Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1

    Default If you knew your daughter was going to school in a years time

    What would you concentrate on teaching/doing with her this year ? She is 11, turning 12 mid-year.

    I already know she needs to do a lot of math catch-up. We also need to work on her sleep schedule so that she can wake up in time to get to school. What else ?

  2. Ratings Request Leaderboard
  3. #2

    Default

    Well, in addition to making sure she's caught up in all subjects, I'd get her used to tests. She'll need to take tests in public school, so making sure she has some experience may help prevent test anxiety. I would make sure she has got experience with a variety of test questions - mutiple choice, T/F, essay, short answer, etc. I would focus on study skills, note taking, and test taking skills. I would also spend some time on organizational & time management skills, to make sure she can keep her schoolwork organized & use her time efficiently (so she still has time for a life after school and homework). For my dd, I would also have to work on making sure she was able to sit still, be quiet, and not interrupt the teacher.

    These are just some general ideas. Hope they help.

  4. #3

    Default

    Time management, definitely. This is something I always have to remind my kids about. And unfortunately tests are going to be a fact of life, so the sooner she gets used to the nature of the beast (if she isn't already) the better.
    Dad (39) to 2 DSs Hurricane (aka Nathan, 11) and Tornado (aka Trevor, 7)
    He likes to think he knows what he's doing. Please don't burst his bubble by telling him otherwise...

  5. #4
    Senior Member Arrived
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    2,010

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MelissainOz View Post
    What would you concentrate on teaching/doing with her this year ? She is 11, turning 12 mid-year.

    I already know she needs to do a lot of math catch-up. We also need to work on her sleep schedule so that she can wake up in time to get to school. What else ?
    Wow, this thread could have been started by me-my daughter just turned 12 and wants to go back to public school next year, so I'm wondering if I'm doing the right things to align her with the public school curriculum. And the sleep schedule is going to be a really big deal for her-she is not a morning person at all!
    Just call me Shoe...
    Previously homeschooled our son and daughter (both now in university)

  6. #5

    Default

    I don't know what the curriculum is like is Australia, but here in the US, I wouldn't worry about aligning to the curriculum other than in math - and even then, only to a certain extent. For things like writing, history, and science, then it's the improvement of skills and the building of knowledge that matters most instead of a certain sequence. If kids are focused on a certain type of writing or a certain history or science subject, then just because you did something different shouldn't matter too much assuming a child can apply knowledge and learn new skills. If anything, if you feel the schools are too focused on something it may make sense to do the opposite so the kid gets exposure to it. For example, if I knew my kids were about to go to school, I absolutely wouldn't do any US history because American schools do tons of US history at every level. I would focus on world history instead.

    But yeah, math and general organization skills would be what I would focus on.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

  7. #6
    Senior Member Arrived
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    2,010

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by farrarwilliams View Post
    I don't know what the curriculum is like is Australia, but here in the US, I wouldn't worry about aligning to the curriculum other than in math - and even then, only to a certain extent. For things like writing, history, and science, then it's the improvement of skills and the building of knowledge that matters most instead of a certain sequence. If kids are focused on a certain type of writing or a certain history or science subject, then just because you did something different shouldn't matter too much assuming a child can apply knowledge and learn new skills. If anything, if you feel the schools are too focused on something it may make sense to do the opposite so the kid gets exposure to it. For example, if I knew my kids were about to go to school, I absolutely wouldn't do any US history because American schools do tons of US history at every level. I would focus on world history instead.

    But yeah, math and general organization skills would be what I would focus on.
    You make some good points, and it gives me a bit of relief, since I am not really following the order of the public school curriculum this year, except in math.
    Just call me Shoe...
    Previously homeschooled our son and daughter (both now in university)

  8. #7
    Senior Member Arrived Teri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    1,819
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    For us, I would be working on the TEKS skills that the state has on the level that she would be for this year.
    Teri
    Joseph (5/00), Libby (10/01), Caroline (9/02) and Alex (4/89)
    My Blog

  9. #8

    Default

    One more thought... when I was teaching, we got a few kids who were entering school after being homeschooled for many years. Most of them were slightly behind in math and good at creative writing, but not so much at analytical writing, though they could catch up easily. In the US, at least, there's no national curriculum and mobility is such that kids often have different skill and knowledge sets and teachers are prepared to deal with and accept it - so former homeschoolers having a different skill set is usually okay (the exception I think is really math, where kids have to be able to keep up with the level in which they're placed and that means having similar knowledge to everyone else in the class upon which to build) assuming they can be organized and keep up. For those former homeschooled kids, there was always this month or so where we were constantly having to tell them to do really basic things, like change classes, or go with the group or things like that.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

  10. #9

    Default

    Corrigan, you're right. And if mood swings are anything to go by - yes, she needs her adolescent sleep. I think we'll ignore sleep until the next lot of summer holidays (11 months away ) and do a sleep boot camp then...

    Tests - why didn't I think of tests ? Oh God, this year is going to be fun...not. I hate tests. Why is my daughter doing this to me ? And why can't I be the kind of mother who just says no ?

    So - maths, tests, writing skills, time management, explaining to her how to act like a "normal" student, sleep adjustments 6 weeks before - anything else ?

    You know, now I'm actually thinking about the things that need to be thought about, I feel quite sad - and even worse - unable to join in random conversation. I don't want her to go.

  11. #10

    Default

    I think she'll do OK with the mechanics of the school day. She is used to hanging out at dance and taking instruction from teachers, doing exams, talking to friends, moving from class to class.

    We will all find homework difficult.

    Shoe, hope it all works out with your dd and that she changes her mind!!! That's what I'm hoping for here but it isn't likely

    Dd wants to go for the social aspect. I feel so disappointed that homeschooling couldn't provide that for her.
    Last edited by Stella M; 01-16-2011 at 06:14 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
If you knew your daughter was going to school in a years time