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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by DLPMom523 View Post
    ...I'm thinking about not getting full levels of each, but rather half levels/quarter levels. Like, 3B or 3C workbook and guide for Beast Academy; 3A or 3B workbook of Singapore; and 3A or 3B of Mammoth Math. See what works from there, and then order more of that.
    I would not do that. It would drive you (and your son crazy). It would be equivalent to going to a restaurant for dinner, getting stuck on choosing a dish because you do not really know if you'd prefer beef, chicken, or fish, and ending up ordering all three main courses. You wouldn't do that, right? Because food is food, and any one dish would eventually be just fine. The same with math - math is math, and any one of those curricula would be just fine. In the end, it is not a curriculum that will make or break your learning experience, it is your dedication, consistency, and flexibility, no matter what you use. Yes, homeschoolers combine different curricula to meet their needs, but you need experience to do that. Experience teaching your kid - his strength, weaknesses, his pace, his attention span etc etc. When you are just starting, start simply.
    mom to 3 girls: DD10, DD9, DD6

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  3. #22

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    Oh, I missed that you'd planned to do it that way. Yeah, don't do that. Oksana is right.

    Sometimes using more than one program can be good. You have two options if you hit a stumbling block. You can test the waters and see how it goes. You can have one main program that you're going through all of (say, Math Mammoth or Singapore) and one enrichment program that you're just dipping in and out of for fun whenever you have time (say, Beast Academy).

    But it's not like there's one set of information that is going to be in every program in the same order. You could get 4A from one program, 4B from another, and 4C from a third and somehow all of them could cover the same topics and not cover some other topic. So you'd have done 3/4 of "fourth grade math" and somehow not done a single thing with fractions. To extend Oksana's metaphor, you'd have eaten a full meal and yet not gotten any protein or veggies - only appetizers and dessert.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
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    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

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  4. #23

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    I didn't even think of that- in terms of the levels not covering the same information program to program and it not matching up. Really good point! So, if I picked one main curriculum (Singapore, Horizons, Math Mammoth) and then bought the Beast Academy just for fun to do in spare time and test out, that would work? That's probably a much better idea, and would be less confusing to him.

    That really helps alot- so I appreciate it! Both of you!

    And AGS is too similar to public school books- is that what you mean? I definitely don't want him to get bored. The package just looked really nice, but what may be exciting to me, may not be to him...

    I may do the History of US books and then Story of the World alongside it. Do you recommend getting all or the History of US books at once? Or, would 2 or 3 be sufficient to start? And I had my eye on volume 4 of Story of the World. Would it be okay to skip the first few?

  5. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by DLPMom523 View Post
    ... Do you recommend getting all or the History of US books at once? Or, would 2 or 3 be sufficient to start? ...
    In general, I would recommend just buying 1 item of anything you are going to try. You will never know for sure how it will go, whether he will like it or not, or at what point he will be done with it and want no more. It is always easy to buy the next one when the previous one is finished.
    mom to 3 girls: DD10, DD9, DD6

  6. #25

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    You can also print out lots of samples of most things to try before committing to buying anything. Math Mammoth has really large samples. Beast Academy, you can only get small samples to print out (a couple of pages of the guidebook and workbook for each one), but they were enough for my daughter to know she liked them.

    With the basic facts, I would print the tests of the blog I linked and go way back and test even addition and subtraction facts. My daughter, even though she should have known these, still was stumbling on things like +9's and +8's. And apparently the facts sets all build on each other (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and then division), so if you don't have the earlier ones sorted, you will still have troubles. The tests don't take long and there are suggestions based on the results on what ones they need to practice/learn more.
    New Zealand-based. DD 11 (year 6 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 6 (year 1 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

    That's a kea (NZ parrot) in my avatar. You can learn about them on Beak & Brain - Genius Birds from Down Under on Netflix.

  7. #26

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    Horizons math apparently has scripture on the pages... not secular.

    https://www.secularhomeschool.com/hom...-horizons.html
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  8. #27

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    I saw that, but some said they saw none or very very few references. Honestly, I am okay with a little bit... if it is a curriculum that works really well for us, I wouldn't give it up because of that alone. If it was a lot, then I wouldn't even try it in the first place though.

    Horizons and MM are spiral, right? And Singapore is Mastery? It would be easier to make a decision if I knew which style would work best for him. But I'm just not sure, unfortunately.

  9. #28

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    MM is not spiral. It's definitely mastery. I'm not sure about Horizons. If spiral is important to you, Saxon and CLE (which is religious) are more spiral. This is not the only lens through which to think about a math program though. There's also whether a program is parts to whole or whole to parts, whether it emphasizes concepts or algorithms first, whether it teaches directly or encourages students to discover the math, whether it uses manipulatives or not... And it's not like there's some magic wand. Just pick something. Don't spend too much. Do it. If it doesn't work, reflect on what you learned and switch it up.

    Yes, I think you can do a main program and add Beast.

    Let me just say it plainly. Doing both Story of the World and History of US would be too much. Don't do that. They're both full programs. Also, can you imagine doing a full world history alongside a full US history as a fifth grader? Confusing.

    I think you're trying to buy too much stuff and you're going to regret some of it, honestly. Some of us do use multiple resources for a single subject, but don't start out your homeschool that way. Ease into it! Get one thing and see if it works before getting another thing. Most of the time, you only need one thing. Sometimes you don't need a thing at all.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

  10. #29

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    Oops! I had MM confused, I think, with another one I looked at. You're right about it being Mastery.

    I didn't realize both of those history books/sets were full curriculums. They didn't seem that big.

    And I probably should have mentioned off the bat that we aren't new to homeschooling. We're actually four years in. We did Oak Meadow for two years, but he was very bored with that. Then we did a combination of online resources and library books, as well as a ton of Usborne books (including the encyclopedias). Most subjects have been working, with the exception of math.

    I just don't want to spend too much time and money trying a bunch of math curriculums that don't work for him. But, logically, I know that whatever I choose- there is no guarantee it will work.

  11. #30

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    My daughter is 10 (year 5 NZ) and we have been homeschooling for 2 years, and we have never used a history curriculum and I don't plan on buying one a separate history curriculum soon. So far we have just done literature and interest based and it has been more than enough.

    What do you want your child to learn for history, what do they want to learn/where do their interests lie. I decided I just want my kids to have a good appreciation of all cultures, religions, what has happened in the world in the past, but they don't need to go through a chronological history of the world at this age. My kids like the fun stuff about studying other countries: the cooking/baking, music, language, animals, and so forth. They are not so into the historical events.

    Maybe just pick up a good history encyclopedia and then let your child read it for interest when they want to. They will soon let you know what parts they are interested in, then you can design unit studies around those interests.
    Last edited by NZ_Mama; 07-09-2018 at 09:25 PM.
    New Zealand-based. DD 11 (year 6 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 6 (year 1 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

    That's a kea (NZ parrot) in my avatar. You can learn about them on Beak & Brain - Genius Birds from Down Under on Netflix.

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