Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11

    Default

    Just an FYI, they never returned my email answering my questions. So. That takes them off the list.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 12-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  2. Thank You Leaderboard
  3. #12

    Default

    I ordered a subscription for a Tinker box last week. I kept reading "You can cancel at any time" so I felt alright about signing up and paying for the one year subscription. After subscribing, I read some more and saw that I can only cancel after the initial one year tem is over .
    homeschooled 4th through 8th grade - currently in public high school 10th grade
    Dumplett (girl - age 15) and Wombat (boy - age 15)

  4. #13

    Default

    The boxes still seem expensive, but i gotta say I love getting their weekly-ish free project emails. This week was a sundial experiment (you label where the shadow is every hour), melted crayon suncatchers, and changing grapes to raisins.
    How fun is that!
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  5. #14

    Default

    I know someone who subscribed for a little while. Most of the projects seem the type of things you see on Pinterest - nothing new or different. Nothing that would be that hard to put together yourself if you took the time. It seemed expensive for what it was.
    Dorothy
    Back home after three years!!
    Steph - college Graduate!!!
    George - 8/2005
    Vicki - 7/2007
    Dottie's Homeschool Universe

  6. #15

    Default

    Perhaps it is expensive for what it is. The enewsletter is free, though, and gives the directions you dont get on pinterest (I think).
    They all are activities both my 4 and 10yo would like doing. I thought Id share.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  7. #16

    Default

    We rec'd the Tinker Crate for one year - and have several that have never been opened. I think they would be best for younger children - maybe age 8 or 9 (their suggested age was 9-16; mine were 11). My children completed the main project in minutes and were excited with the finished project, then it was never touched again. Maybe it was too laid out/prepackaged. They were more like assembly projects. The instructions were very easy to understand and they needed no assistance - that was nice. My children had no interest in delving deeper into the topics, but other children may take it a step further so it would be a better learning experience and better value. I intended to sit down with them and take it a step further; but never did.
    I thought they would get excited to receive them; but they didn't.
    All that said, they did enjoy the short time it took to build the items.

    I had no trouble cancelling my subscription at the end of the year.

    The emails sound great - but I didn't receive them.

    p.s. I just asked my kids for their reviews:
    Son - "They were fun but it would be better to receive them quarterly instead of monthly."
    Daughter - "They were interesting but I didn't feel like doing them often."
    homeschooled 4th through 8th grade - currently in public high school 10th grade
    Dumplett (girl - age 15) and Wombat (boy - age 15)

  8. #17

    Default

    Thanks for the feedback alexsmom. I see thatKiwi/Tinker Crates also has a YouTube channel, which has ideas. I signed up for the e-newsletter to see what ideas they have, that's a good idea.

    I think we will skip purchasing it through. DS wants to do his own thing. I have found the monthly Home Depot projects, as well as the science centers' mini-maker spaces are working out well. And we are using DIY.org projects to round it out.

    Today we went out of town and we were at a science center with a maker space. They handed out to kids a kit with pre-cut cardboard, piece of paper, piece of foil, some straws, small doweling and a couple of popsicle sticks. They had some models of what people made with the kit for ideas (wind-powered car, with a sail), but kids could do what they wanted and ask for more supplies, if needed. We were there for an hour, as DS completely modified the plan and asked for some technical advice. I am wondering if I created these non-kits for him, what would he come up with. Maybe there are too many options when I say, what do you want to do, so maybe some surprise non-kits and see what happens.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 12-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  9. #18

    Default

    I've considered them off and on, but Tech is SO picky! Slime or goo would be a waste as he hates things that gets his hands dirty (he even insists on gloves to paint). I keep looking back at them, but honestly, with only a single child, we could do more expansive, targeted stuff for about the same price, or less. Maybe for multiple kids, or one that wasn't so picky. It seems more geared towards really busy working parents than stay at home parents so maybe I'm just not the target audience. :-)

  10. #19

    Default

    Kiwi Crates - experience with?
    We have now had Tinker crates for about a year (they were offered through the charter.... no out of pocket from me) and Im not overly impressed.
    The little projects are fun, but it takes a serious effort on the parents part to make anything educational out of them.
    Theyre more like a substitute teacher day - here this will keep you guys busy and isnt the regularly scheduled program.
    If youre not there, right on top of it, the kid(s) just make the toy / game and play with it, no learning taking place at all.

    We have two that arrived at the end of the school year which we havent done yet.... here are some pictures. (Its a fiber optic stars set, the learning is about bending light, and some constellations.)
    IMG_2082.JPG

    IMG_2083.JPG

    IMG_2084.JPG
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  11. #20

    Default

    I agree that the tinker crates weren't that great - on the other hand the doodle crates were loved by my kiddos. They are certainly pricey and I only did a 3 month subscription so I didn't need to worry about cancelling etc. We really enjoyed the art projects and it was nice having it all in one box.
    Beth
    DS16 with ASD, DD12 and DS10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
Kiwi Crates - experience with?