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  1. #1

    Default Letters question

    First of all I'm not sure if I'm in the right forum, so forgive me if this is in the wrong place.

    We've been going over the alphabet with two different sources, the main Calvert Kindergarten curriculum and with two work books (Disney School Skills and Kumon). Calvert covers uppercase and lowercase at the same time, they go in alphabetical order, while the workbooks have two separate books for uppercase and lowercase, and go in order according to how the lines are in the letter (both workbooks have the same order). Now my question is should I follow what the workbooks seem to encourage and do uppercase then lowercase, or both at the same time.
    So far I've been focusing more on uppercase letters while still touching on the lowercase. And we've been fine with the mixed order. There's a good bit of the Calvert workbook that we'll be coming back to later after we cover it in the other two workbooks.
    Calvert gives no real instruction on how to write the letters in the workbook and no practice, you trace it once then write it on your own.

    When teaching letters did you focus on uppercase then lowercase, or both at the same time?
    Teemie - 11 years old, 6th grade with an ecclectic mix

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    Senior Member Arrived Teri's Avatar
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    My kids all learned to print when they were toddlers and too young to really give "instruction", so I started with cursive. Sorry, no help here.
    Teri
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  4. #3

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    Personally I would stick to upper case first, simply because the letters are easier to form. Then introduce lower case. Most programs will start with letters like L, E, F, H, T, first, then in in slants K, M, N, V, W, Z, A, then the bubble letters, B, D, P, R, then the more complicated, U, C, S, etc.

    If your child is having no trouble at all with making small circles, or loops, curvy lines, slanted lines, etc. Then you could put them all together.

    I always print off extra work, or start copy work soon after the basic shapes are learned.
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  5. #4

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    When my daughter was in kindergarten and 1/2 of first grade in PS, they covered Upper and then Lower case letters in writing. I found that she was rather confused after doing lower case and I think it would have been better to do both together. We're having to teach her what case to use as she gravitates towards using uppercase when she gets confused, even in the middle of a word. We've not touched on proper case for all words, just proper nouns and are having her practice words in just lowercase. We've just started 2nd grade.

    Hope this helps!
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  6. #5

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    DS insisted on learning his letters a few months before he turned 2. We showed him upper and lower case together and there was never any confusion. Sorry I can't be of much help, but it makes sense to me to do both at once.
    Mama to one son (12)

  7. #6

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    I think lower case are super-important. Read this. What do you see? Mostly lower case letters. When you read a book with kids and are encouraging them to "read" along, they see mostly lower case. But we always concentrate on the upper case letters. I've made it a priority to teach lower case letters. I made my own letter matching cards for upper and lower case (match the lower to upper case). Now, my little guy just doesn't' feel like writing though I try to all it "drawing" the letter. Maybe one day he'll care to make the effort. But in general I am focusing more on lower case since that what he, and me and you see most often.
    Kris
    Home schooled one year using Calvert, public school family currently, planning for our next adventure
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  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by SunshineKris View Post
    I think lower case are super-important. Read this. What do you see? Mostly lower case letters. When you read a book with kids and are encouraging them to "read" along, they see mostly lower case. But we always concentrate on the upper case letters. I've made it a priority to teach lower case letters. I made my own letter matching cards for upper and lower case (match the lower to upper case). Now, my little guy just doesn't' feel like writing though I try to all it "drawing" the letter. Maybe one day he'll care to make the effort. But in general I am focusing more on lower case since that what he, and me and you see most often.
    I love the matching game idea!!
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  9. #8

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    Thanks all for the feedback. My instinct was to do them at the same time, but the Kumon books seem to be set up for uppercase first then lowercase, and after asking a few people I was just even more confused.
    We did a version of that matching game today. I read about a game where you write upper and lowercase letters with sidewalk chalk on the ground. You stand on one letter and say it then the other person runs to the matching letter. We already have letter cards so I might do a matching game with those though.
    I think I'll do more review with lowercase letters now though with flash cards. I haven't been using those as much as the uppercase ones. The game should be an easy fun way to implement a review though.
    Teemie - 11 years old, 6th grade with an ecclectic mix

    Blog : Tumblr : Instagram : Facebook
    http://jessicamckelvin.com

  10. #9

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    It depends on if you're talking about letter recognition or writing the letters. If you're talking letter recognition, I always did both at the same time, playing fun games with letter cards (memory, matching, etc.). When it comes to writing, though, it's different. They usually teach writing capital first, because they're easier to write. As Jana pointed out, the capital letters are generally taught in a specific order - easiest to hardest. Lower case letters are taught later, when the child's fine motor skills are more developed.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Busygoddess View Post
    It depends on if you're talking about letter recognition or writing the letters. If you're talking letter recognition, I always did both at the same time, playing fun games with letter cards (memory, matching, etc.). When it comes to writing, though, it's different. They usually teach writing capital first, because they're easier to write. As Jana pointed out, the capital letters are generally taught in a specific order - easiest to hardest. Lower case letters are taught later, when the child's fine motor skills are more developed.
    Thanks for your help, Calvert is presenting them both at the same time (kind of writing and recognition). I've been covering both but doing more focus on the writing for the capital letters. I think she needs more practice just in recognition for both and she's been doing some letter review with Star Fall and they cover both upper and lowercase. I'll still hold off on the lowercase workbook though, and just focus on the recognition.
    Teemie - 11 years old, 6th grade with an ecclectic mix

    Blog : Tumblr : Instagram : Facebook
    http://jessicamckelvin.com

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Letters question