Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25
  1. #1

    Default Dyslexia question

    We're pretty sure that Jay has dyslexia. Actually, both kids show signs. Jay's symptoms are much more pronounced, though. The funny thing is, neither one has any problems with reading or comprehension. Anyway, my sis & her fiance work part time for a dyslexia center. So, we were talking to her fiance today & he is going to get me some of the training materials they use for training tutors. That way, I can see if it is something that we can implement here at home or not. If not, we'd have to drive to another city 2x a week. We figure implementing it at home would be ideal. It would be a natural part of his day & schooling. We could also use the techniques with Dea to help her. Plus, we wouldn't have to pay for fuel to drive to & from another city twice a week.

    My question is this, does anyone here have personal experience with the Orton Gillingham Approach? I'm just wondering how difficult it would be to implement at home. I'll find out within a week or so, when he brings me the training materials. I just thought I'd see if anyone could share any personal experiences using it with their kids.

    Also, how much did it help with areas other than reading - spelling, writing, math?

  2. Ratings Request Leaderboard
  3. #2

    Default

    So curious to hear more about this topic...and maybe some ideas on HOW TO TEACH the dyslexia child...I'm not 'exactly sure' of the detailed "SIGNS" but my hubby suffered dearly for his dyslexia as a child in school. And I have been wondering lately if our son is showing some signs and if there are better ways to teach dyslexic children, etc...
    DS - 7 - An active, senstive & brilliantly clever negotiator
    DD - 5 - A drama princess who wears her heels & tiara to collect rocks in the mud.

    2011-2012 GOALS = to not stress out my children or our family with the learning/teaching process...to teach the love of learning...to enjoy my children to the fullest so when they fly the coop, I don't look back with regrets.

  4. #3

    Default

    My 13 yr old has dyslexia. He learnt to read rather slowly, not becoming fluent until 8. Once he became reasonably good at it he took off and I figured problem solved.

    Not so much.

    At 13 his spelling is pretty behind.

    We use All About Spelling, which is O-G based, to remediate spelling. It teaches EXPLICIT phonics. It should also help his reading.

    When his dyslexia was discovered, by accident as part of a neuro psych eval at age 10, he read at the 9th gr level but spelled at 2nd gr level.

    Dyslexia is a problem of sequencing. For this reason things like long division can really throw kids. They mix up the sequence of the steps.

    Obviously he has coped very very well with reading strategies on his own. Its been interesting. Not rushing into algebra for obvious reasons.

  5. #4

    Default

    What is O-G based?
    Where would one start if they wanted to have their child evaluated for dyslexia?
    DS - 7 - An active, senstive & brilliantly clever negotiator
    DD - 5 - A drama princess who wears her heels & tiara to collect rocks in the mud.

    2011-2012 GOALS = to not stress out my children or our family with the learning/teaching process...to teach the love of learning...to enjoy my children to the fullest so when they fly the coop, I don't look back with regrets.

  6. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sarahb1976 View Post
    My 13 yr old has dyslexia. He learnt to read rather slowly, not becoming fluent until 8. Once he became reasonably good at it he took off and I figured problem solved.

    Not so much.

    At 13 his spelling is pretty behind.

    We use All About Spelling, which is O-G based, to remediate spelling. It teaches EXPLICIT phonics. It should also help his reading.

    When his dyslexia was discovered, by accident as part of a neuro psych eval at age 10, he read at the 9th gr level but spelled at 2nd gr level.

    Dyslexia is a problem of sequencing. For this reason things like long division can really throw kids. They mix up the sequence of the steps.

    Obviously he has coped very very well with reading strategies on his own. Its been interesting. Not rushing into algebra for obvious reasons.
    We stopped using Spelling programs years ago. Dea would do great on all the Spelling assignments & ace the test. However, using those same words in her writing was another story. So, I stopped using program, because they just didn't work. We started doing a word-a-day thing. I give one word each day. It is her spelling & vocabulary word. She has to look it up in the dictionary, learn the definition, part of speech, origin/root, and use it as much as possible in writing and conversations that day. It has helped, we've seen improvement in her spelling. I'll try AAS with Jay & maybe with Dea, too.
    Both kids read quite well, when reading to themselves. Reading aloud is different, though. They struggle with words I know they know & stumble a lot. I'm the same way, so didn't give it much thought in the beginning. I hate reading aloud because I have to slow down so much to do it. They both have problems with spelling and writing. Jay is having problems with Math now, too. He knows the correct answer (he says all the problems out loud as he does them, so I hear him say the right answer), but writes them down backwards. He'll say "8 times 3 is 24," but he'll write 42 instead of 24. This becomes more of a problem when he's doing multi-digit problems, because he'll end up carrying the wrong digit. He doesn't do it all the time, but he's starting to do it more often.
    Dh has dyslexia, so we've been watching for signs of it. Dh had to learn to deal with it on his own, and we wanted to make sure that we knew if the kids had it, so we could help. I'm not sure if Dea has mild Dyslexia or if her problems are due to her ADHD & Bipolar. I figure, even if it isn't mild dyslexia, the methods to help dyslexics should still help her. I'm certain Jay has Dyslexia, though.

  7. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by m2wandc View Post
    What is O-G based?
    Where would one start if they wanted to have their child evaluated for dyslexia?
    Orton Gillingham. It's the multi-sensory method used to help dyslexics. To have your child evaluated for dyslexia, you need to take him to a child psychologist.

  8. #7

    Default

    DH had sever dyslexia as a kid and I'm guessing our son is a strong canidate as well. He is EXTREMELY bright and understands complex concepts, yet he doesn't fit into any box and he is perplexing to me when I try to figure out WHY/WHERE he's coming from at times. Like mentioned above, he understands complex math but when writing the answer at least 50% of the time it's backwards. The school he used to go to said it's normal for 5 year olds, and we were told to wait until he's 8 or so to know for sure. But gees that's 3 years of frustration for him if he is dyslexic...I'd rather be teaching him in a way that is HELPFUL to his confidence rather then HURTFUL. KWIM? He reads really well, but again when writing his words (writing is our HARDEST CHALLENGE of our school day) he will write letters backwards and sometimes upside down.

    Once at the library the librarian asked him to draw a picture and she would hang it on the window...so he did, she told him to put his name on it, he wrote his name backwards (so if you held it to a mirror you could read it properly) and I asked him why he did that since he can write his name correctly and he said, because she told him she was hanging it on the window and he wanted to make sure the people on the outside of the window could read it....not sure if that's clear logic, but you can see where his mind was...
    DS - 7 - An active, senstive & brilliantly clever negotiator
    DD - 5 - A drama princess who wears her heels & tiara to collect rocks in the mud.

    2011-2012 GOALS = to not stress out my children or our family with the learning/teaching process...to teach the love of learning...to enjoy my children to the fullest so when they fly the coop, I don't look back with regrets.

  9. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Busygoddess View Post
    Orton Gillingham. It's the multi-sensory method used to help dyslexics. To have your child evaluated for dyslexia, you need to take him to a child psychologist.
    Thanks...I think I'll look into it a bit
    DS - 7 - An active, senstive & brilliantly clever negotiator
    DD - 5 - A drama princess who wears her heels & tiara to collect rocks in the mud.

    2011-2012 GOALS = to not stress out my children or our family with the learning/teaching process...to teach the love of learning...to enjoy my children to the fullest so when they fly the coop, I don't look back with regrets.

  10. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by m2wandc View Post
    DH had sever dyslexia as a kid and I'm guessing our son is a strong canidate as well. He is EXTREMELY bright and understands complex concepts, yet he doesn't fit into any box and he is perplexing to me when I try to figure out WHY/WHERE he's coming from at times. Like mentioned above, he understands complex math but when writing the answer at least 50% of the time it's backwards. The school he used to go to said it's normal for 5 year olds, and we were told to wait until he's 8 or so to know for sure. But gees that's 3 years of frustration for him if he is dyslexic...I'd rather be teaching him in a way that is HELPFUL to his confidence rather then HURTFUL. KWIM? He reads really well, but again when writing his words (writing is our HARDEST CHALLENGE of our school day) he will write letters backwards and sometimes upside down.

    Once at the library the librarian asked him to draw a picture and she would hang it on the window...so he did, she told him to put his name on it, he wrote his name backwards (so if you held it to a mirror you could read it properly) and I asked him why he did that since he can write his name correctly and he said, because she told him she was hanging it on the window and he wanted to make sure the people on the outside of the window could read it....not sure if that's clear logic, but you can see where his mind was...
    Yeah, my son also writes letters backwards & forms them strange (he starts & ends in unusual places, instead of the way you normally write them). Whenever he writes anything, I have to remind him "z faces the other way sweetie" or " your j is backward," etc. He even writes capital 'D' backwards sometimes. He does it with his numbers, too. I'll be looking over his work & have to remind him that 3 or 7 faces the other way or ask "is that a 2 or a 6?"

    If the training materials I get aren't enough, I'll actually be signing up for training through the center. That way, I can work with Jay here at home, instead of taking him to sessions twice a week. I'm already working with both kids on dealing with & controlling their ADHD and working with Dea on dealing with her Bipolar & controlling her emotions. So, adding in working with Dyslexia should be fairly simple.

  11. #10

    Default

    2, 3, 4, 5, 7.....a, b, d, g, p, q, s...are the most commonly flipped numbers & letters for my son.

    If he starts a word towards the end of the paper, he will melt when he realizes he doesn't have enough room for his word.

    If I say something about a number being backwards, he acts as though he feels shame (not sure if he was corrected in a negative way at school?) so at times I won't point it out blantantly, but rather I'll show him praise for those that are facing the correct way or write MY answer next to his with the numbers/letters going the correct way to see if he notices, which most of the time he does notice and then he'll want to fix it. I'm just wondering if it's something you outgrow or something you have to work on your whole life? I'll have to ask my hubby more about his experience with it.
    DS - 7 - An active, senstive & brilliantly clever negotiator
    DD - 5 - A drama princess who wears her heels & tiara to collect rocks in the mud.

    2011-2012 GOALS = to not stress out my children or our family with the learning/teaching process...to teach the love of learning...to enjoy my children to the fullest so when they fly the coop, I don't look back with regrets.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
Dyslexia question