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  1. #21

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    Both the Ms are currently wait-listed at a charter that offers a project-based education. Neither of them wants to go to school, but M1's tantrums over schoolwork were wearing me down. So during our winter break I entered the lottery pool for enrollment.

    Then I switched out our math to a worktext (Math Mammoth), and added back the Mosdos workbook, and made other changes that made his school work much more structured. I did it to ensure he had the necessary skills to stay afloat in school, but he's stopped fighting me on a daily basis. We go over new concepts and work the new processes together, and his LA work is still pretty intensive for me, but he's doing a lot of work on his own, without struggling, and then moving on to whatever is floating his boat.

    So we'll see. I was a lot like this at his age. I wanted clear guidelines and expectations, I wanted to get the job done, then get back to whatever I wanted to do. So homeschooling is looking more sustainable than it did, even if it's looking less like I thought it would.

    Both of the Ms attend an outdoor school program one day a week, so they each have a solo day at home.
    FKA Hordemama
    Stay-at-home-librarian parenting a horde of two sons: Marauder 1 (M1) born in 2007, and Marauder 2 (M2) born in 2012.

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  3. #22
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling Librarian View Post
    Both the Ms are currently wait-listed at a charter that offers a project-based education. Neither of them wants to go to school, but M1's tantrums over schoolwork were wearing me down. So during our winter break I entered the lottery pool for enrollment.

    Then I switched out our math to a worktext (Math Mammoth), and added back the Mosdos workbook, and made other changes that made his school work much more structured. I did it to ensure he had the necessary skills to stay afloat in school, but he's stopped fighting me on a daily basis. We go over new concepts and work the new processes together, and his LA work is still pretty intensive for me, but he's doing a lot of work on his own, without struggling, and then moving on to whatever is floating his boat.

    So we'll see. I was a lot like this at his age. I wanted clear guidelines and expectations, I wanted to get the job done, then get back to whatever I wanted to do. So homeschooling is looking more sustainable than it did, even if it's looking less like I thought it would.

    Both of the Ms attend an outdoor school program one day a week, so they each have a solo day at home.
    You've done SO much accomodation to find what works for them. HUGE kudos. It's a non-ending challenge, isn't it? As soon as you zig, they've already zagged and you can feel like you are starting over again at ground zero much of the time. But what an incredibly cool thing to be able to give your kids a truly customized education, eh? I LOVE the idea of an outdoor school program - - especially since it gives you a one-on-one with each kiddo once a week. What a boon!


  4. #23

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    Aw, thanks, Topsy.

    The outdoor school is fantastic. They both love it, and M2 is very much a homebody, so that's saying something! And I like having one-on-one time with them.
    FKA Hordemama
    Stay-at-home-librarian parenting a horde of two sons: Marauder 1 (M1) born in 2007, and Marauder 2 (M2) born in 2012.

  5. #24

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    My kindergartener still goes to speech at school once a week. A few weeks ago my 6th grader went with us, and as we were walking in she said she never wanted to come back, it reminded her of a kid jail. So, guess we are in for the long haul! I have 5 kids, 4 of them went to PS for at least a year, and none of them want to go back. I am expecting #6 (it was an accident!), and my oldest is starting High School next fall- believe me I've thought about throwing in the towel nxt year, but all the kids and DH are on board with homeschooling, so hoping it goes well!
    Mom to 5 great kids~

  6. #25
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Free Thinker View Post
    so hoping it goes well!
    Just determine to make your definition of "well" as having fun learning together, and you can't miss!!!


  7. #26

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    Yes, for our oldest, DD12, and believe it or not, because of the "S" word! If we lived an hour to the south, we'd have all kinds of opportunities for her socially, academically, etc. But we don't, and an hour's drive away may as well be on Pluto for us, because trekking 4 kids, including a toddler, who can't eat food unless I packed it first, for the whole day, when the toddler is a very very bad traveler? No.

    So DD12 has had a rough time lately, because of one thing and another, we barely saw friends all winter.

    And both she and DS9 have recently experienced a bit of a brush-off from ps friends that sort of helped them get by with not seeing hs friends enough: for DD, the other girl is a freshman in high school, and spends all her time either doing homework, texting, or being on social media, and usually doesn't "have time" for DD even though they used to be quite close. As for DS9, the 5th grader he was friends with, had some problems hanging with a rough crowd, and recently started giving DS9 the cold shoulder on the phone, so that friendship may be over, not that I'm entirely sorry, as that kid wasn't a great influence on DS9.

    But I have wondered how to go about finding friends again. I've BTDT on this over the years, and it's a LOT of work in our area. The world is your oyster in the southern part of our state, but not so much, here, and the few friends we've made and kept, are wonderful, but again, none of them live close enough that seeing each other often enough, ever works out, particularly in winter...and seeing enough of friends only during the summer isn't enough.

    On the other hand, our schools in this town are among the worst in the state. Not exactly a tempting choice. But there is a charter school that focuses on the arts, that DD could apply for in a couple of years, for 9th grade, that at least gives us something to hope for.

    In the mean time, she's going to try volunteering at the library, shelving books. Better than nothing. And if it isn't enough, if she wants to go for it, even though we both know our local junior high stinks, she can go try that out, too. I don't expect it to be pleasant, but at least she'll get an experience.

    Hoping the library volunteering will help us move in a better direction though, and that going to the local crappy school isn't going to be necessary.
    Last edited by crunchynerd; 03-12-2017 at 10:21 PM.
    Middle-aged mom of 4 kids spanning a 10-year age range, homeschooling since 2009, and a public school mom also, since 2017.

  8. #27

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    Well, the school we were eyeing does not have a spot for DD for the fall, so we are back in HS mode. I think both DD and I were simultaneously disappointed and excited. We moved past disappointed pretty quickly. I asked her what she'd like to focus on in the coming year, we made a list, and now we are making adjustments to our HS work to accommodate her interests. That has revved up her interest again, and feels like a fresh start.

    To kick of the "more science" request, we spent 13 hours (13 freaking hours, OMG) doing science last weekend! We had really dropped the ball on our RSO Life and Earth/Space - it is always the thing that gets skipped if we run short on time. So in 13 hours, we finished both those courses, and started the RSO chemistry. (So much of those courses were things DD already knows, she watches so many science videos....) So far, chemistry seems to be a bit more meaty than the prior two, so that is satisfying DD. We are both stoked about making science the centerpiece, versus the cast-off in our newly reorganized HS efforts.
    Working mom homeschooling DD (10) who is working on a 4th-6th grade level and keeps me hopping! SimpleMoney is my new venture. www.simplemoneypro.com

  9. #28

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    Hope to update after DD12 shadows a 7th grade student (soon!) but am pretty much preparing for her to enter public school, one way or another, and not because I don't feel we can do a good enough job academically, but because her social life has been leaving (one moving, another going to public school, etc) such that if she were to hate the shadowing experience and want not to go to school this fall, we'd have a tough time figuring out where to get her a social life, then.

    Plus, she is competitive and thrives when she is in a group situation where she can test her mettle. Homeschooling doesn't cater to that as easily.

    She has my complete support whatever we end up doing. This is about what is best for her at any given point in time, and she's bright, but she's not the kind of weird that runs in my family; she's more the kind of normal that runs in her father's family, and is an extrovert, and all that. I felt alone in a crowd at school. Hoping she won't, but think she has a good chance of thriving there.

    One thing I really worry about is her sleep requirements, and how slowly she gets moving. She takes after my mother in being a "long sleeper" and sending her to bed at 9 last night wasn't even enough to get her up before 9 this morning. I don't know how she will make it if she has to be at school at 7:15, when she can't be in bed by 7, reasonably. But I guess we can only try it and see what happens, realizing that it's not an irreversible decision either way. Maybe the external pressure and challenge will invigorate her?

    I worry that I didn't push her enough in reading, all this time...she is fine at it, but she didn't do what her father and I did, reading adult scifi by choice by the time we were 11. She has actually read very few entire books. I am actually having to insist on her reading some, now.

    But that is probably just me finding something to worry about. Small potatoes in the grand scheme.

    We'll see what happens after she spends a day in the life of a 7th grader, week after next.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starkspack View Post
    We're in this boat. A few weeks ago, DD declared that she might be interested to "try school." Felt like a gut-punch, if I'm honest.
    I SO remember that gut-punch feeling when my son wanted to try school in middle school. It ended up only being one year because he got so frustrated with the school-i-ness of everything, but nevertheless, it was painful and unexpected at the time.


  11. #30
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    Everything seems to be changing in all sorts of ways here. I had hoped that DS would be 4 or 5 days a week at the school where he's been doing a Friday program, but instead, we're moving back to California next month. I've started talking to another school up there. They're an expeditionary academy, so loads of outdoor time and experiential learning. Only minor hiccup is DH was pretty shocked at the price and I think would prefer that he just went to the local PS, but I said I'd rather h/s him. I did say that I'll look into upping my hours to full-time to help pay for it.

    My weird question is that I feel like I need to find some things to compensate myself. I spend a fair amount of time on homeschooling groups, listening to h/s podcasts, reading stuff about homeschooling. I supposed that I will still have a general interest in education etc, but I do feel like I'm at a bit of a potential loose end losing that part of my identity. Anyone else felt that?

    Elly
    4th year of homeschooling DS, now 9!

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