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  1. #1

    Default Rough Day Interesting Comment

    My son was having a BAD day recently. I think because our week has been out of sorts due to an event happening this weekend. Anyhow, he's had a lot of TV & outside playtime with his sister. No playdates, no friends, no schooling. Not our normal routine.

    My son is his own person, not mainstream (hence the reason we are homeschooling, he doesn't fit the box very well) He hasn't been given a formal label for his quirky behaviors, because he doesn't seem to fit in any of those label boxes either.

    Well my father in law (my son's grandfather) had old friends/company visiting that wanted to see the grandchildren, so I sent the kids over for a visit. I stayed home. The next day I ran into my FIL's company. The woman and I talked for a long while (about an hour) and in the middle of that conversation somewhere she mentioned she enjoyed seeing my children. And that my son never stopped, he was so active and all over the place and never sat still. Did I think he was dyslexic?

    Is that an odd comment? Is busy a charateristic of dylexia? My husband suffered as a child from dylexia, so it's very possible, but had never heard busy/active associated with it. This woman is a retired taecher who at one point or another has taught all grade levels. So maybe she knows something I don't??? I'm not a proud mother, but rather a mother that would prefer to know sooner then later if my child has any special needs.
    DS - 7 - An active, senstive & brilliantly clever negotiator
    DD - 5 - A drama princess who wears her heels & tiara to collect rocks in the mud.

    2011-2012 GOALS = to not stress out my children or our family with the learning/teaching process...to teach the love of learning...to enjoy my children to the fullest so when they fly the coop, I don't look back with regrets.

  2. T4L In Forum Oct19
  3. #2

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    I don't know anything about special needs! But my son is 7 and he is all over the place and never stops either. My Dad calls it 'essence of boy' I would think that if you have concerns about your son's reading, that is one thing. Being active, that's another. But anyway, Sorry about a rough day and a comment that has got you second guessing yourself.

  4. #3

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    Maybe she got her "terms" messed up and meant hyper-active!

  5. #4
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
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    My son has dyslexia and he was definitely shall we say..."active"...growing up, but I never felt like the two were necessarily connected. I've read some books on dyslexia, though, that make a strong connection between hyperactivity and dyslexia. I've read others, however, that never even mention activity level. I CAN say that the constant movement of my kiddo was never something I sought out help for. We were homeschooling....what did it matter if he needed to get his groove on?? It was the reading/writing issues that caused us to start researching dyslexia.


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    Senior Member Arrived Teri's Avatar
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    My daughter has dyslexia and it is not a trait that she has at all. The boys in her dyslexia class at Scottish Rite, though, were all dual diagnosed with dyslexia and ADHD. So you can have both, but having one does not necessarily mean that you have both.

    Could the two thoughts maybe not have been connected? Did you ask her what made her think of dyslexia? Like, did she have him read to her?
    Teri
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    Senior Member Arrived dbmamaz's Avatar
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    yes, thats what I was wondering - she commented on his activity level and then also wanted to mention something about dyslexia. perhaps she thought he was so bright he should be reading by now?
    Cara, homeschooling one
    Raven, ds 10, all around intense kid
    Orion, floundering recent graduate
    22 yo dd, not at home
    Inactive blog at longsummer

  8. #7

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    I'm not so sure of the cause/effect relationship here. I can tell you that with our active 5-year-old, I have slight concerns about dyslexia, but they're more than likely just typical things that kids who are just learning to read and write do. His main thing is reversing number order, as in writing "21" when he means "12." That's fairly common with him. As I said, I'm not stressed about it, but if it's this way in a couple years, then I'll know something's up. Still, I'd hesitate to call the two connected, but I have nothing to base that on other than my general caution and skepticism.
    Dad (39) to 2 DSs Hurricane (aka Nathan, 11) and Tornado (aka Trevor, 7)
    He likes to think he knows what he's doing. Please don't burst his bubble by telling him otherwise...

  9. #8

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    Maybe she meant to say ADHD.

    My son has dyslexia and ADHD and he was pretty busy when he was younger.

    As an aside, dyslexia can cause quirky behavior--particularly dyslexia combined with giftedness. It is frequently mistaken for Asperger's.
    Kai

  10. #9

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    Yeah that's an odd comment in my mind, too. I wouldn't necessarily relate one to another. I used to tutor a dyslexic girl, and she was definitely not hyperactive. My son *is* hyper (ADHD) and has tracking issues related to an eye issue he had when he was younger, but he's not dyslexic. Odd comment.
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    Sarah B., Oklahoma

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  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Topsy View Post
    My son has dyslexia and he was definitely shall we say..."active"...growing up, but I never felt like the two were necessarily connected. I've read some books on dyslexia, though, that make a strong connection between hyperactivity and dyslexia. I've read others, however, that never even mention activity level. I CAN say that the constant movement of my kiddo was never something I sought out help for. We were homeschooling....what did it matter if he needed to get his groove on?? It was the reading/writing issues that caused us to start researching dyslexia.
    We are homeschooling, so like you it makes no difference to me if he wants to bounce off the walls, in fact he seems to 'get' his lessons when he's able to move about. His dad had dyslexia as a child...so it really wouldn't suprise me if one day we found out our son also was dyslexic.

    Quote Originally Posted by Teri View Post
    Could the two thoughts maybe not have been connected? Did you ask her what made her think of dyslexia? Like, did she have him read to her?
    I think they were connected, because she continued on about his level of busy after questioning me about dyslexia...the question was directly in the middle of her observation of his activity levels.

    Quote Originally Posted by dbmamaz View Post
    yes, thats what I was wondering - she commented on his activity level and then also wanted to mention something about dyslexia. perhaps she thought he was so bright he should be reading by now?
    He can read...but she may or may not know that...I highly doubt she asked him to read to her.

    Quote Originally Posted by EKS View Post
    Maybe she meant to say ADHD.

    My son has dyslexia and ADHD and he was pretty busy when he was younger.

    As an aside, dyslexia can cause quirky behavior--particularly dyslexia combined with giftedness. It is frequently mistaken for Asperger's.
    Our family doctor thinks gifted and bored. Dyslexia is a strong possiblity because his dad is. Gifted is possible because I was. (I say was, because I dumbed myself down in high school, not sure if the 'gift' is still around or if I'm just plain old quirky! hee, hee) I did take him to be tested for Asperger's when he was almost 4 and they told me he didn't have enough traits to be on the spectrum. So who knows....maybe we'll find out gifted and dyslexic???

    As for now, I just wondered if activity levels and dyslexia were related...because it seemed like an odd statement/question coming from someone who has met my children 2 times in their lives for less then an hour each time.
    Last edited by Lou; 06-12-2011 at 10:45 PM.
    DS - 7 - An active, senstive & brilliantly clever negotiator
    DD - 5 - A drama princess who wears her heels & tiara to collect rocks in the mud.

    2011-2012 GOALS = to not stress out my children or our family with the learning/teaching process...to teach the love of learning...to enjoy my children to the fullest so when they fly the coop, I don't look back with regrets.

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Rough Day Interesting Comment