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  1. #1

    Default World History/Geography suggestions?

    My son is a math/science guy more than a humanities kind of guy. Normally he hates social studies, but to my delight, and surprise, we started using Joy Hakim: History of US, this year, and it is working really well.

    Does anyone have some suggestions about what to use for World History/Geography? I am going to supplement with Crash Course, but I need a spine.

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  3. #2

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    Throwing an alternate idea out there for you to mull over.

    My math/science son also hated social studies. For World History, does it have the be the status quo? For his high school world history credit, DS spent one semester reading trade books on Mesoamerican history and writing essays about what he read. For the other semester of history he used Discovering Music which looks at the development of music in western culture from 1600 to 1914, bringing in politics, art, economics, and war. (Example: The change from the Church being the sponsor of music composition to the sponsorship of royalty, to the payment of artists from the general public.)

    Maybe let him work with you on his interests in history and focus on those? You can also do the history of world-wide science! Since he likes Hakim, maybe her Story of Science would work?

    As an added note, after a fabulous class in the History of the Middle East up to WWI at Purdue, taught be a great professor, my computer science major son added a history minor. He loves the history not generally learned by the rest of the public. Might your son like the quirky stuff as well?
    Last edited by inmom; 09-27-2018 at 02:24 PM.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    Throwing an alternate idea out there for you to mull over.

    My math/science son also hated social studies. For World History, does it have the be the status quo? For his high school world history credit, DS spent one semester reading trade books on Mesoamerican history and writing essays about what he read. For the other semester of history he used Discovering Music which looks at the development of music in western culture from 1600 to 1914, bringing in politics, art, economics, and war. (Example: The change from the Church being the sponsor of music composition to the sponsorship of royalty, to the payment of artists from the general public.)

    Maybe let him work with you on his interests in history and focus on those? You can also do the history of world-wide science! Since he likes Hakim, maybe her Story of Science would work?

    As an added note, after a fabulous class in the History of the Middle East up to WWI at Purdue, taught be a great professor, my computer science major son added a history minor. He loves the history not generally learned by the rest of the public. Might your son like the quirky stuff as well?
    Honestly, I go back and forth on this in my head. Part of me feels like he should be literate in certain, basic things, and then on the other, I know he might be better served in some alternative way. I am having issues in my head with world history because while it is worthy as a topic, it is so large and I am not sure that it can be given the attention it deserves in only one year, anyway. I mean, we are doing US history from reconstruction on, this year and I am nervous about having enough time, to cover all I want to cover, if that makes sense. It is hard for me to see how you can do world history decently in that same amount of time. That said, I don't want him to be one of those people who is clueless about the larger world.

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by HobbitinaHobbitHole View Post
    Honestly, I go back and forth on this in my head. Part of me feels like he should be literate in certain, basic things, and then on the other, I know he might be better served in some alternative way. I am having issues in my head with world history because while it is worthy as a topic, it is so large and I am not sure that it can be given the attention it deserves in only one year, anyway. I mean, we are doing US history from reconstruction on, this year and I am nervous about having enough time, to cover all I want to cover, if that makes sense. It is hard for me to see how you can do world history decently in that same amount of time. That said, I don't want him to be one of those people who is clueless about the larger world.
    I struggled with this as well. Heck, my kids studied US history all through the 3 years of middle school, as there is so much, and we'd go off on tangents and really explore the events and the reasons behind the events. And world history is far more vast.

    I finally decided that if I forced it, my son wouldn't retain the history he learned anyway. Better to let him enjoy the parts he found fascinating, which has led to an interest in learning more as he's gotten older. There's a lot of world history many of us don't know, even though we took world history courses. I, for instance, am not well versed in the history of South America, Africa, Asia, or the Middle East. Most world history courses in the US focus on European world history. So if you think of it that way, "someone" decided that should be the focus over all else.

    But I understand. More than anything, if you're teaching your son how to learn and to like to learn, he'll pick up what he needs, even when his formal schooling is over.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  6. #5

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    We are working through World History with Hakims Story of Science series (and BYL8).... I like how it integrates literature along with the Smithsonian book on World History (Smithsonian is more like reference book than text). And a bunch of ancillary math topic books (Including some text and info heavy picture books, they double as social studies or science for my little).
    (We also recently read The Sand Reckoner, a novel about Archimedes, which I was sure Id hate but ended up I appropriated the book for the day because I couldnt put it down.)
    BYL supplements aside, though, I have some doubts about Hakimís.... ethnocentricity? (and secularism *gasp*) That might just be me, though... and if you want to stealth history knowledge into a science mind, this might be just the thing. It does appear to be all about the science and scientists (as long as theyre Europeans at least.)
    The booklist and coordination of supplements might be worth spending a little for the BYL pdf, too.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by alexsmom View Post
    BYL supplements aside, though, I have some doubts about Hakim’s.... ethnocentricity? (and secularism *gasp*) That might just be me, though... and if you want to stealth history knowledge into a science mind, this might be just the thing. It does appear to be all about the science and scientists (as long as theyre Europeans at least.)
    The booklist and coordination of supplements might be worth spending a little for the BYL pdf, too.
    I haven't read the Science volumes, but I think it is probably hard to get even-handed world history content from any one source because everyone marinates in their own culture and even if they don't mean for it to come out (and maybe don't realize they have one) a bias tends to come out.

    As far as Hakim and being secular, yeah, I can detect a mild bias towards faith in the US books, but nothing that is excessive enough to worry me too much, so far, and honestly given how divorced from (any) culture my son is, it is probably not a terrible thing for him to realize that a lot of people in the US believe in a religion. He knows his father does, but he really doesn't understand the need, I think.

    In the Science books, is it very pronounced and how does it manifest?

  8. #7

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    World History/Geography suggestions?
    Its subtle in the Science book Im reading, too. I remember it from History of US, though Id still recommend that as an American History.
    I was under the impression that the Archaic and Classical Greek philosophers were polytheistic if at all, but she consistently refers to them as a singular “God”. This first quote is taken from Plato. Note also the proliferation of churchy illustrations.
    919F5C1E-125A-43AD-9AEC-4B0510E4CE43.jpeg

    C3D0BA86-5DEB-4649-9F11-D4A062816FB4.jpeg

    And references the xtian church affiliations whenever she can.
    Ancient Greek dude here rationalized that we live in heliocentric system, she mentions Copernicus’s affiliation.
    BADECF95-B441-464A-8748-73E25214D1D5.jpeg

    Also this week, I read where she had written something about a scientist like “and he lived hundreds of years before Christ”. (It wasnt “Christ our Savior”, and Im sure that she was trying to avoid phrase fatigue or every other euphamism for describing before our counting of years started moving forwards.)

    And the ethnocentrism of, for example, giving all the credit to the Greeks, when its clear that earlier civilizations had a good grasp on the concept as well (Egyptian Pyramids predate Euclid by about three millenia, I think they had some knowledge of geometry and mechanics!)

    In the Student Quest Workbook, a page is devoted to early inventions, and other regions are mentioned, but nowhere in the book (yet, at least), are they mentioned. (Im personally dubious about the legitimacy of many Chinese claims to have “done it first” (Peking Man, anyone?), but surely there are histories on the subject there that could at least be incorporated into a sidebar?)

    92640F21-A1B7-4C4C-801D-525AD720E7AF.jpeg

    As a spine, though, its probably about as good as it will get.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  9. #8

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    World History/Geography suggestions?
    There are a fair number of supplements we use, too. Short term books I tend to return to our charter as soon as we are done with them, and the spines I purchased on my own (Other than Hakim).
    Attachment 5177
    The science (Kingfisher) and history (Smithsonian) spines would probably be beneficial, but Ive yet to find a book on the BYL list that hasnt been worthwhile.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  10. #9

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    I think it's important to be clear that Hakim's science series is a history of Western science. If she left out Christianity's influence on science, it would have been an extremely deficient history. Christianity has been the hinderer and driver alternately of Western science until the last century or so.

    A science series with that stuff... questionable. A history of science series? I don't know how you leave any of those upside down examples out.

    I do find it disingenuous that her series is a history of Western science but calls itself a history of "science." It's absolutely, unapologetically Eurocentric. Her History of US is very balanced in regards to dealing with non-White history, but the framing of the series is clearly around white colonization and expansion. But every single history of the US is. So I'm not sure if you can get around it there. I found her treatment of First Nations peoples, slavery, immigration, and other "controversial" issues to be more than fair, especially for the intended age.
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  11. #10

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    As to the original question... Do you just want a basic World History textbook? I think Prentice Hall has the best basic ones on the market. Get a vintage World History: Patterns of Civilization or World History: Connections to Today. K12's Human Journey is also okay. None of these are... as talkative or easy to read as Hakim though.

    DK has a big, adult level History book that's like an encyclopedia. It could be a spine. Not really narrative and no questions though.

    I think you're out of luck in terms of something to just read through though. Unless you'd like to pick some specific topics. Like, it's okay to read something else. You want to read Guns, Germs, Steel and Collapse and spend a year on ancient civ and big history, then do it. You want to read a pile of history graphic novels like Persepolis, Maus, Boxers & Saints, etc. and call that a year? Have at it. You want to dive into the history of a specific place and read a well-written narrative history book? Again, go for it. You don't have to play by "the rules" with history. Do what you like.
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World History/Geography suggestions?