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  1. #1

    Default Social Studies Ordering

    Background: I'm in the "suddenly homeschooling" boat, but I've been supplementing forever. I've posted here quite a bit. I've got a 3rd grader and a 1st grader. The 3rd grader is (was) in a full day gifted and talented program and the 1st grader is probably smarter, although they have very different strengths. The e-learning crap is not working for our family, so I've been foraging our own path and have gotten the stamp of approval from their teachers.

    For SS we've been reading the "What is/was ..." series. (My son conveniently go the What is America set for Christmas). So far we've read: "What is the Declaration of Independence", "What was the Boston Tea Party", and "What is the Constitution". When we started the 3rd grader's public school was on the pre-American Revolution. They've been forging ahead and have done Government and started the Civil War this week. The books we have here include:
    "Who was George Washington?
    "Who was Alexander Hamilton?"
    and then closer to the Civil War content:
    "Who was Sojourner Truth?"
    "What was the Underground Railroad?"
    "Who was Abraham Lincoln?"
    "What was the Battle of Gettysburg?"

    Do you think I should stick with finishing up with George Washington and Hamilton, or go ahead and switch to the Civil War? And Should I read all 4 book on the Civil War?

    I'm worried about topic burnout but also about not being thorough enough.
    Thoughts?

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  3. #2

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    My thought is they don't have to learn all of it before the end of the year. If they are interested and wanting more, great, keep going on the path you're on. If they are getting tired of it, back off and change direction if necessary. Burnout is hard to come back from and best avoided if at all possible. This isn't the last time they will be exposed to the information in content subjects. They will see it again in middle school, high school and undergrad classes in college.

  4. #3

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    I would go based on their interests. If George Washington is fascinating, stick with it. If interest has wavered, go on to another topic.
    Dont worry about being “thorough enough” - your goal isnt to prepare your kids for a Jeopardy competition or an AP exam, but to give them the idea that these things happened in our past.

    You might also have them watch Liberty’s Kids for a fun age appropriate overview of the entire revolution.

    As far as e-learning crap, yah, Im with you that its not a good way for littles to learn. Poor teachers are doing the best they can in the situation, being told that learning MUST continue. Poor teachers, poor kids, poor parents trying to make the best of it.

    Enjoy this time taking the reins! Homeschooling is so much better when youre calling the shots about coursework!
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by MapleHillAcademy View Post
    My thought is they don't have to learn all of it before the end of the year. If they are interested and wanting more, great, keep going on the path you're on. If they are getting tired of it, back off and change direction if necessary. Burnout is hard to come back from and best avoided if at all possible. This isn't the last time they will be exposed to the information in content subjects. They will see it again in middle school, high school and undergrad classes in college.

    This is true. We are enjoying reading the books. I read out loud while the kids either clean the playroom or do puzzles. Maybe the best idea is just to ask them.

  6. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alexsmom View Post
    I would go based on their interests. If George Washington is fascinating, stick with it. If interest has wavered, go on to another topic.
    Dont worry about being “thorough enough” - your goal isnt to prepare your kids for a Jeopardy competition or an AP exam, but to give them the idea that these things happened in our past.

    You might also have them watch Liberty’s Kids for a fun age appropriate overview of the entire revolution.

    As far as e-learning crap, yah, Im with you that its not a good way for littles to learn. Poor teachers are doing the best they can in the situation, being told that learning MUST continue. Poor teachers, poor kids, poor parents trying to make the best of it.

    Enjoy this time taking the reins! Homeschooling is so much better when youre calling the shots about coursework!
    Yes, I think I'll just let them pick. Of course they are typical siblings, so I'm sure they will choose differently! I

    Ooooh! I like that Liberty Kid's thing! Thanks for the tip!

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Social Studies Ordering