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  1. #21

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    At third grade, I would say she just needs practice. Walk her through a few problems. Help her figure out how to attack word problems by doing them with her for a while and then as she gains confidence, let her take the lead and you just be her cheerleader until she can do it all by herself. That's how I would handle a third grader who struggled with word problems anyways.

    I'm pretty sure Math Mammoth has placement tests on their website, I would just go with whatever the placement test said to start with. Math Mammoth goes on sale pretty regularly at Homeschool Buyer's Coop and on the Math Mammoth website. I wouldn't jump to buy the whole set until you are sure the it will work for your children.

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  3. #22

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    Thanks a lot. Sorry I'm new to homeschooling that's why too many questions.

  4. #23

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    No such thing as too many questions!
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  5. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by MapleHillAcademy View Post
    At third grade, I would say she just needs practice. Walk her through a few problems. Help her figure out how to attack word problems by doing them with her for a while and then as she gains confidence, let her take the lead and you just be her cheerleader until she can do it all by herself. That's how I would handle a third grader who struggled with word problems anyways.

    I'm pretty sure Math Mammoth has placement tests on their website, I would just go with whatever the placement test said to start with. Math Mammoth goes on sale pretty regularly at Homeschool Buyer's Coop and on the Math Mammoth website. I wouldn't jump to buy the whole set until you are sure the it will work for your children.
    I agree with what MHA is saying here.

    Also, Math Mammoth has samples you can try-before-you-buy. The author is great at making sure that you have enough to try it out and know it is right for you.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  6. #25

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    As I am coming close to making our final selections for the next year I am seeing many things that my daughter hated this year and which I want to avoid in the next years of homeschooling.
    My husband is inclined to mosdos press literature due to its promise of maintaining moral values. But I can see that my daughter loves to read books but she wants to read what she picks at the library or elsewhere and course books material can make her hate reading. For this reason I am now loving Teaching the Classics, a socratic method for literary education. Any reviews on it?
    Also I was looking at RSO samples. It's too much of lab work, like my 1st grader's Real Science 4 Kids that my 3rd grader loves but 1st grader hates. Even I don't like it, gathering all the supplies, conducting labs and very less study material. I loved Nancy Larson science but it's very expensive. Then I came across Elemental Science Classical series, liking it so far as it's based on encyclopedias n other books to be read and then experiments. What are your opinions on these options? I want my kids to have fun while learning and want to achieve the goal with minimalism.

  7. #26

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    A lot of your choices are anti-secular...
    “Real Science 4 Kids” is not.
    https://www.secularhomeschool.com/hom...e+kids+secular

    Mosdos is secular, but Im not sure where you think it is teaching morality. The stories are all with protaganists doing the right things, but it is not the same as reading literature. Mosdos goes for teaching literary concepts that can be done in a lesson and a short story. I enjoyed the stories, but would sometimes have to read them in advance so I wouldnt tear up as I read them aloud with my son.

    Teaching the Classics is most definitely NOT secular.
    https://www.centerforlit.com/teaching-the-classics

    Anything calling itself “Classical” is unlikely to be secular, as well. Just another code word for xtian.

    If you go to religious homeschooler sites, they will promote religious material. If that is what you are looking for, then that is fine, but you wont find information on the products here.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  8. #27

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    I am into secular curriculum, we got Real Science 4 kids in our non religious timberdoodle kit.I might have got wrong understanding of teaching the classics. I thought it helps in understanding any type of literature study so I will be able to use stories according to our own choice. Actually I'm into our own created unit studies but I don't want to spend too much time on gathering all the resources and creating activities and working around them.

  9. #28

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    Timberdoodle isnt secular either....
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  10. #29

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    Real Science 4 Kids doesn't mention religion, especially in the lower levels, but it doesn't teach evolution explicitly either which is why many do not consider it to be "secular" but "neutral" at best. The author has a lot to say about intelligent design but it doesn't tend to leak out in her elementary level science. If you are fine with supporting an author whose views you might not agree with, are willing to supplement teaching evolution or whatever your family wants to teach, and the curriculum works for you, then RS4K will probably suit your needs just fine at the elementary level.

    I have to disagree with Alexsmom that "Classical" is a code word for Christian. Many classical curricula and schools are Christian but Classical education, in and of itself, is not necessarily Christian. You can create a classical education without a religious element but you may have to read a few books here and there that mention religion but if it is for the teacher and you can read with a critical eye, then there is plenty of good information to be found. If it is meant to be read to or by the child, you can choose to skip it or use it as a jumping off point for a discussion about beliefs, whichever suits your family better.

    I think you will be alright with Teaching The Classics. The publisher is not secular but here is the statement directly from the syllabus of Teaching The Classics:

    Teaching the Classics is not a faith-based curriculum. The techniques presented here may be
    used by any teacher with any work of literature, regardless of religion.
    The authors discussed in Teaching the Classics include Leo Tolstoy, Rudyard Kipling, Henry
    Wadsworth Longfellow, Beatrix Potter, and Mark Twain, among others. Like all artists of the
    Western tradition, these authors addressed religious themes from time to time in their works.
    The seminar discusses such themes when they appear in the works themselves, in the same way
    that a sixteenth-century history course might mention the Protestant Reformation. At no time,
    however, does Teaching the Classics assume or advocate any religion.
    Of course, you should always read with a critical eye and decide for yourself if it is right for your family and how you are choosing to present religion and beliefs. There are other sources for the information presented in Teaching The Classics though if you do not feel right supporting a primarily religious publisher.

  11. #30

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    Also meant to mention, you can get lab kits for many popular homeschool science curricula from Home Science Tools. That would eliminate some of the tedious gathering of supplies for experiments.

    Another option for science you might consider is just getting science books from the library to read and study. You can get whatever books they are interested in or choose a topic and get books for them to study. Have them make notebook pages about what they learned from the books. Then if the book mentions an experiment they might like to try, you can do it or just get a subscription kit from somewhere like Steve Spangler to do experiments. Hands on science is great for kids to experience science but the experiments do not necessarily have to match what they are learning in books. If you are concerned about making sure they get a little of everything science has to offer, use a general science encyclopedia as a spine to guide your studies.

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