Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Default History Odyssey?

    There's a Facebook group called "Secular Homeschool Curriculum" that doesn't allow History Odyssey posts at all due to Story of the World use. My understanding is that it's only the Level 1 Ancients that uses parts of SOTW and it's being replaced by a new publication that doesn't use SOTW next month.

    I want to make sure that I'm using secular curriculum, not "faith-neutral." Pandia Press publishes History Odyssey and Real Science Odyssey. I chose both for my curriculum this year (Level 2) and am waiting for their delivery.

    What's the deal with History Odyssey? Is it really secular? Real Science Odyssey is truly secular, correct?

  2. Ratings Request Leaderboard
  3. #2

    Default

    RSO is truly secular, yes. Not neutral or any garbage like that.

    SOTW is problematic, but unfortunately there arent any widely known palatable alternatives to it.
    I havent used History Odyssey, and my discouragement over finding something for my older kid while we were in elementary led me to not even try for my younger son.
    You can do your own unit studies covering each of the civilizations / eras, because its easy enough to find secular materials. I believe HO tries to do the same sort of thing, but they use SOTW as a spine. (I couldnt choke down SOTW, I dont blame anyone else who doesnt want to use it. At the same time, it is offered by our public charter school as a resource, so either they dont really care, or its better than the alternatives.

    Good luck! if you want help finding other history resources, ask!
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  4. #3

    Default

    Thank you! I am absolutely open to finding other options for history. Any suggestions you can offer would be much appreciated.

  5. #4

    Default

    For over a decade, SOTW has been the only complete history written in a narrative form. There are many topics in SOTW were there is little to no literature for children written, or at least at the time it was first published there wasn't much. This last go round for us homeschooling with our youngest child I've noticed that the children's historical literature voids have filled in considerably.

    Can you do SOTW secularly? Yes many people have and do use SOTW secularly. Is it religiously biased? Of course it is, SWB is married to a pastor after all. However, except for a few very skipable chapters in volume 1, it doesn't scream religious, it just faintly mumbles here and there.

    Recently, there have been some people taking on the same task SWB to write a complete history novel that competes with SOTW. You mentioned Pandia Press making their own version of a history narrative but there is also Curiosity Chronicles. If you want no mention of religion at all, CC isn't going to work for you because instead of leaving all religion out, it examines all religious beliefs as equally valid options without giving weight to one over another. This is the approach I prefer when it comes to religion and history.

    CC doesn't deal with evolution much or big bang because, as they explain early in the first book, those things are more science than history, which again I totally agree with and I'm happy to supplement on my own for those topics.

    Some books I highly recommend for younger elementary students on evolution and the big bang are:

    The Story of Space: A Book About Our Universe by Catherine Barr
    The Story of Life: A Book About Evolution by Catherine Barr
    The Story of People: A Book About Humankind by Catherine Barr
    Life Story by Virginia Lee Burton
    Grandmother Fish by Jonathan Tweet

    There are more but those are the ones that I have personally and love. The Catherine Barr books are newer with lovely colorful painted illustrations and lots of information in bite size pieces for young kids. I didn't write them or have anything to do with them, I just wish they were around when my older kids were little. ;-)

  6. #5

    Default

    Thank you, that is all so helpful! I also feel strongly that religions need to be studied, in an unbiased way, because they are key for understanding historical context and peoples of the world.I will take a look at everything you mentioned.

    Quote Originally Posted by MapleHillAcademy View Post
    For over a decade, SOTW has been the only complete history written in a narrative form. There are many topics in SOTW were there is little to no literature for children written, or at least at the time it was first published there wasn't much. This last go round for us homeschooling with our youngest child I've noticed that the children's historical literature voids have filled in considerably.

    Can you do SOTW secularly? Yes many people have and do use SOTW secularly. Is it religiously biased? Of course it is, SWB is married to a pastor after all. However, except for a few very skipable chapters in volume 1, it doesn't scream religious, it just faintly mumbles here and there.

    Recently, there have been some people taking on the same task SWB to write a complete history novel that competes with SOTW. You mentioned Pandia Press making their own version of a history narrative but there is also Curiosity Chronicles. If you want no mention of religion at all, CC isn't going to work for you because instead of leaving all religion out, it examines all religious beliefs as equally valid options without giving weight to one over another. This is the approach I prefer when it comes to religion and history.

    CC doesn't deal with evolution much or big bang because, as they explain early in the first book, those things are more science than history, which again I totally agree with and I'm happy to supplement on my own for those topics.

    Some books I highly recommend for younger elementary students on evolution and the big bang are:

    The Story of Space: A Book About Our Universe by Catherine Barr
    The Story of Life: A Book About Evolution by Catherine Barr
    The Story of People: A Book About Humankind by Catherine Barr
    Life Story by Virginia Lee Burton
    Grandmother Fish by Jonathan Tweet

    There are more but those are the ones that I have personally and love. The Catherine Barr books are newer with lovely colorful painted illustrations and lots of information in bite size pieces for young kids. I didn't write them or have anything to do with them, I just wish they were around when my older kids were little. ;-)

  7. #6

    Default

    If you are wanting to teach about world religions as part of your history, I would also recommend these books:

    The Kids Book of World Religions by Jennifer Glossop
    Scared Stories: Wisdom from World Religions by Marilyn McFarlane (older versions may also be called Sacred Myths)

    While I am an atheist, I find studying religions fascinating and it really gives a lot of depth and understanding to history studies. Understanding what people believed and why just makes them more human and relatable in my experience.

    My youngest son is a very philosophical thinker by nature. He always wants to know why things happen the way they do or what makes people do the things they do. Those two books have been invaluable for helping answer his questions.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Arrived RTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NM
    Posts
    1,258

    Default

    Pandia Press is introducing a new product called History Quest - looks like it may be history in narrative form (w/o being SOTW). I'm not familiar with it, but they have a free sample up https://www.pandiapress.com/history-quest/
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

  9. #8

    Default

    I read the SOTW and it is not unbiased nor secular and there are quite a few problems with how it presents history. It is very one-sided and Eurocenteric. When it talks about other religions there are lots of errors. The ones that stood out to me were in Islam, but I figure there are others if they I willing to let those slide. They leave out groups of people, such as the history of the Polynesians. The company that publishes it is religious and teaches history through their lens. I refuse to use it. While some people take out the religious bits, it really can't be helped due to the publishers world view.

    Instead I use Usborne History of the World as a spine, which goes back to the Big Bang and used books from our local, public library. I also use a timeline that I developed and we add dates to the timeline with important events. I added cultural resources, such as music, movies and the like to round out the lessons.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  10. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mariam View Post
    I use Usborne History of the World as a spine, which goes back to the Big Bang and used books from our local, public library. I also use a timeline that I developed and we add dates to the timeline with important events. I added cultural resources, such as music, movies and the like to round out the lessons.
    This is pretty much exactly what we do too (minus the timeline because I am not that organized and DD tends to jump around so much in what she is studying). She particularly likes the cultural side of, and her favourites are food, languages, and art.
    New Zealand-based. DD 11 (year 6 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 6 (year 1 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

    That's a kea (NZ parrot) in my avatar. You can learn about them on Beak & Brain - Genius Birds from Down Under on Netflix.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
History Odyssey?