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  1. #11
    Senior Member Enlightened Soulhammer's Avatar
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    Completely co-sign the Unschooling Handbook.

    I read Lorraine Curry's Easy Homeschooling after WTM and realized that HSing could be really simple. She's not secular, so you'd have to skip over some of the religious stuff.

    I used lots of online sources to figure out what I was doing, but got a lot out of Sonlight's book lists (again, not secular).

    I also got lots out of Parenting Beyond Belief in terms of figuring out how to approach talking about my secular/humanist beliefs with my son in an intentional way.

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  3. #12
    Senior Member Arrived Elly's Avatar
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    Hmm, tricky. I'd say:
    1. Project Based Homeschooling
    2. The Well Trained Mind
    3. The Charlotte Mason one from Penny Gardiner

    I think they give a good overview of different options. I second many of the ones above.

    Honestly, I always say to people to see what their library has and start there. I think that you can see from that what might be worth your while buying immediately to go into in more detail (I mean, if classical makes you want to run screaming, I wouldn't bother buying TWTM, or ditto for unschooling). I've gradually started accumulating a wider selection of books over the past few years, but some were more chance acquisitions when I found them cheaper (or was given them).

    Elly
    4th year of homeschooling DS, now 9!

  4. #13

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    For me, Teach Your Own by John Holt is my go to when I am having a "feel like banging my head" day. I have gone to it more than once after the initial reading.

    When I started, The Well Trained Mind by Susan Wise-Bauer really, really helped my mind form a general plan. It is in a different spirit than Teach Your Own. It might be overwhelming to some--in fact I know people that hate it. However, for me it gave me peace of mind that no matter what my kids might want to learn as the years went on, we had resources on "how to". I still keep it as a reference book. I haven't followed her suggestions exactly, but I still think it's useful.

    And, even though, we are not religious at all, I loved these two: Homestyle Teaching and Home Grown Kids both by Raymond and Dorothy Moore. There isn't too much religion in either, but, I do recall that I had to give someone a heads up.

  5. #14

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    I've read a bunch of homeschooling books - it's rather like a hobby, I'd say. However, the ones I think I liked and/or got the most out of were:

    Well-Trained Mind: I would echo other sentiments here - we don't follow it, but it was eye-opening, and in a perfect world, I would teach more of the classical curriculum. A related book is "The Core" by Leah Bortins. I got a good bit out of that one, too.

    Free-Range Learning: Chock full of ideas. I'm due to re-read this one.

    How To Homeschool- A Practical Approach, by Gayle Graham: Totally religious, but I read it probably 3 times. It has great ideas and charts for organizing your homeschool day/life. I can't say that we are following anything exactly that she provides, but I found this to be super helpful and inspiring when I was starting out and needed some ideas of where to begin.
    Working mom homeschooling DD (10) who is working on a 4th-6th grade level and keeps me hopping! SimpleMoney is my new venture. www.simplemoneypro.com

  6. #15

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    soulhammer....love Parenting Beyond Belief. not homeschooling but definitely exception worthy

    Lots of Well Trained Mind hmmmm? Are we all such gluttons for punishment? JK! I bought this book early on, gave it away cause it was making me crazy, then bought it again, then gave it away AGAIN! Next time I'll just check it out of the library. It is a good resource, to be sure, but I feel like it taunts me when it sits on my shelf at home

    Some of you put only two....how can you do that? But thanks, now I can cheat with an extra!

    Teenage Liberation Handbook; Grace Llewellyn Just picked it up again with my oldest starting 9th this fall. Forgot about all of the great resources and ideas after part one!
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  7. #16

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    Place-Based Education, Connecting Classrooms and Communities (David Sobel).

    Anything Alfie Kohn. He used to come across as anti-homeschool, but he's really just a public school optimist and idealist.

    Cherry-picking blogs. With homeschooling BOOKS, I inevitably end up throwing them against the wall with a, "GAH! Bullshit!" Even Project-Based Homeschooling (which we do) - it's just so... sanitized. I need the dirty truths that speak to my own experiences. Blogs are good for that.

  8. #17
    Senior Member Enlightened Soulhammer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by muddylilly View Post
    soulhammer....love Parenting Beyond Belief. not homeschooling but definitely exception worthy
    PBB really helped me to come to terms with being secular in a subculture (certain pockets of homeschoolers in the South) that is aggressively evangelical, so reading it was the making of our homeschool when I was feeling pretty lonely and prone to ranting post-park-day.

    The real goodies in terms of picking sources to talk about science/ethics etc. is probably the follow-up, Raising Freethinkers, which would be fourth on my list. Here's a link to recommended sources from the book for anyone interested:
    Raising Freethinkers Resources Guide Part 1 ę SCIENCE-BASED PARENTING

    In a literature-based homeschool like ours, you could probably build a secular curriculum (barring math, of course) based on what's there.
    Last edited by Soulhammer; 06-13-2015 at 07:27 AM.

  9. #18

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    Soulhammer...just put McGowan's second book on my wish list, but hesitant. Is it a whole lot different than PBB? I already have the first one and I'm wondering if the other is worth it. That link you've posted looks great BTW
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  10. #19
    Senior Member Enlightened Soulhammer's Avatar
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    PBB is conceptual/philosophical while Freethinkers is practical. I bet your library has it.

  11. #20

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    I am finishing up this book and it is changing my worldview of education. I already had this perspective, but he has the research to back the unschooling philosophy. Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life by Peter Gray


    On another note, would anyone be interested in creating a book club? I would love to read and discuss some of these books.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 12-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

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