Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1

    Default And jumping on the science post bandwagon...

    We are currently working through RSO Bio2 with my 13 yr. old. Originally I was going to beef it up to make it a high school level class, but things happened, and that hasn't worked out. He's currently taking Algebra 1 through Derek Owens, and doing fine with it. He is definitely interested in a possible STEM major, although the type changes with the day and his mood.
    He enjoys science, but is not as...hyper-focused on it as my older son, so self-pacing/learning isn't as feasible for him (older DS self-studied most all of his science, including AP, and is now doing DE).

    He likes Bio more than the other sciences, but doesn't want to do another year of Bio next year--maybe in a few years. He doesn't enjoy physics at all. DE is definitely in the picture later for him as well. That said, he needs 3 years of lab science, and while DE will count, he can't do that until he is 16 (they are strict about that).
    ETA-he will be required to complete a lab science in Bio, chem, and physics.

    I was looking at chemistry. I need a rigorous chemistry with a strong lab component. I looked at WTM, but my goodness, they are expensive this year. And separating the lab into 2 semesters makes it challenging to schedule. That said-chemistry is not my strong suit-especially the math, so I am not comfortable teaching it. I could probably bribe/pay my older one to help me grade the work, but since the younger one is not as intrinsically motivated in the physical sciences, I wonder how long that would last.

    My older one took Chemistry through Johns Hopkins, and while it was heavy on the math, the lab component was seriously lacking. And it's just as expensive as WTM (if not more, I haven't looked lately).

    I don't think he's ready for AP science yet. *sigh* I really do long for a secular science co-op, but that's not going to happen around here. I couldn't even get anyone to commit to working through RSO Bio with us this year.

  2. Ratings Request Leaderboard
  3. #2

    Default

    If you're going to do a traditional sequence, and he's happy with Derek Owens this year... I'd do Derek Owens physics next year and get it out of the way. It's algebra based, so there's your lab. It's better to do it before chemistry. Most chem options are intended for slightly older students anyway. And then chemistry before bio since bio has so much biochem now. He doesn't like it, so get it out of the way before AP time if that's where he's headed.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

  4. #3

    Default

    Farrar, I'm curious. With Derek Owens being an online class, how do the labs work? Are they hands-on or virtual?
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  5. #4

    Default

    That does make sense, and gives me more time to figure out the chemistry issue. Then he could do bio as a dual enrollment, and maybe a&p as well(if he’s still thinking about the public health/epidemiologist route).

  6. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    Farrar, I'm curious. With Derek Owens being an online class, how do the labs work? Are they hands-on or virtual?
    I don't know because we haven't done it, but I thought there were virtual labs and then the math. As I understand it, a lot of applied "hands on" element with physics is the math. If I'm misremembering, though, a family could easily add a ten labs from a book and call it done. This is one of those things that I've started to realize some people overthink.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

  7. #6

    Default

    If a student is applying to engineering and/or the sciences, many colleges won't accept virtual labs. And in physics, math is simply its "language"--what one needs to find answers and make conclusions. They can be part of a lab, but do not constitute a lab.

    Physics labs are just as hands on as any other science lab. Motion study, pendulums, electric circuits, lenses and mirrors for optics, heat flow, liquids for fluid study, etc. What can make it easier these days are apps that let you record video of what is happening in the lab and makes it easier to make graphs to interpret. But the student is still doing the lab, manipulating the equipment.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  8. #7

    Default

    I looked again because it's one of the physics options we're considering for next year. The labs aren't virtual. You get the supplies yourself. There are ten of them apparently.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
And jumping on the science post bandwagon...