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Thread: Easy Grammar

  1. #1

    Default Easy Grammar

    DS is 9, starting grade 4, and is a reluctant writer who still makes some pretty (atrocious) spelling and grammar mistakes. We've done some grammar exercises and I point things out to him, but nothing comprehensive. He still likes to look at print that has more white space and is not so dense.

    I'm trying to decide whether I should get Easy Grammar 3 and 4 or Easy Grammar 4 and 5. Has anyone had experience with these books? What would you recommend?

    Thanks!
    Homeschooling an only, DS9

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  3. #2

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    Sorry I have not tried Easy Grammar. I have found the best thing that helps my DD is doing copywork. She is naturally a good speller though, so our experience is probably different and not of much help to you. I can tell when she has not been doing her copywork though. She gets to choose her writing each day, but I like her to do copywork twice a week. When she has not been doing copywork, her free writing is not so good in terms of grammar and spelling.

    We have not done any set grammar curricula intensively yet. I did buy some of the Michael Clay Thompson books for her to read on the ipad when she feels like it, and I tried some free samples of Editor in Chief from the Critical Thinking Company, both of which she likes.

    Does Easy Grammar have free samples? Can you print some out and see what level he likes doing?
    New Zealand-based. DD 10 (year 5 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 5 (year 0 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

  4. #3

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    We never did easy grammar, but really like First Language Lessons - we started the 3rd book in 4th grade, but you could probably just do the 4th book in 4th grade as there is a lot of review. It is very thorough with chanting to remember things like pronouns and prepositions. It is parent intensive as you have to read the lesson as the child works through the workbook. My DD loved it - she really likes that kinds of interaction, DS10 threw it across the room, but he still does know his grammar. We are now doing daily grams and it is a review and they both have held onto what they learned.

    As far as spelling goes... my DD has never been good at it and we have tried every program and she is still not good at it. She is in 7th grade now and she says that it doesn't matter and when she isn't sure she just asks Siri. I have never been able to decide how much does it really matter - only you can answer that. I would look at All About Spelling and Logic of English.
    Last edited by HawaiiGeek; 09-23-2018 at 02:02 PM.
    Beth
    DS16 with ASD, DD12 and DS10

  5. #4

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    Thank you for the suggestions. I will look into them.

    NZ_Mama: What kind of copywork do you assign and what other writing does your daughter do? What does she choose from?

    I was able to see some sample pages from eBay photos and it looked like something he could handle. But in terms of the whole book, I don't know.
    Homeschooling an only, DS9

  6. #5

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    My son worked his way through Easy grammer 3. He had retained nothing at all by the end of the book even with review and my help. We switched to first language lessons and he has improved a lot over the last three months.
    I'm not saying your child won't get anything out of it but for us, it was a huge flop.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by vicsmom View Post

    NZ_Mama: What kind of copywork do you assign and what other writing does your daughter do? What does she choose from?
    This is my daughter's current list of writing activities that she can choose from (she gets complete free choice as what she choose to do):
    – Copywork (for both this and dictation usually DD just picks a section of the text she liked or it has something in it technically that she has not come across before or does not understand. Occasionally, we use a Bravewriter Arrow but only once or twice a year)
    – Dictation
    – Narration (we use the Build Your Library narration cards)
    – Freewriting
    – Poetry (either writing or reading it or Poetry Teatime Bravewriter-style. She also uses a local poetry website that runs monthly competitions - Poetry Box)
    – Grammar (reads one of the Michael Clay Thompson books or does some of Editor-in-Chief)
    – Cursive (Handwriting Without Tears)
    – Research (free choice of topic and researches it online or in books and writes notes or a summary of what she found)
    – Writing project (using Bravewriter Partnership Writing)
    – Word roots (using some samples I printed out from online)
    – Reading comprehension/discussion activities or questions (from online for the book she is reading)
    – Functional writing (list, instructions, letter, etc.)
    New Zealand-based. DD 10 (year 5 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 5 (year 0 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

  8. #7

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    I think it depends on what your job is as to how much spelling helps later in life. I am an editor, and spelling is essential to me doing my job well. Even if I don't always know the correct spelling of some obscure words, my job depends on the skill of being able to read through text and spot that words are spelled incorrectly or where the incorrect word has been used (affect/effect, weather/whether, set-up/setup /set up). And the skill to be able to do that comes from being relatively good at spelling.

    However, my brother on the other hand is an atrocious speller. He is dyslexic. However, it has not hindered him in long-term success. He has done really well at computer programming and never has trouble finding a really well paying job. He never finished highschool or university, and his dyslexia issues probably affected him there, but ultimately he has found a way around it.

    Does your son enjoy doing grammar work?
    New Zealand-based. DD 10 (year 5 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 5 (year 0 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

  9. #8

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    We're using Easy Grammar now at grade level for grade 5. We'd used First Language Lessons in grades 2 and 4. I have to say, I like FLL much better - you need to engage more, though, and although it feels hard to get the sit-down focus time in, esp. with teaching more than 1, we were able to discuss the concepts and pretty much learn together. Then I was able to better pick out the concepts in other things she read, wrote, etc. With EG, she doesn't need me nearly as much, but I'm constantly correcting her work (there is so much of it if you do the whole thing) and she's going through it quickly, but I'm not so sure she's taking it in. I wish I liked it more - it's a little easier on me time-wise! The thing we all didn't like about FLL though was all the diagramming - it was hard to keep my kid engaged with the diagramming. Good Luck!

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