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  1. #21
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    I'd ask the school what the timeline is for testing. If you request it early they might be able to hustle it through. But sometimes getting tested takes for.ev.er. In that case you might want to go it on your own.

    If I wanted to get a new kid tested I had to first wait out the first quarter to get enough scores to prove they were failing, begin paperwork to track them, meet with parents and MTSS treat in the second quarter to review why we were tracking, track for a minimum of three months, reconvene with the team and parents, usually now in quarter three to prove that gains were not being made at the same level as peers, then begin district paperwork for testing, which might happen by the end of the year. By that time we were in 4th quarter and I'd have to meet again with the team (and later parents) to discuss possible retention. We didn't retain kids with an IEP because that allows for accommodations (like extra time for tests) and modifications to curriculum (actual changes to the curriculum 5 spelling words instead of 20, for example that I did for a kid that had memory loss).

    Now if a kid wasn't failing it was even harder to get testing pushed through.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  2. T4L In Forum Oct19
  3. #22

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    But a parent should be able to request testing no matter what. ( or at least in my state.) I had a friend who kept requesting her sons to get tested and the school had to accomedate her. (Her sons did not have a LD.)
    ~*~*Marta, mom to 5 boys.
    DS 1 ( 19, has his associates' degree and is off to college)
    DS 2 (17 and dual enrollment in college)
    Keegan (15 and enrolled in a PPP but still has home classes)
    Sully (10 years, 4th grade)
    Finn, (9 years, 3rd grade)

  4. #23
    Senior Member Arrived ejsmom's Avatar
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    I used a private educational psychologist. I did not feel our school district would have the resources to adequately test what all needed to be tested, and I did not think they would have the wide knowledge of what is available in a broad geographic area as far as therapies. I wanted someone to test who did not have anything to gain from my kid not showing any issues. I also made sure to use an educational psychologist who only did testing, so there was no financial incentive to find issues, either.

    DS was tested years and years ago through a school when were thinking about putting him into PS for K. It was an excellent school district. They did not do as thorough job of testing as the privately hired educational psychologist performed. I think the choice is yours, but I would find out what the school will test for first. Will they test to rule out dyscalculia? They cannot diagnose ADD/ADHD. I believe there are laws (check in your state) about what they are required to test for and it should not cost you anything. But it may not be all the evaluations you need to figure out why she is struggling.
    homeschooling one DS, age 13.

  5. #24
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkelf View Post
    But a parent should be able to request testing no matter what. ( or at least in my state.) I had a friend who kept requesting her sons to get tested and the school had to accomedate her. (Her sons did not have a LD.)
    Yes request. Depending on resources and the attitude of you administration that could mean a lot of things - or not much at all. We were basically instructed that a parent request for testing meant to start the above process. It didn't make things go any quicker. That's just the timeline we were working on no matter what the circumstances.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  6. #25
    Senior Member Arrived ejsmom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TFZ View Post
    Yes request. Depending on resources and the attitude of you administration that could mean a lot of things - or not much at all. We were basically instructed that a parent request for testing meant to start the above process. It didn't make things go any quicker. That's just the timeline we were working on no matter what the circumstances.
    I agree TFZ. All this stuff takes time and patience. Even testing privately it took about 3 weeks to get an appointment from my initial call, and then 6 weeks for the results to be analyzed and a formal plan of suggestions for accommodations written up by the psychologist. I thought it took us most of the summer. And then we ended spending most of the fall on therapies. IEP meetings are usually a back and forth of observations and testing, as well, that take a few weeks. These processes are generally time consuming.
    homeschooling one DS, age 13.

  7. #26

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    Wow, so much information, thank you.

  8. #27
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    I hope we aren't bumming you out!
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  9. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by TFZ View Post
    I hope we aren't bumming you out!
    Quite the opposite, I'm very glad I created this thread even though I feel I've been half incoherent. I feel much, much better about certain things thanks to the responses on the thread.

    I don't feel great about absolutely everything, though. I still want to homeschool. I'm torn between just 100% supporting my daughter in what she says she wants (to go to public school) and trying to convince her to choose homeschool again.

    I admit I'm the one who brought the hammer down. And things really weren't working. But I would love to try again - do school at the library (we did that on Friday and I thought it went great, though I admit that was just one day), have DH do "field-trip Wednesdays" to get her out of the house and have fun and stimulating activities (museums, hikes, kayaking, building circuit boards, science experiments).

    DD wants to go to school because she wants to spend more time with other kids and because she wants a more stimulating, full day. I understand those reasons and I think they are important. She has a friend who goes to the same school and is in her grade, so they might be in the same class together, and certainly can eat lunch together and hang out at recess together. The school is newly renovated and is a beautiful space, everything new, lots of windows, modern classroom setup. I can easily imagine her blossoming there.

    On the other hand, I really liked homeschooling and I think there are some things I can do really well with her in terms of one-on-one education. I also fear some of the bad parts of mass socialization.

    I'm not even considering "making" her homeschool, only wondering if I should even talk to her again about it and trying to stress the good parts of homeschooling and bad parts of public schooling more. When I talked of public school, I just talked about the good parts. I never even thought she would decide, solidly, that she wants to do it. But I sure wouldn't want to deny her public school if indeed that is what she needs. So I'm just torn. DH really wants her to stay homeschooled.

  10. #29
    Senior Member Arrived Avalon's Avatar
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    I would also like to chime in with the suggestion for testing. My dd is dyscalculic, and I have found Ronit Bird's website helpful for explaining number sense. My daughter's main issues are "number sense," learning steps for how to do a task, and a bit of working memory, but not really bad. The number sense thing comes up ALL the time. If I ask her how long something took, she can't tell me. If I ask her how many students are in her musical theatre group, she can't tell me.

    I recall taking a lot of breaks from math over the years. She would get very discouraged and math took up all our energy and didn't leave energy left for other things. I decided that she needed to focus on her strengths and spend time doing things that help her thrive. When we did math, I expanded out to other math-related topics. Her major problem is quantities and calculations, but it turns out that she's pretty good at geometry, trigonometry, algebra, and now linear equations & functions. She needs extra time to learn and remember the steps for each thing, but she totally understands that stuff and can usually solve word problems if she's able to draw a diagram.

    She is 16 now and we're finding that the learning comes more easily now. She's had enough practice learning new things that she picks things up faster now. Maybe I'm better at knowing what will work and won't work for her. She pretty much only wants me to teach her math topics, which is a problem because my energy is flagging at this point, but I feel encouraged that she can really do this stuff. Her average in her Grade 10 math course is over 80%.

    You can figure this out! In school or out, your daughter is going to have to figure out some strategies for learning math. Don't let it be the ONLY subject she gets to do.

  11. #30

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    Some info on laws and testing. I have had 24 annual IEPs, two initial testings, and 9 triennial evaluations. I have been doing this for awhile. I am currently homeschooling though a public charter in CA so same laws apply.

    A request by a parent for initial testing has a timeline. It is 60 days unless your state laws make it shorter. Make your request in writing. There is no way around this for the school, regardless of attitude. This is the law.

    If your child is in public school and has a disability, it is the schools job to assess, create learning goals, and work on acheiving them.

    Most parents have tons of questions about services they can get through their school districts but let's start at the beginning. Below is the law. It comes from IDEA - the Individual with Disabilities Education Act, and regardless of being at a public school or being a homeschooler, you are entitled to assistance. A child in public school will get more, a child who is not in public school is still entitled but won't receive as many services.

    First things first. The law. Make your request right away, in writing. There is no way around it. The law is below.

    "Under 34 CFR §300.301(c)(1), an initial evaluation must be conducted within 60 days of receiving parental consent for the evaluation or, if the State establishes a timeframe within which the evaluation must be conducted, within that timeframe. The IDEA 60-day timeline applies only to the initial evaluation. Public agencies are not required to make the eligibility determination, obtain parental consent for the initial provision of special education and related services, conduct the initial meeting of the IEP Team to develop the child’s IEP, or initially provide special education and related services to a child with a disability during the IDEA 60-day initial evaluation timeline."

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