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  1. #11

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    I will definitely do some of the placement tests!

    That's exactly why I was considering Beast Academy- I knew visually that it would appeal to him and grab his attention. So I hoped it would spark an interest. I wonder if we started somewhere in level 3, to ease into it, if it could work.

    I'm kind-of debating trying a few different ones. One level of Beast Academy, one workbook of Singapore, and one level of Mammoth Math... and kind-of see which one(s) may spark an interest. Would that be crazy, to try out a few?

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  3. #12

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    We learned our multiplication tables doing “multiplication dice”. Start with two six sided die, see how many he gets in a minute, compare with how many you get (handicap yourself by repeating the whole problem aloud, he just has to give answer). Do 5 rounds a day, until you feel he is fluent. Go on to one 10-sided die with a 6, then two 10sideds. We also made a scatterplot showing how many were right each day, thus adding graphing and motivating by seeing improvement.
    Way more exciting than flash cards, and he can see this isnt something you are torturing him with!

    Amazon sells 10 sided dice, or you can buy a cool looking set of gaming dice for under $10.
    https://www.amazon.com/s/gp/search/r...nid=2470954011

    I hope that helps! Knowing all the fundamentals solidly may be the only sticking point that is causing frustration.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  4. #13

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    Obviously, it would cost you more if you use multiple resources, but there is no reason you could not get the Beast Academy guides, opt out of buying the the workbooks, and add that to Singapore or whatever you end up choosing. You could try out a workbook as a puzzle supplement just for fun, as well.

    The reason I say this is that if you generally buy your child books just for fun, anyway, you could figure it into your fun budget and see what happens. if you don't treat it as an assignment, it might expand his view of math as a fun thing.

  5. #14

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    That's a really cute idea, that may actually work with him! I'll give it a try. Thank you! 😊

    Any ideas on making division less frustrating?

  6. #15

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    That's very true. I would love for him to view it as a bit more fun, because right now it is the only subject that he can't stand.

    I'm thinking about not getting full levels of each, but rather half levels/quarter levels. Like, 3B or 3C workbook and guide for Beast Academy; 3A or 3B workbook of Singapore; and 3A or 3B of Mammoth Math. See what works from there, and then order more of that.

  7. #16

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    Regarding Beast Academy. It's very advanced, but it does occasionally resonate with some kids who are struggling. I think the key component is whether they really can enjoy grappling with the hard ones some. The younger grades are not significantly easier. They're all hard and in depth. If you get just the guides, you'll find that they're almost certainly within reach for him - they're much easier and lighter in general than the workbooks. The real meat is in there.

    If I were in your shoes I would try Beast since you'd like to see how it goes. Start a grade level behind though. And I'd pair it with one other and I'd lean cheaper before more expensive. So Math Mammoth (cheap) or MEP (free). I find MM to be a little easier to dive into at the higher levels than Singapore, which is a little bit more tricky for kids who haven't been doing a Singapore style math all the way through.

    In terms of history and science... some other options to toss out... TOPS for science, Middle School Chemistry for science, doing an online class for science... For history, Story of US by Hakim is just right for that age. Build Your Library does US history for 5th grade, so that could be an option. I'm with others that I don't love how Pandia Press does history, honestly.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
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    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

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  8. #17

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    I would avoid division until he has his multiplication facts down, at this point. If he is faced with the horrific memories of struggling with long division without really getting the hang of it, better imo to stay away from it until he can approach with more confidence. I taught “short division” for single digit divisors, then showed how to bring that into “long division” when the numbers got too complicated. By that time, he already had the pattern of “how many times, how many left over”. My DS enjoyed solving really large ridiculous problems with a whole line of digits (Short division way). Such as 328647295371947593719302 / 8. Way more exciting than 7392 / 6. I think he liked watching me manually confirm his work too. He also loved learning the “secret” rules for seeing if a number was factorable evenly (2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 11).

    The way Singapore breaks up its workbooks is into a A then B section, B being cumulative from A. I dont see the utility of only buying an A, or buying the wrong level of it.

    You might also work the fundamentals before doing placement tests. If all he needs is memorization work (maybe 2 weeks for multiplication facts), no sense putting him in too low a level. Or selecting a program for kids who dont get math intuitively, when that isnt actually his situation at all (maybe).
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  9. #18

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    Thank you for all the suggestions! I will look into all of those, as I haven't heard of any except BYL. Do you have any experience with Story of the World, or AGS US History? I think I'll be ruling out History Odyssey.

    As for the math, I think I will try a mix and see how it goes. Rather than investing in one set thing. Do you have any input on Horizons math? That was what I had initially picked out, but started second guessing. I had heard that it was good for kids who struggled with math.

  10. #19

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    To be honest, I can't tell if he's just getting frustrated and not grasping it - or if he doesn't get it intuitively. He struggled with regrouping at first as well, but once it finally clicked- he flies through it now.

    I feel like it is more of a memorization issue, and that once he has the times tables memorized, it will be a breeze with larger numbers. Would a chart on his wall for him to study, in conjunction with the dice idea, be helpful? Although I don't know if that would be just as boring as the flashcards were to him.

  11. #20

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    AGS is some Pearson workbook. No experience, but... it's some Pearson workbook. That would be a hard pass for me based on that alone unless I had a kid who was just school workbooks mad for some reason.

    Story of the World is good... there are some bits in volumes I and II (especially I) that aren't really secular. It's written for slightly younger students, but there's a ton of information in there - you can totally use it with a 5th grader. It would not be my cup of tea for middle schoolers personally. If you're keen to do a sort of western centered world history, I'd do Builders of the Old World or Gombrich's A Little History of the World as a spine and add resources. Or just do the Kingfisher Encyclopedia of World History as a spine and go from there.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

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