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  1. #1
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    Lightbulb What do you think about avoiding writing homeschool high school course descriptions?

    Although many, if not most colleges like to see some kind of course descriptions to accompany a homeschool student's transcript, there are several strategies for those who simply want to avoid having to write course descriptions! One method is, of course, to search for those specific colleges who don't want course descriptions or a lot of information. Some colleges may have only five minutes to evaluate each applicant and don't have a lot of time to look at everybody closely. Sometimes these are the colleges that don't require a lot of course descriptions. Of course, the difficulty with this is that you don't know in advance whether they're going to need course descriptions or not. Sometimes, they don't publicize that information.

    A second strategy is to use testing scores to supplement your transcripts. This means that you provide outside documentation from tests, which can reflect the grades and the evaluation that you've done on your children as represented on their transcripts. Some testing options are SAT subject tests, AP exams, and CLEP exams. If you don't have thorough documentation, sometimes colleges will ask you for a GED or ask a student to take a GED.

    A third option is to have your student take courses through another classroom situation, such as community college, online classes or distance learning, essentially something that has a transcript that will come from a third party. There are some colleges, though, that will still require course descriptions even though your child will already have some community college classes, so it's not always the perfect solution, but it's a solution.

    A fourth solution to avoiding course descriptions is what I call the "Backdoor Strategy." This is when your student goes to community college and later on gets their foot in the door to a 4-year university. Universities want to know that a student can handle college level work, which is why they want to know information about your homeschool. Community college is college-level work, so some universities will give you direct admission and some universities in some states will require an automatic transfer agreement to public universities if your child has an AA degree (a two-year degree) from a community college. The university may provide admission based on performance in class, and with an AA degree a student may enter as a transfer student rather than a high school senior. If they have two years of community college and an AA, then when they apply for college they may apply as a transfer student. Of course, different rules apply, and sometimes scholarships are much less with this method. In addition,

    If you're using community college classes as a way to avoid course descriptions, then make sure that your child understands that they need excellent grades. They need to get all As and Bs at the community college in order to do really well on their college admission for the next step. You do have to be careful, as it can be a lot of hard work.

  2. T4L In Forum Sept19
  3. #2

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    I dont understand why anyone would feel the need to avoid it.

    As homeschool parents, we have mastered the perils of World History, Algebra, Trigonometry, Shakespeare, a foreign language, and Chemistry. We have guided our kids through research papers, five-paragraph essays, persuasive pieces, and poetry. We have instilled in them good work habits, integrity, and to not procrastinate.
    Why would we feel intimidated or daunted by writing course descriptions?
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  4. #3

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    My DD did not need course descriptions for where she applied, but my son did. I started writing them when they were freshmen in high school. I figured it would be easier to do when they were completing the course rather than waiting 3-4 years afterward. I also kept a list of materials/texts used and grading rationale.

    Even had I not needed them, I think it provided a way for me to focus on goals and what I'd like them to learn for each course.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    My DD did not need course descriptions for where she applied, but my son did. I started writing them when they were freshmen in high school. I figured it would be easier to do when they were completing the course rather than waiting 3-4 years afterward. I also kept a list of materials/texts used and grading rationale.

    Even had I not needed them, I think it provided a way for me to focus on goals and what I'd like them to learn for each course.
    That's awesome you pay such attention to your children!

  6. #5

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    Well, I'll be judgmental. If it works out that your student wants to attend a school that doesn't require them or ends up primarily doing DE for high school, then that's great. It's always nice to be able to take a shortcut when it makes sense.

    However, if you can't be fussed to write course descriptions for your kid, then you shouldn't homeschool high school. This is their future. They should have the right to access their records. You should keep records because they're necessary to open doors they might want to open. I mean, good grief, this is your job. I don't like all the elements of it either, but I'm not going to limit my kids' options based on not wanting to do some paperwork that is, honestly, just not that time consuming. If I really was unable to do it, I'd keep book lists and a some messy notes and hire someone. There are consultants who will help you if you need it.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
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  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by barryparker View Post
    That's awesome you pay such attention to your children!
    They are my kids. Why would I not?!?
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

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What do you think about avoiding writing homeschool high school course descriptions?