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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    I can't answer for Luv2HS, but I use an older edition of Giancoli's text to save money, like this one here.

    Also for answers and solutions, try Slader.com. Input the ISBN of the textbook you have.

    In general, high school science texts can be overwhelming. Never expect to complete a book within an academic year. Most teachers have to decide what to keep and what to cut. For example, when I taught out of Giancoli's text, I was only able to teach two-thirds of the material within a school year. Keep that in mind!

    Oh, boy, I don't recall them skipping material in HS science, but that was so long ago. Maybe I would not have noticed it. That is going to be interesting. Editing out content that is not obviously unnecessary is not my forte.

  2. T4L In Forum Oct19
  3. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by HobbitinaHobbitHole View Post
    Oh, boy, I don't recall them skipping material in HS science, but that was so long ago. Maybe I would not have noticed it. That is going to be interesting. Editing out content that is not obviously unnecessary is not my forte.
    Here are some tips that might help.

    Biology: my kids skipped any chapters having to do with human anatomy, as they had a separate health class. If a student wants to study botany, or oceanography, separately, skip those chapters and save them for the more specific study.

    Chemistry and Physics: Look at a typical high school's course description. Here's one for physics from our local public high school:

    PHYSICS 1 Prerequisites: Biology I; Algebra I; Geometry. Content: Topics will include: problem solving, motion and forces, energy and work, momentum and collisions, simple harmonics, principles of waves, and simple circuits. Interpretation of natural phenomena through observation experimentation, and scientific methods.

    Notice that it does NOT include heat, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, special relativity, properties of the atom, or nuclear physics.

    Another approach is to cover the basics, then let the student decide what topics to cover to fill out the year.

    Hope this helps!
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

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  4. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    I can't answer for Luv2HS, but I use an older edition of Giancoli's text to save money, like this one here.

    Also for answers and solutions, try Slader.com. Input the ISBN of the textbook you have.

    In general, high school science texts can be overwhelming. Never expect to complete a book within an academic year. Most teachers have to decide what to keep and what to cut. For example, when I taught out of Giancoli's text, I was only able to teach two-thirds of the material within a school year. Keep that in mind!
    I thought Giancoli was a college text. We use some college texts, but decided against that one, although a lot of people like it. I think you are right though- It is a 2 semester college text that could equal 2 years of high school material. I did pick up Physics Principles and Problems at a HPB yesterday, and it is very visual and is easy to line up with the Georgia Public Physics Fundamentals lectures. I'm not going to look for the TE materials since we in the last 10 weeks of physics.Dd just really wanted a book. I can't say if it's strictly algebra-based though. It doesn't seem to have any calc.

  5. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    Here are some tips that might help.

    Biology: my kids skipped any chapters having to do with human anatomy, as they had a separate health class. If a student wants to study botany, or oceanography, separately, skip those chapters and save them for the more specific study.

    Chemistry and Physics: Look at a typical high school's course description. Here's one for physics from our local public high school:

    PHYSICS 1 Prerequisites: Biology I; Algebra I; Geometry. Content: Topics will include: problem solving, motion and forces, energy and work, momentum and collisions, simple harmonics, principles of waves, and simple circuits. Interpretation of natural phenomena through observation experimentation, and scientific methods.

    Notice that it does NOT include heat, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, special relativity, properties of the atom, or nuclear physics.

    Another approach is to cover the basics, then let the student decide what topics to cover to fill out the year.

    Hope this helps!


    Ok - So it is not so much a HS text but a 101 and 102 Physics college text? I should be able to manage editing that. I can just look at the AP standards and then add the additional things he likes or I can pick a state scope of sequence and add.

    Thanks!

  6. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ella Darcy View Post
    We probably should have went with Derek Owens, but decided to try Centripetal instead. That was something of a disaster. We hopped over to GPB until I could find something else and just stayed there. The GPB materials are good, with answers and such, and pretty good video labs. Definitely worth $20. Some cons; no solutions, just answers. Videos are super cheesy, but the math teaching is good. It is not calc based, but does use a fair amount of trig.

    ETA: The Holt book I was talking about is the Biology book (sorry- I thought that was what you mentioned). I do have the Holt Physics book coming through ILL that I ordered before I found the Glencoe Principles and Problems. I'll post how they line up when I get it. Since the GPB was filmed in 1996, anything I get will be a newer edition.
    Drat to the trig. I knew I had discarded it as a strong possibility... that must have been why. I want an algebra based one, but not beyond that. I played with enrolling them in Clover Creek, but dang that enrollment went fast! Derek Owens it is then! I actually think it's not a bad deal for what you're getting.
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