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  1. #1

    Default Starting homeschool in high school?

    My child wants to move from traditional school to homeschooling, but I'm not sure how to approach starting it. I've never homeschooled before and I'm already fairly useless when it comes to helping him with his homework, so I'm not sure how well I would be able to teach or even just grade assignments. All the state cares about are the number of days of schooling, but pretty much all state colleges require Indiana Core 40 or Academic Honors Diploma curriculum so I want to make sure I can meet those and all other requirements. Does anyone have any advice?

    Example of state college requirements for homeschoolers: https://www.pfw.edu/admissions/areas...anscripts.html

    Indiana's Core 40 requirements: https://www.doe.in.gov/sites/default...-june-2018.pdf

  2. T4L In Forum Oct19
  3. #2

    Default

    Hi schnln01

    I'm also in Indiana, and homeschooled my kids from mid-elementary age all the way through high school. If your goal is college admittance, you should check with those that your child has in mind as to what their admission requirements are, and fulfill those. You are correct in that the state only requires proof of attendance for 180 days (and that's only if they ask!). After that, you can set the curriculum as you want.

    How are you going to approach his education? Put together classes on your own, pick and choose sources, go with a total online supplier?
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  4. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    Hi schnln01

    I'm also in Indiana, and homeschooled my kids from mid-elementary age all the way through high school. If your goal is college admittance, you should check with those that your child has in mind as to what their admission requirements are, and fulfill those. You are correct in that the state only requires proof of attendance for 180 days (and that's only if they ask!). After that, you can set the curriculum as you want.

    How are you going to approach his education? Put together classes on your own, pick and choose sources, go with a total online supplier?
    I'm not sure. I literally know nothing about homeschooling, but so far everything I've looked at looks prohibitively expensive.

  5. #4
    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
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    Default

    Hello and welcome to the group!

    There are a variety of different single subject curricula to use that are moderately priced. Complete programs tend to be higher priced, I personally am not a fan, but people do use them. It is also possible to build your own.

    Ask lots of questions.
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

  6. #5

    Default

    I agree with RTB, buying separately is usually cheaper. There are also all kinds of free resources on the internet, even for high school.

    I lot also depends on how independent your teen can be in terms of his education. Some high school homeschooled kids do quite a bit of work on their own.

    But DO ask lots of questions. You may also want to look at the Homeschooling High School/Middle School and College Prep subforms here. There are curriculum topics within those.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  7. #6

    Default

    Hello,

    There are a few things you want to keep in mind when putting together a plan.

    Why are you homeschooling in the first place? Is it because school isn't challenging, are there personal issues, do they want to be done with school sooner, or school is not addressing their needs? This may determine how you homeschool.

    What does your child want to do after high school? Do they want to go to college, enter the workforce? If college, do they have high expectations for themselves to enter a competitive program or are they looking at community college?

    Once you are able to answer those questions you will want to think about how do they want to learn. Are video lessons enough? Do they like more book learning or do they want to move outside the box with their learning? Are they self motivated or do they need help moving forward?

    Once you know how they want to learn, then you can look for curriculum that will work for them. There are ones that are set for high achieving students and others for those who just want to graduate. And other ways of creating a program that is highly creative.

    There are lots of ways to fulfill the requirements for high school. There are all-in-one programs that are very expensive to the free online programs such as Khan Academy for math and other subjects. I know the options can be overwhelming but once broken-down can be manageable.

    Ask questions. Welcome to the forum!
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  8. #7
    Junior Member Newbie fractalkitty's Avatar
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    Default

    We do a mix of curriculum/learning in our house at that level. You could also see if there are charter schools that allow you to homeschool while supplying various curriculum options (this is working well for my oldest). They let us choose our approach, school at home and provide a transcript. My area is math education, so if you want help there, let me know. There are lots of options and I find that a motivated student may do a lot more than they would have in public school. Homeschooling lets them dive into their passions and figure out who they are.

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