Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 35
  1. #1
    Senior Member Enlightened
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    132
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default Rigorous or A's?

    We can choose to do AP classes where he's likely to get a B or higher but he'll be more prepared for a 4-yr school or a program that is less rigorous that I know he'll walk away with A's.

    I'd like him to go with the more rigorous program, isnt that the point, but the high GPA of the less rigorous program attracts me. Its 4.3+ is average for the college he want the gpa get into. I don't want him to fail out either. I could also go the more rigorous way for Science, English and Math and the less rigorous way for electives and SS. He goes to Community College 2017 and is completing a 75cr. Degree before graduating. I would like if he found Community College easy as his degree is 14-17 cr. a semester and As would boost his GPA greatly. I need to plan for next year. My hope is for him to have at least a 3.75 before graduating. So I really really need to decide by Mid-may. Itll affect where he takes his summer classes.

    Would you make it easier so the GPA is better?
    Rigorous so community college was easier and hope his GPA reflects that?
    DS- 17 12 grade Dual enrollment, and 1 co-op.

  2. Thank You Leaderboard
  3. #2

    Default

    What is your son's opinion?
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  4. #3

    Default

    Imma defer to inmom (and others who have the high school experience), but isnt GPA a bit irrelevant when hes taking the classes at community college?
    History he takes there will be what he takes instead of at the college, same with sciences and math?
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  5. #4

    Default

    I guess I'm confused at to your approach. Will he be taking courses like English, Chemistry, Biology, History, College Algebra or Calculus while completing his Associate Degree? If so, then AP is irrelevant. AP is to earn credit for college courses the student has not taken yet. AP is completed in high school.

    For example, my son took chemistry, physics, calculus, and English for dual credit. So he did NOT do an AP class or take an AP test for those subjects (since he already had college credit for them). However, he took Computer Science AP class and exam, since what he wanted was not offered as dual credit locally.

    Also, if motivated enough, a student can "self-study" for an AP test w/o taking an AP course. You just can't list the course as an AP course, but you can certainly put the score on his transcript.

    I DO generally advise that you involve your son in the decision making process, at least to some extant. For example, "You'll need biology, chemistry, and physics. Which science would you like to take this year?" Let him feel he has ownership of his education as well.
    Last edited by inmom; 04-28-2016 at 06:56 PM. Reason: clarification
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  6. #5

    Default

    Also, it seems like you/he already has a 4 yr college picked out. Each college treats AP scores and classes from other colleges/universities differently. If you haven't already, both of you should look into whether they accept either AP scores and/or credit from where your son will be earning his Associate's.

    Secondly, have some other 4 yr colleges in mind, just in case, when it's time for your son to aply. It's not uncommon for students to have a dream school but not be accepted there (my son, for example). Choose schools that also have good programs in your son's chosen field but maybe aren't quite as "elite" or expensive, depending on your family's needs.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  7. #6
    Senior Member Enlightened
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    132
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default

    Hes currently doing FLVS after doing T4L: high school in middle school. So the AP courses are accredited through the state. So they show up on his transcript as AP. Now I can have him re-do T4L and get easy A,essentially doing it twice just for the credit or I can have him take 3 APs and pre-calc next year. Weve always just done whatever the next step after he completes that level. The next step now would be AP because hes already completed the classes at high-school level. Currently hes re-doing classes he took in T4L just to get use to the system and get some grades in. Now his grades are Cs and Bs because he didnt care to try. As we speak he has As in his two current classes.

    If he does the AP courses and gets a three or higher he'll go into 11th with 10-20 credits. If he goes into 11th grade with those credits then he wont have to do Summer semesters in college to finish his AA upon his Senior year of high school. So he can go into bioengineering as a Junior after finishing homeschooling.

    He'd rather do the AP courses because I wont pay him for the time4learning courses. He said hed rather get good grades in college then in high school. Im still not sold about not having him re-do classes for easy As.

    Weve looked at all the state schools that have biomedical engineering. My kid wants to make cyborgs . He has five to look at and choose from. All of them accept AP and are 2+2 colleges (will accept him as a jr. if he takes the right classes and gets an AA in high school). The one he really wants us UF. Id rather UGCF,or USF. Its going to come down to GPA (why I'm stressing), program acceptance and his financial aid package.
    Last edited by Miguel'smom; 04-28-2016 at 08:48 PM.
    DS- 17 12 grade Dual enrollment, and 1 co-op.

  8. #7

    Default

    Miguel'sMom, You said yourself that you are "stressing". I would suggest taking a step back, reassessing the true cause of the stress. Sometimes the way to be the most helpful to our kids is to get our stress under control so that we can think more clearly. I say this as a fellow hsing parent, and with the kindest intent. I hope you take it that way.

    Feel free to PM me if you need to talk.
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  9. #8

    Default

    Is there an advisor through FLVS that can help you plan a path for him? Or an admissions councillor for the colleges that can give you more specific information about the courses he needs to take, for a bio-engineering degree?

    I am concerned that you have him lined up to take so many AP classes, and the motivating factor for him is that you pay him to do well. AP classes ask a lot of young students. You have mentioned before that he didn't do well taking one AP before. What has changed that makes you believe taking 3 or 4 now will be ok? Does he want to take the AP classes because he is motivated, or because he wants the money?

  10. #9
    Senior Member Enlightened
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    132
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default

    Is there an advisor through FLVS that can help you plan a path for him? I'm not sure
    admissions councillor for the colleges that can give you more specific information about the courses he needs to take, for a bio-engineering degree? The local community college says I'm on my own as far as advising because he's a home-school student even at duel enrollment time.

    You have mentioned before that he didn't do well taking one AP before. It's not that he didn't do well it's that he was mean and unmotivated.

    What has changed that makes you believe taking 3 or 4 now will be ok? He's a year older and I have no idea what to do with him he's run out of classes.

    Does he want to take the AP classes because he is motivated, or because he wants the money? He's motivated for the money. If money wasn't involved he'd still be getting C's. I don't mind paying him he spends more then 30-40 hrs per class.

    This is the problem with counting courses not hours.
    Last edited by Miguel'smom; 04-28-2016 at 10:39 PM.
    DS- 17 12 grade Dual enrollment, and 1 co-op.

  11. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Miguel'smom View Post
    It's not that he didn't do well it's that he was mean and unmotivated.

    He's motivated for the money. If money wasn't involved he'd still be getting C's. I don't mind paying him he spends more then 30-40 hrs per class.
    These two statements are rather alarming. I am speaking with my college professor hat on instead the one of a homeschooling parent.

    I have seen my share of students whose parents got them to college through these methods and I have had students with these attitudes. It never, ever goes well. It sounds like the he needs quite a bit more maturity and drive to complete these classes that you have laid out for him. In fact, he should be planning his schedule at this point and if he can't or does not have the motivation, he is not ready. It is that simple.

    No amount of parent desire can get kids through college classes, because in the end the kids are not required, by law, to go to college. They choose to be there. Or at least are making that choice based on their parents influence, either way, it is a choice.

    While I realize this sounds harsh, I am telling you as many parents do not see what happens in the college classroom. Parents get their kids there, thinking it is a continuation of high school but it is not high school, as I occasionally have to remind my students. As a college instructor, I do not remind students constantly about homework, I do not send reminders about missing work. Motivated college students are able to organize their time, are able to plan, and know that if they are having trouble, to come and talk with the professor, even if the class is boring and uninspiring.

    So I would encourage you to consider his abilities in connection with his maturity. Since he is so young and has so much time before traditional college age, let him create a schedule, with your guidance, have him plan out the next year and see how it goes. If it doesn't go well, there is still time to get him back on track for high school. You have lots of time to consider high school. It might help you too.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
Rigorous or A's?