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Thread: Also Chemistry

  1. #1

    Default Also Chemistry

    Ok--I did not want to hijack the other thread, so I hope this is not annoying to post this.

    I would like to do HS chem this upcoming year. My son just finished AOPS Intermediate Algebra for Algebra II. He loves chemistry. It is by far, his favorite science.

    He has serious issues with safety and precision, so I have to be very careful with the labs. That said, I need this to be a lab science. I am not sure what text I am going to use, but he can handle AP/College theoretical stuff just fine, and he will want something mathematically rigorous, not just conceptual.

    So my question is if anyone has suggestions on how to combine high-level chem theory with labs that for safety reasons are going to have to be geared for little kids? (He is not a little kid, but that is where we are on safety.)

    I would like to have colleges regard this as a serious, rigorous class at least from the theory perspective with enough lab material for the labs to count.

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  3. #2

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    We were in the same situation. I could have taught my two chemistry, but I absolutely did not want the expense and safety issues doing the labs at home.

    So my kids took chemistry (2 semesters) dual enrollment at a local Purdue campus. Normally I'd say look into this, but it all depends on how local campuses near you will deal with classes this fall. While your son may qualify to be enrolled, if they are not doing in-person labs for chemistry, I don't see the point....unless they do something like the students watch the professor do the lab, they get the data, then they write up the report from there. Certainly not as interesting or fun.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University graduate: BS in Computer Science, minor in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  4. #3

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    Thank you for answering.

    Unfortunately, a local college is not an option for us, so I have to figure out how to formulate something on my own. They give preference to people from the local brick and mortar schools and it is in an adjacent county.

    I need my labs to be much safer than a college lab could be, anyway. He has issues pouring things accurately and I cannot imagine him using a Bunsen burner. If I have to do things as demos, I can, but I would much rather him participate, even if it is a really modified version of what the lab ought to be for high school.

    That said, I guess it depends on what colleges count or don't count. From a HS perspective I look at it is part of an IEP, but I don't know what colleges think of that or what their preferences are in what is done. When college comes around, he is going to need some kind of adaptation for sure. This is not likely to be something about him which will likely change.

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by HobbitinaHobbitHole View Post
    That said, I guess it depends on what colleges count or don't count. From a HS perspective I look at it is part of an IEP, but I don't know what colleges think of that or what their preferences are in what is done. When college comes around, he is going to need some kind of adaptation for sure. This is not likely to be something about him which will likely change.
    I will do some more thinking and looking around for something online to help you. One place to look is HomeschoolScienceGeek's blog, where she listed the lessons she used for Intro Chem and for High School Chem. She is usually pretty good about listing websites used and where she sources her lab materials. She was/is a member of SHS, but I've not seen her on the forums in a long time.

    In the meantime, I can kinda-sorta answer your issues in the last paragraph. From college visits with my kids, I think it depends on what your son wants to major in. Since my son was applying to schools of science or engineering, they wanted a fairly documented set of lab science classes. For my daughter, a liberal arts major, not having in-person labs were not as big of a deal (although she had them).

    I hope this helps a bit.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University graduate: BS in Computer Science, minor in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  6. #5

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    Also, here is a text online that is written in language more understood by students: Chemistry, the Awesomest Science
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University graduate: BS in Computer Science, minor in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  7. #6

    Default

    Thank you so much!

    We have a lot of issues because he wants to major and math and therefore he will also need to take a lot of science. That would be awesome and fine except for the labs. At some point we are going to need some kind of accommodation. He wants to be a theoretical mathematician. I have no idea how practical that is given his deal, but I know he has to take a lot of science -- which is only problematic on the experimental part. He does love science theory.

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Also Chemistry