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  1. #1

    Default Nervous about homeschooling

    Not exactly sure where to post this. I have been researching homeschooling for a while. Looking into it all and the plan has been to start over the summer and into the next school year, however as it gets closer I am worried. Am I capable of teaching my kids or will I end up failing them and robbing them of an education? How do you deal with these fears? I am about to give up on the entire idea because I am so worried that I will leave them with huge learning gaps or they will be significantly behind their peers if they decide they want to return to PS. a lot of the issues that were pushing me towards HS in the first place have been resolving and I am left wondering if it is worth it, although through looking into it more I was looking forward to having more time with them at home as opposed to being tied to the school's schedule and them being so tired after being at school all day they hardly want to do anything else. Idk, kind of a rant I guess.

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  3. #2

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    Hi Kittey, These are feelings all of us have or have had. I worried all the way through homeschooling high school! (Admittedly, if worrying was a sport, I'd earn a gold medal!!).

    First, I will make two general statements. First, assuming their basic needs are met, almost all kids learn in spite of themselves. Kids are simply inquisitive.

    Second, who says YOU have to teach them everything. There are outside classes, library events, workshops at parks,co-ops, tutors, online classes (not entire curricula, but an interesting one or two).

    As one who is done homeschooling and whose kids have turned out fine, let me tell you that YOU CAN DO THIS if you really want to. The amount of flexibility it gave our family was amazing. (Addressing your not wanting to be tied to the school's schedule). We/they were able to go on spontaneous field trips, travel once in a while when dh went on a business trip (best over was Wash DC for a week!!), volunteer at the National Park, job shadow, etc. They were able to get a good night's rest since they weren't getting up at 5:30 to shower and catch the school bus. Their diet was better than when eating packed or school lunches. They learned life skills being home all day.

    And educationally, it gave us flexibility in determining what and how they learn.

    I may have missed a post elsewhere, but how old are your kids?
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University graduate: BS in Computer Science, minor in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by kittey1994 View Post
    Am I capable of teaching my kids or will I end up failing them and robbing them of an education?

    How do you deal with these fears?

    although through looking into it more I was looking forward to having more time with them at home as opposed to being tied to the school's schedule and them being so tired after being at school all day they hardly want to do anything else.
    To address these three things:
    1) Are you capable? You do not need to worry about being able to teach them. All you have to do is keep an open mind and be willing and capable to provide them with resources and learning opportunities, to learn with them and help them through the things you both don't understand, and to outsource some subjects or look at return to school if you do it for a while and decide it is really not working.

    2) How I deal with the fear. Doing lots of planning and making sure we have lots of resources on hand to cover all sorts of bases. Making sure I give my kids lots of rich learning opportunities and things they cannot experience in school (time to volunteer, time to learn social skills with non-age peers etc.), so even if they do have gaps in some areas later on, I know they have more in some areas that public school kids don't.

    3) If you want to spend time with your kids and are tired of the school schedule, do it for that reason alone. You are not going to get to the point of your children being young adults and leaving home and go "oh well, I really regret those X years that I spent homeschooling them" but you could very well go "I really regret not homeschooling them". Even if you just aim to do it for 1 year to have some time to get closer to them, it is worth it.
    NZ homeschoolers (school year runs start Feb to mid Dec).
    DD 12 (year 7) and DD 7 (year 2).
    Fourth year homeschooling.
    Part-time freelance science copyeditor.

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Nervous about homeschooling