover string theory, or cutting edge (for today) quantum stuff, they don't need a new book. Heck, I still sometimes teach out of a Giancoli text from 1991. I'm sure you can get a newer edition than that, but still be inexpensively used. The basics are still the same.

    There is a a member of our group who used to be more active there, HomescienceGeek, who not only teaches different levels of physics to local kids, but posts her lessons online on her blog. You may find some useful stuff there.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University graduate: BS in Computer Science, minor in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  7. #6

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    Thanks, cool. The website lists labs, too. Awesome!

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High School Physics